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  #101  
Old 11-02-2011
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no ones feathers are ruffled here at all, wow sorry we even brought anything up at all. We did not come here for anyone's advice per-say, rather some insight into what others have done. We'll pick and choose what information works for us.

Maybe my words don't sound right, never been accused of being a english major. In the end we'll keep reading and also keep to our plan and from now on keep our thoughts to ourselves. Again sorry we said a word.......................
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  #102  
Old 11-02-2011
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Guys and gals. keep in mind our comments are just our view of things. We'd never expect anyone else to want to do what we do.

Certainly no disrespect was intended at all. just because we don't wish to do as others do is just a fact, not disrespectful in any way. maybe pointing out that our parents have the rest of their lives set before them seems mean but it's true. Maybe they are 100% happy with the choices they have made maybe not. That is really non of our business. We don't go put them down, in fact we didn't here by pointing out the facts.
It may be that my comment about my daughter and her choice, different from her cruising parents, was misunderstood. She is thrilled with her independant choice as you should be with yours. The honor is in striking out for your own adventure and this is almost always exciting and different from from our parents. Others may choose as you, but the most dynamic choices will be a little different with each generation. These differences do not dishonor our parents. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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  #103  
Old 11-02-2011
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Neverknow, I think we all got off to a wrong start, so I’d like to re-wind and start again. Please forgive the long time Sail netters like myself who may appear a little jaded and cynical. Every so often, a starry eyed poster will come on this board, looking more for validation than advice. They take umbrage with the advice given, get a little combative and defensive, then do what they want. Unfortunately, often times they wind up buying the wrong boat and soon after the first problems start to develop, they abandon this board, and I assume, the sailing lifestyle they first aspired to. People here are trying to be helpful, even if they may come off a little preachy at times.

Mind if I ramble off a few random thoughts? There is a big difference between the romance and reality. Most starry eyed dreamers don’t seem to grasp this. You might have heard the old saying, “cruising is fixing your boat in exotic locations”. And unfortunately, the cost of repairs is directly proportional to the distance from your home port. Read Sequitur’s blogs for a good dose of reality (and romance too!). Second, boats are expensive (but you already know that). Remember, all boats consume dead dinosaurs. Power boats in their tanks and sailboats, their sails. The last suit of sails for my 34 footer cost northwards of $7K (and that was before $4 a gallon gas). The only thing on a sailboat that’s free is wind, everything else costs – a lot. Property on dry land appreciates, boats depreciate. We have all heard of that friend of a friend who made money when selling his boat. I don’t want to meet that guy, I want to meet his buyer! If you think you’re being insulted on this thread, wait until you get those low ball offers when you sell your boat. Sailboats have much smaller living spaces than a powerboat. You would need to get a forty foot or more sailboat to get the same spaciousness as your Carver. The fuel economy in a sailboat is only marginally better than a trawler of the same displacement. And when you’re cruising, you got tons of supplies, spare parts and what not all over the place. We keep photos of our boat on christening day just to remind us what it is supposed to look like. Blue water sailing isn’t everybody’s cup of tea. My own MrsB has twenty years of experience but absolutely refuses drive the boat at night in 30kt breezes and 10-15 swells. I only learned that nugget last year when we were about 100 NM off the coast of Baja. Wander the boatyards in places like San Carlos or Lorrieto, and you will see where too many cruiser’s dreams came to die. As patronizing as it sounds, I don’t want that to be your fate.

One final thought… Sailing is only slightly more addictive than crack cocaine! Save yourself before it is too late! God, I love it so and I cannot bear the thought of life without it. For every rotten 90 degree day you spend unclogging a marine head, there is a magical moment when everything is just perfect, the boat skipping along on a sparkling sea under sun filled skies. Enjoy the journey.
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  #104  
Old 11-02-2011
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GeorgeB

I'd like to thank you for your time. You have some great points and in site. some things we know for sure.

We will retire

It will be on a boat somewhere.

For almost 30 yrs we have had cabin cruiser type boats. We have spent untold nights/weekends and weeks living aboard.

You know how when you go to the marina in the middle of the week or every weekend and there's that one boat that there's always someone there? That us. We are always amazed at how many ppl we never see and we are always there.

