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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #11  
Old 06-29-2010
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Budget big, live small, and you can go indefinitely. My budget is a worst case scenario budget, which is going to exceed most cruisers' DAILY needs... BUT allows for a cushion for eventualities such as engine/sail/catastrophic repair replacement.

How many times have you seen boats abandoned because their owners tried to live too small, and didn't account for big expenses in their budget? yeah, you won't NEED $5k every month, but one month every three or four years you WILL NEED $10-20k to replace a dead engine, new sails, new standing rigging, etc. If you haven't allowed for those costs, you're going home, likely without your boat.
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  #12  
Old 06-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Rather than going with a 50' monohull, I'd highly recommend you look at going with something like a Chris White designed Atlantic 42 catamaran. It will have more living space than a 50' boat, and it is specifically designed to be sailed short-handed. The pilothouse and forward cockpit allow you to sail the boat relatively easily in even the worst weather in relative safety. It is probably less money than many 45-50' monohulls as well.
Second the motion! Catamarans provide you with additional privacy in addition to a saner traffic flow; with your kids and grandkids that will all be very welcome. Enjoy the whole process, though, shopping for boats and then finding one you love and then refitting to whatever your own cruising style will be are all exciting and wonderful precursors to the (bounding) main event. Stop me before I pun again...

Last edited by catamariner; 06-29-2010 at 01:11 PM. Reason: typo
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  #13  
Old 06-30-2010
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I third the "a newer boat is not necessarily problem free" sentiment. I have a friend that bought an 07 because he was tired of fixing things on his older Ranger that he had forever. The warranty company for the new boat went into bankruptcy and was taken over by the state and he had to try to get reimbursed for the problems and he had nothing but problems. The electrical system never functioned properly. The AC had to be replaced and then the boat nearly sunk in the atlantic with his family on board after something with the shaft log broke.

Also the money they are asking for new boats is pretty staggering and I don't like the styling of them. They just seem plasticky and gimmicky. But that is a personal opinion.

IMHO you are better off doing as much of the work yourself and learning as much as possible about everything on the boat. At some point something is going to break and you will need to get it working on your own or find a workaround. If you have a new boat then you are not going to have much incentive to poke around and see how things work.

If you refit an older boat you can put whatever you like into electronics and systems and have an intimate knowledge of how it works. You may end up spending as much as buying a boat with all the same things but at least you know something about it.
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  #14  
Old 07-01-2010
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Last summer we delivered a Lagoon 50, a 50 foot catamaran, from La Rochelle France (on the Atlantic coast) through the Med to Port Said , Egypt and on to the Red Sea. On board we generally had 6 to 8 people (crew and guests). Over the years we have heard how expensive cruising in Europe is and we budgeted accordingly.

The reality? Cruising in Europe is as expensive as you want it to be. Our most expensive marina cost was 180 Euro/day with metered electric and water and WIFI charge on top of that. That was in Palma de Mallorca and we could have avoided those high prices if the owener's rep had been willing to moor a little ways out of town and reserve a space in advance. Our cheapest marina cost was 0 Euro/day. We tied up to a barge in a deserted marina in Greece. No water or electricity available. Most often we paid from 35 Euro to 60 Euro/ day. (and that was with the extra tarif for catamarans)

What we learned (and were pleasantly surprised to find out) was that it is still possible to anchor throughout Europe with only a few exceptions. We met crusiers who regularily anchored out for a week or two and then came into a marina for a day or so to top up batteries and water tanks, do laundry and provision... the usual chores.

Food costs are similar to the US and often cheaper. If you shop in local markets you can eat like a king. Eating out never cost us more than 25 Euro a person for a 3 course meal with wine. But we like to ask the locals where they eat and to try to avoid "touritsy" places when we can.

If you put solar pannels, a wind generator and a water maker on your boat, you can save yourself money by being able to avoid the expensive marinas. (We had to pay 50 Euro for water in Palma de Mallorca because we arrived on the weekend of the biggest race and all the berths were full. If we had had a water maker - which the owner refused to buy - we could have saved the money and agravation and anchored out.)

