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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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Old 12-08-2010
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Plates, glasses, etc...

So do most liveaboards/cruisers use plastic dishes and the like? If you use breakable stuff, how do you secure it? Been curious about this as I have seen interior pics of boats for sale that have wine glasses hanging from a rack and I am thinking you would not do that while underway. I know the pics could be a bit of window dressing too.
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Old 12-08-2010
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Our fine polycarbonate goblets hang from a rack, outboard of the table below, with a strap to keep them in their slots. You can sort of see the rack in this shot, starboard of the can of peanuts and just below the fishing lure. (don't ask)
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Old 12-08-2010
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there's a long thread out there in SailNet Void on this very subject...probably more than one I'd guess....

OK , we are not liveaboards but we do spend most weekends on board plus a month or so each year. Most times we take the boat out it is ultimately to sleep over.

While we have a set of melamine dinnerware and glasses for rough weather, wehn at anchor or in calm waters we use the real thing including wine glasses. In the going on six years we have had Raven our total losses are two wine glasses, no plates, cups, no mugs. Ironically enough both glasses bit the dust when we were at anchor. I won't name names (cos she will beat me up if I do) but a certain female crew member has a tendency to misjudge the distance from hand to table top when she is in her cups.

Quite frankly I see no need whatsoever to endure plastic unless absolutely necessary and if the weather is so bad that plastic is the go then we are probably reduced to tinned soups and toasted bacon sarnies anyway.

That said, we are a crew of two and rarely have guests for other than day sails. Children and extra crew could well mean a different strategy.
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Old 12-08-2010
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We are not liveaboards yet, but planning to be soon...

Because we have kids, we stay away from glass on board. Not so much because the kids are more likely to break them, but because if there is a break, kids are more likely to step on a piece of glass, or at least harder to deal should they get cut. If we did not have kids, I do not know if we would have glass or not. I do have two plastic goblets on board, but I do not like them very much.

For plates and bowls we have Corelle dishes which are not plastic, but hard as all get out to break. I grew up on a farm with 3 unruly boys and we had a very hard time breaking these dishes, plus they are very thin, so they store nicely. They usually have to be dropped hard on a hard surface and hit just right on the edge to break them. The down side to Corelle is if they do break they shatter and splinter into very fine pieces which are a pain to clean up. This goes contrary to my feelings about glass on board, but the risk of breakage is greatly reduced so I am comfortable with it for now. Plus I hate plastic plates.
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Old 12-09-2010
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If SWBMO reads this, I see the Fuzzy one getting a good beating...

Properly stowage will allow you to use stoneware or Corelle type plates and bowls on a boat. Racks are better than stowing them on a shelf. Bins with lids work well to, if properly secured.

However, I think the lucite or polycarbonate stemware makes sense on a boat, since cleaning up the glass when you break a wine glass really sucks, especially if you're used to going about the boat barefoot.

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Originally Posted by tdw View Post
there's a long thread out there in SailNet Void on this very subject...probably more than one I'd guess....

OK , we are not liveaboards but we do spend most weekends on board plus a month or so each year. Most times we take the boat out it is ultimately to sleep over.

While we have a set of melamine dinnerware and glasses for rough weather, wehn at anchor or in calm waters we use the real thing including wine glasses. In the going on six years we have had Raven our total losses are two wine glasses, no plates, cups, no mugs. Ironically enough both glasses bit the dust when we were at anchor. I won't name names (cos she will beat me up if I do) but a certain female crew member has a tendency to misjudge the distance from hand to table top when she is in her cups.

Quite frankly I see no need whatsoever to endure plastic unless absolutely necessary and if the weather is so bad that plastic is the go then we are probably reduced to tinned soups and toasted bacon sarnies anyway.

That said, we are a crew of two and rarely have guests for other than day sails. Children and extra crew could well mean a different strategy.
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When we moved aboard, Dan said that if we use those plastic (melamine) dishes every day, it'll feel like we're camping out. We use plain white Corelle, platters stacked one edge (but not bungeed in) in a dish cabinet - in 8+ years as fulltime liveaboards we chipped one edge of one plate. Polycarbonate stemware hangs in a wineglass rack just like in the glossy brochure photos.

We had a fairly casual lifestyle even when we lived on land, so that colored our choices when we moved aboard. While plastic or paper plates would feel like camping out - this is our only home, after all - stressing over fine china would not be fun either. (Agree with SD's point about cleaning up broken glass.) Bottom line, though: WHO you're drinking your wine with, is more important that which wineglasses you're drinking it FROM. Get servingware you don't need to worry about.
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Well said Eryka.

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WHO you're drinking your wine with, is more important that which wineglasses you're drinking it FROM. Get servingware you don't need to worry about.
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 12-09-2010
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When we were living aboard last year, we bought wood plates and bowls to use onboard. They are durable and very "yachty" looking. I believe we bought ours at Whole Foods (they were bamboo) and also got a few serving plates to go with them for happy hour appetizers.

For drinks we were basic - aluminum coffee mugs with lids for the morning coffee and plastic cups for everything else. Our boat is only 29 feet, so we didn't have storage space to protect anything breakable.
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Old 12-09-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
If SWBMO reads this, I see the Fuzzy one getting a good beating...

Properly stowage will allow you to use stoneware or Corelle type plates and bowls on a boat. Racks are better than stowing them on a shelf. Bins with lids work well to, if properly secured.

However, I think the lucite or polycarbonate stemware makes sense on a boat, since cleaning up the glass when you break a wine glass really sucks, especially if you're used to going about the boat barefoot.
Exactly.

We did use Corelle for some time--many years--but after a few episodes where we forgot to store some plates and bowls (forgotten after a party with guests at night, and then lost in odd corners in the morning) we've gone back to plastic. When the TINY shards get under the sole it is not a pretty thing.

Corelle will work, but you have to be careful. Boats can throw things around a lot harder than you would at home.
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Old 12-09-2010
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Corelle is great stuff...but when it breaks, it really sucks... glasses are worse, and glass stemware is the worst of all...

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Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
Exactly.

We did use Corelle for some time--many years--but after a few episodes where we forgot to store some plates and bowls (forgotten after a party with guests at night, and then lost in odd corners in the morning) we've gone back to plastic. When the TINY shards get under the sole it is not a pretty thing.

Corelle will work, but you have to be careful. Boats can throw things around a lot harder than you would at home.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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