I'm not sure why but working on a boat is not really work to us at all. Expensive yes but work no. A few summers ago I spent the 4th of July weekend replacing a leaking holding tank. It was gross and hot but still somehow it wasn't that bad. The bonus was I now know more about that system on a Carver 3227 than most do.

As we said before this plan of ours has been well thought out. However we know that even a war plan is changed once the first shot is fired. We have no pie in the sky visions to be ruined. We will do as we have always done take one day and one step at a time.

We have been looking for a boat around 36ft +/- 4 foot. So your 40ft est is right on our target. The fuel usage is something we have taken into account already. The wild card there is just how often will we use the engine??? We know that depends on us. We have read stories where ppl have sailed around the world without a engine at all. Clearly that won't be us.

Budgeting our monthly expenses is hard to project at this point but we are working on it every few months and comparing it to what we'll have in savings. Again wild cards are everywhere, however we are dumpster diving type ppl, so we tend to stretch every dollar for every penny we can.

Fixing a boat is not a problem for us, in fact I'll probably be fixing most other ppl's boats if they need the help. I'm kind of the go to guy for everyone I know when something is broken. It's just something I've always been extremely good at. Of coarse there's the cost of parts to consider.

We'll be starting out more than likely on the east coast or gulf coast for a few yrs learning our boat and learning to sail before setting out for the Islands. My guess is it will be yrs before we go much farther. No hurry.
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  #105  
Old 11-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neverknow View Post
.................Budgeting our monthly expenses is hard to project at this point but we are working on it...............we tend to stretch every dollar for every penny we can................We'll be starting out more than likely on the east coast or gulf coast for a few yrs learning our boat and learning to sail before setting out for the Islands. My guess is it will be yrs before we go much farther. No hurry.
Let me offer this to your budget,- Save 80% on your fuel cost!

We cruise our 41' sailboat on the East US Coast and enjoy sailing, but like many we take short days of travel and motor much of the way in the ICW. Compare these two budgets:

Cruiser A- Travels 1,000 miles on the ICW at 6 miles/gallon, therefore using 167 gallons at $3.80/gal at a total of $635 to complete the trip in two weeks from the Chesapeake to Florida. These very typical cruisers travel about seventy miles per day and their fuel cost is $318/week

Cruiser B- Travels 1,000 miles on the ICW at 6 miles/gallon, therefore using 167 gallons at $3.80/gal at a total of $635 to complete the trip in ten weeks from the Chesapeake to Florida. These less typical cruisers average about fourteen miles per day and their fuel cost is $64/week

Many east coast cruisers move north and south with the season, but fail to realize that the speed required to match the changing angle of incidence of the sun is less than ten miles per day. They rush to keep their boat unused at one location for six months and then rush to keep the boat someplace else for six months. When they remain static at these marinas or mooring fields at their destinations, they are also paying higher dock fees. We anchor out most the time and enjoy about forty ports from Maine to the Bahamas. We find that it is much more economical to not be destination bound, but to enjoy all your locations during continual cruising.

Some might readily see the flawed logic and point out that Crusier B is spending his $64/week for many more weeks, but cruiser A is spending far more than $64/week with marina fees during this same time. Take care and joy, Aythya crew

Last edited by CaptainForce; 11-03-2011 at 05:56 AM.
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  #106  
Old 11-03-2011
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Sometimes I think about living permanently in a boat but that does not survive winter. I live in a place were the sea is rough and the waves are big. In any big storm, that happens regularly in the winter, when the trees of my small garden are being blown away from the ground and the seas are all white, I think to myself: My God, how terrible should be to be on a boat right now.

The local port has big walls and sometimes they have to take all boats out of the marina when big 10m waves just pass over it causing huge turbulence and wash.

Perhaps if I lived on a sheltered place I would look at it differently but things are what they are and now the extension of my dreams in what regards living in a boat concerns only summer time, with occasional staying periods when the weather is fine, in the fall and spring. Or maybe I am too lazy, but I just like quiet winter nights by the fire listening music in a good hi-fi system.

Of course, I admire the guys that live in a boat all year, not for need but because the like it, but that is just not for me, unless I had too.

