30 footer too small? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 47 Old 03-03-2009
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I don't think 30 feet is too small either. I currently have two boats, a Westerly Pageant; a 23 foot english pocket crusier. I've lived in it for going on two years. It is small, but it's plenty of room for me. I can cruise for a week with my girlfriend and daughter.
There are some pictures in here: Flickr: endeavor_64's Photostream
I just bought a 30 footer a few weeks ago, a yankee 30. I was looking for something a little bigger, the enclosed head is nice. But the main feature was speed. The Westerly is a little sluggish.
You can see the interior of the Yankee here: Winterhawk Restoration
I think there is a lot to the go small, go now. And the best part is small boats can be had for cheap, and systems/maintenence tend to cost less.
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post #12 of 47 Old 03-03-2009
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It really depends on what your priorities are. Strathgowan was a blog about a couple who lived aboard an Alberg 30 with their toddler son. IIRC, they've since moved up in size, since they've now got two or three children, but it was doable for them—because it was their priority.

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post #13 of 47 Old 03-06-2009
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Like a lot of people have said, it depends almost entirely on a combination of your personality, where you are in life, and your ability to draw a distinction between the stuff you need and the stuff you want.

If you're able to part with the things most people insist on surrounded themselves with, you'll be golden (and, I suspect, life will be simpler).

I know a married couple who spent their honeymoon on a 24' (I believe it was a Bristol, I could be wrong), and liked it so much, they bought one and lived on it together for two years. They moved ashore after their second kid, but it was exactly right for them during that time in their life.

41' True North, 1980
Boston Harbor
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post #14 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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Is a 30 footer too small? For what? for how many? What is your expectations ? what are you willing to give up? what do you hope to gain?
Not a simple question.
As far as I am concerned a 30 footer is not too small .I lived on a 27 footer for 2 years with my husband and a small dog spending that time in the Keys and the Bahamas and mainly at anchor and with no shower and no refridgeration and very little money.We have no horror stories to tell and had a great deal of fun.
What do you want?
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post #15 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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I think 30 is big enough. I have a 34 and its to big for me, difficult to sail by my self (most of my passangers do not know how to sail).

B Dock, (where the party is) Lake Mead Marina
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post #16 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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My Yankee 30 and a Catalina 30 (for example), are two very different boats. While a foot more beam in the Catalina doesn't seem like much on paper, the actual difference down below is startling. On the other hand, the difference in performance is equally noticeable. I know of a couple that live quite happily on a Yankee, though two people seems tight for me. Also "living aboard" while cruising is very different than doing it while working in the "real world". As already mentioned, a mild climate makes things a lot easier.

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post #17 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raceman View Post
l thought so
A 30' beam should be fine

Cheers,
Shawn

S/V Windgeist
1982 Tartan 37C

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post #18 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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L124C has a great point- here in Hawaii it's much easier to live aboard a small boat as the weather usually gives you all that additional deck space to be on- my neighbors across the dock have 3 kids under the age of 6 and live aboard a 30 ft custom gaff rigged wooden sail boat-They're experienced sailors and feel they have plenty of room now (of course when those boys get to be teenagers all bets are off lol!)
When my husband and I were looking for our boat I was overly concerned with length and over the years came to realize that it has nothing really to do with whether the boat is a great liveaboard or not.
(I used to be like the guy in "Jaws"... "We need a bigger boat...")
Look in a range and don't rule out those 27 footers...

Patricia Wood
Author & Sailor
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post #19 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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30.2small

Twenty two was not too small. Just too slow and too swing-keel. I got a 24' and couldn't ask for more.

Let me give you a formula about boats.

Fun=a* 1/length

a is an arbitrary constant determined by the user.
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post #20 of 47 Old 03-08-2009
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It depends on the couple and the number of children! My wife and I moved aboard a 30' sloop than we bought in 1971. By 1973 we moved to a 33' boat, but when our two chidren were 7 and 9 years old we went ot a 41' boat. We could go back to the 30' and do well, but we're spoiled by the 41'. Our kids have long since moved away and the aft cabin is largely empty. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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