how much clothing - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 12-02-2010
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,922
Thanks: 5
Thanked 80 Times in 74 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
I'm one who thinks the 'no cotton' rule can be overdone. Sure I want wool or synthetic/wool mix when things get exceedingly cold and wet but other than that I am not going to junk cotton for synthetic in warmer climes. Some things are simply not negotiable and wearing plastic clothing is one of them.

That said, it was with some sadness that I have had to admit that 501s and snake skin boots are not terribly practical on board.

Eryka is right....chino type pants are the go even in my opinion if cotton. Reality is that in moderate weather light weight cotton pants are not a serious problem if only because today's boats are not as damp collecting as they once were.

On my first (timber) keelboat I could not leave clothes on board for any lenght of time without mould developing or at least a nasty musty smell. On Raven in 2010 I leave some clothing on board at all times and mould and damp is simply not a major problem. Yes is can be a problem after say a rough passage combined with wet weather after but a bit of wool covers that eventuality.

Oh yes....wool or even better possum socks.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 12-02-2010
Serendipitous's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 111
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Serendipitous is on a distinguished road
Looks like I have a lot to learn about clothing from a boaters perspective. Besides knowing that foul weather gear should not be cotton, I did not know it would be a issue for everyday use. I did know that mold/mildew would be a problem for everyday storage, so I was/am planning on keeping all my clothing in plastic bags when not in use, but I did not know sitting on the boat or walking around town would be an issue with what I'm wearing. But this is also coming from a girl who spent 5 hours in soaking wet yoga pants and a fleece when crossing Lake Michigan in a storm this past summer thinking, "That kind of sucked, but so is life." (Although one reason I didn't go below to change or get foul weather gear is because everyone was sleeping and I didn't want to wake them. Selfless, or stupid, I'm still not sure which. )

I'm not looking to get a whole new wardrobe right now, all the extra money I can get is going toward our trip. I have a few synthetic blends that I'll be packing, maybe picking up a few more here or there before I go, but I think it was good advice to bring what I have and pick up more on 'the road' if I need to. And sorry QuickMick, but we're not coffee drinkers.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Jessica
Muskegon, MI
89' Sabre 34 Targa

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 12-02-2010
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,922
Thanks: 5
Thanked 80 Times in 74 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Whoever left you out in the cockpit by yourself in such unsuitable clothing should be taken out and shot, and that means the skipper. For heavens sake, it is the skippers responsibility to attend to the welfare of the crew. Failing to do so is inexcusable.

If you are going offshore or even on something as large as the Great Lakes the first thing you need is adequate wet weather gear. Jacket, Pants, Boots, Gloves. Good socks are important...preferably wool, definitely not cotton.

Some underclothing is going to be better than others but in cold though not bitterly cold weather you can get by wearing fairly normal clothes as long as your wet weather gear is quality.

Remember..good wet weather gear not only keeps you dry but also keeps you warm cos it keeps out the wind.

Spend you money on good gear but keep your cotton shirts for the Bahamas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serendipitous View Post
Looks like I have a lot to learn about clothing from a boaters perspective. Besides knowing that foul weather gear should not be cotton, I did not know it would be a issue for everyday use. I did know that mold/mildew would be a problem for everyday storage, so I was/am planning on keeping all my clothing in plastic bags when not in use, but I did not know sitting on the boat or walking around town would be an issue with what I'm wearing. But this is also coming from a girl who spent 5 hours in soaking wet yoga pants and a fleece when crossing Lake Michigan in a storm this past summer thinking, "That kind of sucked, but so is life." (Although one reason I didn't go below to change or get foul weather gear is because everyone was sleeping and I didn't want to wake them. Selfless, or stupid, I'm still not sure which. )

I'm not looking to get a whole new wardrobe right now, all the extra money I can get is going toward our trip. I have a few synthetic blends that I'll be packing, maybe picking up a few more here or there before I go, but I think it was good advice to bring what I have and pick up more on 'the road' if I need to. And sorry QuickMick, but we're not coffee drinkers.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 12-02-2010
eherlihy's Avatar
Learning the HARD way...
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Boston / Ft Myers Area
Posts: 3,659
Thanks: 124
Thanked 72 Times in 71 Posts
Rep Power: 8
eherlihy will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serendipitous View Post
Looks like I have a lot to learn about clothing from a boaters perspective. Besides knowing that foul weather gear should not be cotton, I did not know it would be a issue for everyday use. I did know that mold/mildew would be a problem for everyday storage, so I was/am planning on keeping all my clothing in plastic bags when not in use, but I did not know sitting on the boat or walking around town would be an issue with what I'm wearing. But this is also coming from a girl who spent 5 hours in soaking wet yoga pants and a fleece when crossing Lake Michigan in a storm this past summer thinking, "That kind of sucked, but so is life."
Dudes, and Dudettes,

Don't take the "Cotton Kills" thing too seriously.. It depends on where you're sailing. Cotton would be fine in tropical climates - if you have the mildew thing under control. Realize, however that if you're on a boat, you're likely to get wet. Wet jeans and a cotton sweatshirt are not comfortable, and will set you up for hypothermia, in climates where the temperature gets below 70ļ.

Kudos to Serendipitous for your concern about your crew mates. I have great respect for a girl that can suck it up.