By the way, when I was 30 I was looking for an old big wooden sailboat to live in it. I had not enough money so I end up with a 25ft wooden old boat to cruise and live on the summer. Now that I know better, if I had found that boat, it would be a huge mistake. I would never manage the money to put it in a seaworthy condition and probably would have to live not were I wanted to live but on the few godforsaken places were I could have that boat without paying much for it, ugly places and I would be a slave, always working on its maintenance.

My life would probably have turned in a nightmare, I would not have the possibility to chose my pass on life and I would have the life determined by the needs of that boat that I am sure, I would love to the point of the unreasonable, as we do with our boats.

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-03-2011 at 07:19 AM.
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  #107  
Old 11-03-2011
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Neverknow, good to hear that we didn’t inadvertently “run you off”. Now, one last warning: on the long run, a crystal meth addiction will be cheaper than sailing. All your family and land friends will begin to wonder about you – and don’t be surprised if they try to stage an intervention. Be forewarned, all your new sailing friends are actually co-enablers and dependants – last warning.

Most of us “old timers” have spent a lot of time in different sailboats so we know what works for us, what our aspirations are. Everybody is different and what may work for me might not work for you. My MrsB is fond of saying “boats shrink a foot for every week aboard”. Bigger is generally better until it gets too large to handle comfortably (think about your spouse). For example, the primary winches on my 34 are 44s, they are 72s on a 44 footer. MrsB’s abilities max out at the 40-42 foot range. We have some retired friends who spend the winters in Mexico on their 36 footer (and summers travelling the US in an RV). We don’t know how they do it. Our 34 is borderline too small for what we want to do. What size gets you is more tankage, longer “legs”, more storage, and more comfortable living space. The downside is price and operating expense increases geometrically as LOA increases. They also take more to sail. For example, the primary winches on my 34 are 44s, they are 72s on a 44 footer. MrsB’s abilities max out at the 40-42 foot range.

Sadly, economics and budgets will be your deciding factor. Despite what we enablers might say, sailing and cruising will cost a lot more than you first imagine. There are no free rides, better boats cost more. Decrepit ones break down more. You see a lot more of the latter in the marinas of broken dreams. Captain Ron and Summer Rental are just movies, not real life. Don't think you can buy something on the cheap and turn it into a first class boat with just a little paint and elbow grease. Most people who go this route end up spending way more than what they would have done if they bought a bristol boat in the first place. Don’t be undercapitalized.

Amount of time motoring is subject to a lot of variables, wind, no wind, wind on the nose, etc. It is also dependant on other factors such as type and condition of your boat, and your sailing abilities. Schedule comes into play too – would you rather be bobbing around or in the next harbor where there’s ice for your drinks? For what it’s worth, on the long haul, we do about 20 percent motoring. But I’m also a racer and certified string puller so I can eke out more speed (and distance) than a rank beginner.
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  #108  
Old 11-03-2011
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i doubt theres many people who live on a boat in the u.s. because "they have to" same with homeless street people,it seems to me that if ones not contented with their particular lifestyle they will eventually find another.i also don't understand why someone who "lives" on a sailboat would be in a desperate hurry to get to a final destination,flying/driving would be faster and cheaper or hell just buy a oh oh power boat[go fast boat],and yeah i do realize there are sme desperately poor people especially in other countries
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  #109  
Old 11-03-2011
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CaptainForce

I have a question for you about the ICW. I've been reading and still a lot to read but what is the max bridge clearance or what is the mast limit if you intend on doing the ICW? What I've found so far is 55 ft, is that right? If so do most ppl try to get boat with mast under say 50ft?

Don't worry I will be getting a lot more info later just kind of wondering now.
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  #110  
Old 11-03-2011
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The ICW from Norfolk, Virginia to Miami, Florida has a mean high water clearance of 65'; therefore 64' or less will suffice. The Julia Tuttle (dyslexic engineered) bridge in Miami is 56', but it's just a 20 mile hop to bypass it outside . The Cape May Canal requires a 55'MHW clearance, but there's a passage available around the Cape. The southern New Jersey ICW is shallow and with 25' vertical clearance, so most everyone is outside from Cape May to at Least Atlantic City and outside again from Manasquan to Sandy Hook. There's much protected passage in New England, but no ICW. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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