We live aboard a 30 foot boat which is currently on the Red Sea. $100/month/ft is WAY OVER any amount we've ever spent!!! But then we are modest folk
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  #15  
Old 07-01-2010
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If you are sailing constantly, the boat will have more wear than you may anticipate. Count on at least 10% of the cost of the boat for yearly maintenance - sail repair, engine and genset maintenance, etc. Insurance for yourseves and the boat will also be big expenses. You will probably be in marinas more often than you anticipate. We have lived aboard for the last 7 years on our 58ft Taswell - in the Chesapeake in the Summer and the Caribbean in the Winter. I do most of the simple maintenance. Excluding debt service, we probably spend about 5-6k per month. The biggest expense is our health insurance which is close to 2k/month. Our boat is now for sale as we are moving back ashore in Sint Maarten.
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  #16  
Old 07-01-2010
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So..not counting eating out,or staying at an expensive marina, on a 23' o'day how much a month would that be i just wanna buy my boat and sail not worrying about prices,taxes,ect.Just live my life a nice and easy way.
23' O'day
Cost: 4,150 USD
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  #17  
Old 07-01-2010
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I'd point out that an ODay 23 is probably too small to be very self-sufficient in terms of water or electricity...and as such will have you running to a marina to fill the water tank or charge the batteries fairly often. The more self-sufficient a boat is, the lower the costs can be. Having a watermaker means you can often avoid buying water in remote areas. Having solar panels or a windgen often means you don't have to run the engine to re-charge the batteries or go to a marina to use shorepower to charge them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OceanSailor4 View Post
So..not counting eating out,or staying at an expensive marina, on a 23' o'day how much a month would that be i just wanna buy my boat and sail not worrying about prices,taxes,ect.Just live my life a nice and easy way.
23' O'day
Cost: 4,150 USD
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #18  
Old 07-02-2010
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To the original poster question on costs, here is our experience:

We set sail last August, 2009 from Hawaii and are now moored in Duxbury, MA. (Shout out to Sailing Dog - I said I'd look you up and I will) Our boat is a 52' Motorsailor and cost in the range you are planning. Jungle was sailed from New Zealand to Hawaii by the previous owners. All totaled; 12,392 miles sailed since last July, of which my wife and I sailed over 8,000 miles, with crew for the longer trips. We spent 6 mos. in San Diego readying Jungle for live aboard cruising at a rough cost of $70K (I planned $30-40K). We left mid-March and basically sprinted from San Diego to Boston in 3 months. This jacked up costs and we now plan to slow down to enjoy and reduce costs.

My experience is 10 months living on board and taking into consideration the first year incurs the highest costs;

Rough monthly costs;

Expense Actual Target Comments
-------- ------ ------ ----------
- Boat Ins. $750 $350 Currently using Lloyds for ocean crossing
- Health Ins. $600 $600 Will most likely increase year to year
- Food, drink $400 $200 5 crew from HI, 3 crew from San Diego
- Entertain $300 $300 We like to eat out, may be low
- Fuel $700 $200 We've been on a mission to arrive Boston
- Maint. $450 $450 Eng/Gen on high usage, always work to do
------------------------------------------------
Total/mo. $3200 $2100 I'll argue with myself - this is low

Emergency funding $20,000 (major failures)

Additional comments:
- the "make ready" will be much higher than you think (aka home remodel)
- do as much yourself as possible - critical for cruising (when no help around)
- the frequent visitors will get old and expensive - it did for us.

This said, the $2500-$5000 (net) you suggested per month should work. Final point, go do it, you won't regret it. We haven't.
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  #19  
Old 07-02-2010
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Did you guys go the Panama canal route??
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #20  
Old 07-02-2010
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SD, We did go through the canal - great trip. We were scheduled to go through in 1 day and made it to the Gutun locks (Atlantic side) from the Mira Flores locks (Pacific side) on time in 7.5 hours. However, just as we approached the ACP (Canal authority) shut down all north bound traffic to allow both sides of locks to be dedicated to southbound traffic (Pacific bound). Still a enjoyed the trip through. Here's a link and some more pics on our trip - look in May under all Panama references.
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