Moving out - Page 7 - SailNet Community
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post #61 of 73 Old 05-22-2010
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Great comments. As was mentioned, look for the absolute smallest boat that will give you the most comfort. I loved living on my Cape Dory 27 back in the '80s. It didn't have full standing headroom. But it had lots of comfortable sitting room and the berths were comfortable for sleeping.

If you are going to live on a boat, it will help you make a smoother transition if you get used to living in a tiny space. Downsize your lifestyle to the bare minimum. I'm ashore right now and doing this. And it's because I intend to return to the liveaboard lifestyle.

Go small and simple so you can sail more and save lots of money. On my 27, I was able to get her underway in 20 minutes and go sailing. And, I kept her simple enough without all the crapola that people tend to bring aboard for creature comfort. So, while my neighbor liveaboards were tied to the dock in huge boats, repairing this and maintaining that, I was out every weekend cruising from Friday to Sunday. That's when I worked full time.

But the point is, smaller and simpler will pay you back many times over. More time for sailing and more money in the cruising kitty.

Captain John
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post #62 of 73 Old 05-22-2010
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Kind of funny, but I tend to hear two extremes on live aboard boat buying. One side is the "buy as much boat as you can afford" and the other camp is the "go as small as you can live in". I think the small boat camp sounds like the way to go. You can always upsize later and you'll know more of what you want after some time spent on the smaller/cheaper boat.

I've downsized my life pretty well in prep for living aboard. Everything I own fits in my car and I'm living out of a hotel at the moment until my land based job is done(which can't happen soon enough). It's surprising how little stuff you really need.

I started looking at larger boats and have slowly been going smaller and smaller as I realize I won't be taking much with me. I think it's mostly been a matter now of wanting good tankage and food storage so I can anchor out / be away from it all for long periods if I want.
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post #63 of 73 Old 05-23-2010
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Yeah, I wish I had a bigger frig and freezer....An oven would be nice but oh well, something to look for if I ever upgrade.

1976 Catalina 27
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post #64 of 73 Old 05-23-2010 Thread Starter
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Hey man that sounds awesome, Im actually thinking about going to a 27 foot catalina because they are very abundant and more in my price range and i can get one in better shape and save money, they are a little smaller but i agree with you the slip prices go down a lot from a 30 to a 27 and since it will be just me I think it could work out nicely. Well best of luck to you and I hope everything works out for the best.
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post #65 of 73 Old 05-23-2010
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Do it!

I'm 29 and just bought a 1976 Catalina 30 for $3300. It was a mess...but its cleaning up nicely. Very new to sailing here... I wanted a "project" boat so that I can take my time getting familiar with everything on the boat.

I climbed around a bunch of boats in the 26' to 32' range. I decided to go with the Catalina mainly because of it's beam. Not too concerned about it being a high end or low end boat...just wanted some comfort in the 30' range.

As for the cost - considering my purchase price for the boat, a pretty complete refit, and slip/storage/utility expenses...I will save thousands this year compared to last. Last year my mortgage payment alone was $2300 a month. Now I have the freedom to spend that on gear!
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post #66 of 73 Old 05-24-2010
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I noticed that the Morgan and Irwin were not listed in the ranking. I agree with the list but would be interested in where you would list these boats.
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post #67 of 73 Old 05-24-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Girlsailor44 View Post
I noticed that the Morgan and Irwin were not listed in the ranking. I agree with the list but would be interested in where you would list these boats.
Maybe they would be best placed from the middle down, but the list is not very meaningfull for older boats. My 1973 Morgan is well maintained and in constant use and upgrade. Others, far newer than mine, are neglected and of little value. It's a mistake to put to much emphasis on more then the minimal expectations of a make or model of an older boat. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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post #68 of 73 Old 05-24-2010
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I have been looking at Morgan 41 Out Islands. I was discouraged to hear some people think they are not very good offshore. They may be difficult to handle sliding down the back of a wave and are not very good sailing to windward. Do you take your Morgan offshore? How does she do? I am also looking at 38' Irwin center cockpit. Slip fees may be better for 38'. Some Marina's segregate boats by 40' above and below.
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post #69 of 73 Old 05-24-2010
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Girlsailor - From what I can tell the 382/383/384 series from Morgan is the best of their lot, at least for under 40'. Well built, good stats, and lots of space and storage.

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post #70 of 73 Old 05-25-2010
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I have been looking at Morgan 41 Out Islands. I was discouraged to hear some people think they are not very good offshore. They may be difficult to handle sliding down the back of a wave and are not very good sailing to windward. Do you take your Morgan offshore? How does she do? I am also looking at 38' Irwin center cockpit. Slip fees may be better for 38'. Some Marina's segregate boats by 40' above and below.
We do cruise offshore, often in Maine and down to the Bahamas. The Morgan OI is a heavier cruising "truck" and not a light wind performing "featherduster". I've surfed alnog the crest of a wave, but I have not experienced "sliding down the back of a wave". I don't think the momentum of my 26,000 pounds would allow this. There are compromises. The shoal draft that allows my access to many areas in the Bahamas does make my offshore ride less comfortable. Morgan OI's do exhibit less downwind performance which I have improved with a cruising chute with a 33.5' foot:


Close to the wind I can keep inside 45 degrees with winds 10-15 or more:


As Vernon's sign reads in his Hopetown grocery, "Nothing goes to windward like a 747."

Like all vessels, mine is a compromise, but it doesn't keep me from cruising offshore.

Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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