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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #31  
Old 03-24-2009
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I just bought a 30 foot islander a couple of months ago and have been living on it for about a month. Its more of a weekender rather than a liveaboard but I don't have much stuff so it works out ok. The one thing I am noticing is there is a distinct lack of storage space for things like clothes and stuff that you just don't want laying around. I am compensating by putting things in plastic bins and they work as an ok substitute for drawers. I have found several leaks in the rain and my stuff is at least dry that way.

I am finding I do a lot of shifting things from berths to settees and then back while I am trying to do things. But if you keep things organized and tidy it goes pretty quick.

If you have anyone come to stay ask them to bring a smaller soft sided suitcase. In 30 feet a big hardsided suitcase takes up pretty much an entire settee.

I am trying to plan out how to attack the leaks, add some more storage space and clean up cosmetic issues so I don't have to do things twice.

I was kind of worried that the alcohol stove would not work very well but I am finding it works just fine and I have no problems with the heat output of it. It boils water quick enough and I have had no real problems with it. I thought for sure I would be replacing it but I am finding it quite functional. The oven does not work so I can't comment on it until I get the tubes cleaned out but it I am using it to store my dishes anyway so am not in a big hurry to get it working.
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30' Islander Bahama
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  #32  
Old 03-24-2009
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I don't think anyone ever has all the storage space they want, and whatever you do have, you'll fill with stuff at some point.

I've seen some good stroage ideas. Getting a fabric shoe rack to hang in the head seems like a good one. You can fit shirts and stuff in each of the "boxes". they are long bu narrow and easy to fit somewhere.

I saw one boat that had mesh storage areas everywhere. The most noticable was against the forward main-cabin bulkhead. There was a small metal frame that went from the cabin side, near the port lights inboard about 18" then curved up and attached to the cabin ceiling. There was mesh strung between the two metal rails one fore one aft. I'll see if I can find a picture of that.

They also had made some hanging pockets to go on the tables, both in the main cabin and in the cockpit. The cockpit had two drop leafs and the kept one up nad the other down. The one down had the pockets. Inside they did the same.

I found a few pictures:



More Ideas here:
Flickr: endeavor_64's Photostream
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Last edited by WesterlyPageant; 03-25-2009 at 01:09 AM.
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  #33  
Old 03-29-2009
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After living on a too-big 44' houseboat for a few years I figured out I didn't need most of that space and I'd rather have the freedom to go more places. 99% of my belowdecks time is spent at a desk, in a comfortable reading chair, in the galley or in bed. On a 20-footer those happen to all be the same place, but move a few cushions around and it works just as well. I could wish the head & shower were a little more convenient, but if they were I'd probably be wishing I could still float in a foot of water or pull it to a new cruising ground behind a car.

If I was going to have someone else aboard for more than the usual week or two at a time I'd probably look for a different (though not necessarily larger) arrangement that would let us get a bulkhead between us when needed.
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  #34  
Old 03-29-2009
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Happened to notice this thread when I was coming onto the forum to ask for a bit of assistance. (See general questions regarding hyfield levers) Just had to put in a few cents worth. As some one mentioned here, Larry and I spent eleven years circumnavigating on board a 24'4"cutter (Seraffyn). We then spent much of the past 25 years voyaging extensively on board 29'6" Taleisin. Both boats were purpose built, very beamy engineless cutters. Some folks say Taleisin, has the living space of the average 33 footer. Were they big enough? - wouldn't have traded either for any boat we saw out there. But maybe the real question was, were they small enough. Small enough so I could sail either myself, small enough to maintain in top condition at an affordable price, small enough to easily fit into corners of marinas in crowded areas.

Just this year as we sailed through the Pacific we stopped in only two ports were there were other voyagers. During our short stays we met five couples on boats 32 feet and smaller. One couple who had just come in to a large sum of money and also were both close to six feet tall, wanted to trade up to something about 40 feet. The other couples were delighted with their boats, and extolled the advantages of the smaller size. All were out there crossing oceans, enjoying freedom sooner and at a fraction of the cost(both in cash and maintenance time) of the folks who waited until they could afford that 40 or 45 footer.

Lin Pardey
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  #35  
Old 03-30-2009
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I am shopping for a boat and really like the cape dorys and southern cross 31 and plan to liveaboard as well. I have seen and talked to so many who had bigger boats like 40ft and was tired of working all the time paying just to keep it tied to the dock and there very happy on there 31ft boats. I to wanted a 35 at first but then realized I don't need that, I would be just find on like a 31ft so that is what I'm shopping for. All you can do is go walk aboard these boats and decide for yourself. I asked the same questions when I first considerd this but the more and more I read I would rather something smaller and it's all I can afford anyway. I hope to after I buy my boat to save up and take off for a few years so around a 30ft is more of something I could afford.

Chris
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  #36  
Old 05-23-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keldee View Post
I lived on a 27 footer for 2 years with my husband and a small dog spending that time in the Keys and the Bahamas and mainly at anchor and with no shower and no refridgeration and very little money.
To each their own, but that arrangement sounds like a nightmare to me.

The first thing I would toss would be the yappie "small dog". Those sort of rodents would never have evolved but for the intervention of man with Natural Selection. At the first sign of a dog "mess" on board, over he'd go. There's no way the Captain is going clean-up after little Poopsy on my boat.

The second thing to go would be the wife. "No shower and no refrigeration" pretty much eliminates both reasons for keeping a wife around in the first place: cooking during the day and companionship at night. Next port, she's gone, too.

Having paired things down to just me and the 27-footer, the situation would then seem livable to me.
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  #37  
Old 05-23-2009
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Never mind dog and "the" wife overboard,if my husband had had anything remotely near YOUR attitude YOU would have been overboard and then the dog and I would have had a pretty good time.
On the serious side my point was,you do not need a big boat with all the fancy stuff to have a really great time.It all depends on your attitude.
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  #38  
Old 05-24-2009
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For the record, I never said "wife overboard", just the dog. I believe I said the wife would be dropped off at the next port.
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  #39  
Old 05-24-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hynes57 View Post
To each their own, but that arrangement sounds like a nightmare to me.

The first thing I would toss would be the yappie "small dog". Those sort of rodents would never have evolved but for the intervention of man with Natural Selection. At the first sign of a dog "mess" on board, over he'd go. There's no way the Captain is going clean-up after little Poopsy on my boat.

The second thing to go would be the wife. "No shower and no refrigeration" pretty much eliminates both reasons for keeping a wife around in the first place: cooking during the day and companionship at night. Next port, she's gone, too.

Having paired things down to just me and the 27-footer, the situation would then seem livable to me.
What a ridiculous way to introduce yourself.
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  #40  
Old 05-24-2009
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Probably 30 feet is a good choice for a lot of people. Reasonable cost for reasonable room and can probably be rigged for coastal cruising.
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