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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #11  
Old 09-20-2011
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Really can't see how working while living aboard can be compared to being in prison without the free weights? Seems like a great "transitional" phase to me.
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Old 09-20-2011
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I'm not living aboard, so I'm talking completely out of my arse here, but it seems to me that if you have a conventional "job" that you commute to every day, the biggest hassle may be that you have to maintain two separate wardrobes: One casual, and one professional. Additional clothing and footware can take up a lot of valuable room.

Otherwise as i2f says, how is it any different than driving to work from your shore-based home?

I only participated in this thread because it's something that I'm also considering. I had started a separate thread inquiring as to whether or not many marinas offered a small, shoreside storage unit to liveaboards. It was my intention to obtain a small storage unit for things such as heavy tools and different wardrobes (seasonal, professional, casual, etc). I don't want a dock condo, I want my boat to be sea-ready at all times so that means not junking it up with a ton of tools that would otherwise be very handy for long-term boat maintenance or a bunch of extraneous clothing that is required to make a living, but not for sailing.

Savvy?
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  #13  
Old 09-20-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
I had started a separate thread inquiring as to whether or not many marinas offered a small, shoreside storage unit to liveaboards. It was my intention to obtain a small storage unit for things such as heavy tools and different wardrobes (seasonal, professional, casual, etc). I don't want a dock condo, I want my boat to be sea-ready at all times so that means not junking it up with a ton of tools that would otherwise be very handy for long-term boat maintenance or a bunch of extraneous clothing that is required to make a living, but not for sailing.

Savvy?
There are a number of Marinas that offer "dock boxes"
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  #14  
Old 09-20-2011
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I have no problem fitting all my work and play clothes aboard. My wife swaps hers out each season. Our marina offers no storage but we do rent a unit locally.

For us it is really not much different than when we were shore based. Except, we only own 1 car now, walk to work and our home is where we decide to park it.
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  #15  
Old 09-20-2011
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Get a van, or minivan.
My Volvo wagon works well for me.
And I prefer hook ( mooring ball) to marina - I can burn as much wood in my stove as I like , also paddling my kayak to a car gives nice boost of energy every morning.
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Old 09-20-2011
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Originally Posted by Stede View Post
I read a comment either here or another board that went something like this: 'Working while living aboard is kind of like being in prison minus the free weights and library."
I see this thread is fairly old but has been revived.

I have no liveaboard experience, yet. However; I suspect like most things, the answer is, it depends. I can imagine where living at anchor and having to wear a suit to an onshore job everyday would be miserable. I can equally imagine that doing the same thing from a dock might be just fine.

I am hoping/expecting to be living and "tele-commuting" aboard my 34', fairly well equiped Hunter (while moored in south Florida) in the next year. Again, I have no actual experience but this seems reasonable to me. I believe the mooring will provide a reasonable shower/bath, dingy dock, and WiFi - none of which are very "reliable" when at anchor. I doubt this would be very enjoyable on a 20' vessel (for example).

My point is that there seems to be alot of variables that need to be considered.

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Old 09-20-2011
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Workamper again

I was unclear when I said the Workamper service is free. Job seekers can choose from levels of membership that are about $15 and up. However, the deal is between the employer and employee. Job seekers do not pay a commission. Sorry for the confusion.

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Workamper has five levels of membership so it's possible you are getting only the basic access. Upper level members get the Hotline and hop on the good jobs really fast. In this economy, we must be nimble. Thanks for your comment.
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  #18  
Old 09-20-2011
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"the biggest hassle may be that you have to maintain two separate wardrobes: One casual, and one professional. "

I must be dense. What's living aboard got to do with wardrobes? You put on a three-piece suit to work in an office, do you lounge around at home watching the tv or mowing the yard in the same wardrobe?

You jerk burgers at McD's and put on a different color "suit"...Do you wear that one at home too? Crash pad, crib, or boat?

If you need "working cloths" it doesn't matter if you're a banker or a painter, or where you live, you still need work cloths versus the fuzzy bunny slippers that some folks can wear all day.

And hey, do you have any idea what those genuine antiskid marine grade fuzzy bunny slippers COST?!
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Old 09-20-2011
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I rather enjoy the row to shore, although for the last year and 1/2 I've gotten spoiled by having a very dependable ouboard. The only issue I have presently is that my child and first mate have not yet chosen to master the dinghy and all it's nuances, leaving me to pay the big marina fees when I find 40hr. The flip side is the relative feeling of safety of the craft and crew while away at work, knowing all is well.
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Old 09-23-2011
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I`ve got plenty of room for all my clothes, work and casual. Not a problem. I moved on board 6 months ago and my only regret is not having done it sooner.
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