What do you do during repairs? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 22 Old 01-26-2010
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Originally Posted by eryka View Post
Now that we live aboard, when we’re hauled for maintenance, the phrase “fish out of water” seems a lot more apt.
Living on the hard really does suck. They put my boat down on standing water, i had to do a can-can kick to get my toe on the bottom rung of the swim ladder. I was doing the bottom and leaving mud tracks and blue fingerprints on everything. And pay close attention to what eryka says, about systems out of water. Anything that drains will go down the side of the boat. For an on the hard adventure I'd recommend you secure a proper ladder and a standard house-outlet to shorepower adapter. Anyway i'm going off on a tangent.

I've been able to get a lot of minor stuff done without leaving the boat, but there are inconveniences. Sanding dust is insidious, and it's super hard to work around varnishing interior pieces you're too lazy to remove. I wish i had done all my varnish in the summer when i could leave the companionway open and rig some fans. As it is now, it's put down a coat, go off to spend the weekend at aunt Sissie's. Put down a coat, go to work, come back home and lie awake contemplating toxicity.

But so far, I've been able to live around it. Living on it can be a great motivator to get work done quickly if say, the heat goes out.
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post #12 of 22 Old 01-26-2010
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Decide if you wish to plant vegetables or flowers in the dirt tracked aboard.
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post #13 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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winter and Summer 'on the hard'

Hi guys,

I have lived on board for the past 2 years, and i can tell you times have been both testing and enjoyable. My first boat was a kingfisher k20 (yes, 20 feet!), and i first moved onto her within the first week of purchacing her in october 2008. She was in a very poor state when i first moved on, with mold and mildew in places i couldn't believe it could live! It was fairly warm when i first moved on, so the smell was terrible, however a good 'spring clean' solved that problem! As the winter took hold, some damage started to reveal itself. I decided that the repairs could wait until spring, as i needed to dry out the entire boat. The weather was fantastic during the spring and summer of 2009, and I managed to repair quite bad osmosis, as well as putting right a lot of poorly 'bodged' jobs (the bow fell off as i started to remove the layers of water-based paint the previous owner had put on!). During this repair period, which included a complete overhaul of the boat - painting, replacement skin fittings, new heads, insulating the cabin etc. i held private bbq's for the guys helping me. Life on-board was interesting,and i always found myself painting, filling, sanding, or polishing the boat - even at night! The only frustrating part was the yard's hosepipe didn't quite reach my boat!

I have since then bought a new boat (a Macwester 26) that i had transported to milford haven, UK, which i have lived and worked on throughout the harshest winter i have known so far in the UK (-16C). I had a wood burner on board, which had its flue poking out a port hole, that kept the boat warm and dry. The only issue was the condensation in the morning, as i NEVER leave a fire burning whilst i sleep.

I have since sailed back to Cardiff, where i am now building up a cruising kitty and getting my certificates and training ready to commit to a full-time world cruising period - no plans yet for when i stop cruising.

I always maintain my boats, regardless of where i am (floating or on the hard), and this really keeps me going (and keeps me sane!) Life on-board is a commitment and a lifestyle choice. I have had people come and go who thought they could live on a cruising yacht, but couldn't cope with the small space.
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post #14 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tanley View Post
We're just daysailors/weekenders, but who doesn't entertain the thought of living on a boat full time?

It got me to thinking, if you live on your boat, what do you do when it has to be hauled for larger maintenance items and repairs? Do you stay with friends, a hotel, climb up and down a ladder on the hard?
My wife and I always stay on board. We usually do most of the work ourselves or at least supervise closely.
There have been times when it has been a challenge. For example, after lightening damage and installing new electrics (ourselves). The wires need to be run under the roof or under the floor so many roof panels off and floorboards up. At one stage when trying to take a coffee break there was not one place left we could sit down on the whole boat
Overall however life on the hard is still much better than a day in the office.
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post #15 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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...however life on the hard is still much better than a day in the office...
I could not agree more!
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post #16 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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I think it would depend on what you are doing. A week to repaint the bottom, change some zincs and maybe pop a few blisters is a lot different than a month or 2 drying out a hull and doing a peel.

The big question is whether you are up to climbing a ladder many times a day. Good exercise for some, heart attack for others.
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post #17 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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I think it would depend on what you are doing. A week to repaint the bottom, change some zincs and maybe pop a few blisters is a lot different than a month or 2 drying out a hull and doing a peel.

The big question is whether you are up to climbing a ladder many times a day. Good exercise for some, heart attack for others.
I couldn't agree with you anymore. Mind you, I was only intending on a few weeks, and ended up with 6+ months. Ah well, make the most of it by making a BBQ area next to the boat on the ladder side, and a make-do workshop the other! This is if the yard lets you...
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post #18 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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when i first bought my boat i had to spend 3 days living on the boat on the hard. it was great, sit in the cockpit at night and watch movies on the internet. used the bathroom and showers at the marina. the only difference was no wave noise on the hull.
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post #19 of 22 Old 03-27-2010
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I'd point out that it really depends on the boat as well. Many multihulls have a much shorter climb when on the hard, since they have a shallower draft to begin with. Also, many catamarans have accommodations in both hulls, so if work is being done on one, living can be shifted to the other temporarily.

Likewise, a monohull that has aft and forward cabins can allow living aboard to some degree better than a boat that only has a single cabin, especially if the work requires tearing up or working in that cabin.

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post #20 of 22 Old 03-29-2010
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Luckily, my buddy at the yard deals boats, so will let me stay on something he has in inventory...Kinda fun to check out something different, but it means i make a temp. conversion to stinkboater...

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