Although, you should realize that if you put yourself in danger of getting sick / hypothermic, you are also putting your crew mates at risk. You cease to be an asset, and become a liability. With the onset of hypothermia your reactions slow, and judgement becomes impaired, Finally, if you do succumb, the crew now has to work harder to treat you, and maintain the vessel...
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

USCG Licensed OUPV Captain, ASA 101/103/104/105 Certified Instructor - Also certified in Recreational Marine Electrical Systems
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 12-02-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Aside from the hypothermic/heat loss problems with wet cotton clothing—once it gets wet, it provides little or no UV protection. A lot of the newer synthetic clothing is UPF rated and will block UV even when wet. Skin cancer is nasty stuff and UPF-rated clothes can help keep you healthy.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

óCpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

StillóDON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 12-03-2010 at 02:58 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 12-02-2010
Serendipitous's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 111
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Serendipitous is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Whoever left you out in the cockpit by yourself in such unsuitable clothing should be taken out and shot, and that means the skipper. For heavens sake, it is the skippers responsibility to attend to the welfare of the crew. Failing to do so is inexcusable.

If you are going offshore or even on something as large as the Great Lakes the first thing you need is adequate wet weather gear. Jacket, Pants, Boots, Gloves.
It was my decision to keep myself in the cockpit during that time, and no one else. I was on the 2am to 6am shift, and let my husband sleep in the extra hour because that was the only sleep he was going to get that night. Like I had mentioned, I could have gone below and changed into my foul weather gear at any time, but I knew I was in no real danger of hypothermia (it was July), and if I thought I was I would have done something about it. As eherlihy put it, I'm a girl who can suck it up. (Side note, I do have most of the wet weather gear I'd need for any storms and will pick up anything else I do not have before we leave).

Glad to know some of my cottons will still work in the Bahamas, that's where I was planning on wearing all my cotton dresses.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Jessica
Muskegon, MI
89' Sabre 34 Targa

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 12-03-2010
Boasun's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,069
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Boasun will become famous soon enough Boasun will become famous soon enough
Gesh all those years in the Navy where I wore Navy dungrees (cotton) in the north Atlantic & Pacific... According you guys I should have died a long time ago.
As long as you take precautions in your dress you will survive. But having wool clothing is a large factor in surviving in the Northern waters & Southern above 32N/S. Dress to stay warm and partake of high calorie foods do help. Your body will burn those calories off as it works to stay warm.
Of course down in the Tropics you can only take so much clothing off before the whole world either starts Laughing or gagging.
__________________
1600 Ton Master, 2nd Mate Unlimited Tonnage

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Maritime Instructor
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Rapture

Last edited by Boasun; 12-03-2010 at 08:17 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 12-03-2010
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I've always preferred natural fabrics so most of my clothing is cotton or wool. Long underwear and socks as well as other technical clothing is generally synthetic. Day-to-day living on the dock is pretty much the same as ashore.

Dinghy runs usually mean some spray so I am more careful about fabric choices in the dinghy. Still, I haven't had any issues with cotton t-shirts -- if it's going to be that wet I wear my foul weather jacket at least anyway. I don't like having a wet butt regardless of the material type so I slow down rather than get wet.

...
I wouldn't buy all new clothes (unless your looking for an excuse) until you get some experience living aboard and determine what works for you.
I think Dave's right, especially that day-to-day living at the dock is a lot like on land, and I should have been more specific about cotton. 2 places I *won't* wear cotton - (1) sticky-hot places like hiking in the Virgin Islands (it holds sweat and B.O. and just stays moist all day) and (2) cold rain or spray. OTOH, Hanging out in the Bahamas, in winter, temps about 70 - cotton T-shirts are no problem.

We often wear loose lightweight long cotton pants - surprisingly, they can be cooler than shorts in some conditions. If "wet dinghy butt" is going to be an issue, we either ride standing up or if its too rough for that, we go ashore in full foulies - which earns us some funny looks in the grocery store if its a sunny day.

BTW, Serendip, welcome to SN, our hailing port is Northport, MI and we still miss the Sweetwater Sea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 12-03-2010
QuickMick's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: California
Posts: 1,381
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 6
QuickMick is on a distinguished road
you can get good deals at these places...so money for gear and the trip!
gillna.com <-----------go to the clearance section
evo.com
sierratradingpost.com
moosejaw.com

no affiliation, just like being cozy
__________________
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean ~ Arthur C. Clarke

Quinn McColly
Macgregor Venture
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 12-03-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 13
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
SailingGma is on a distinguished road
Whatever you choose, take less rather than more. Although we took a hand wringer so we could wash clothes onboard, we found (in Mexico, Central and South America) that it was usually easy to find someone who did laundry, for a reasonable price. Sometimes boys came out to the anchored boat to solicit such services. In humid tropic areas, everything gets sweaty within an hour of putting it on, so we tended to wear the same thing over and over anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Clothing Maverick1958 General Discussion (sailing related) 10 12-21-2009 09:51 AM
how much clothing will we need daddyhobbit Living Aboard 15 12-18-2007 01:20 PM
What type of clothing to buy hophiphop Gear & Maintenance 8 07-26-2007 05:35 PM
Cold Weather Clothing Bob Merrick Learning to Sail Articles 0 02-24-2004 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:11 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.