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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-19-2013 11:15 AM
zeehag
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

mine now are only chicago cutlery, they last ok on a boat , but i use stone when i need to and the wand thingie most of the time, and i can cut tomatoes and mangos easily...and chicken dissection, fish fillet...just use the wand thingie every time you use knife, both sides of blade, and should be ok. when in doubt--find a chef and request instruction.
04-19-2013 10:50 AM
hellosailor
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

jd-
A good steel like the Wusthof is all you will need, the trick is changing your habits to use it. If you grab a knife from the block (you do have a block, right?) with your right hand, you grab the steel with your left. Whick-whick, whick-whick, whick-whick, and put the steel back before you go any further. That way the knife is always freshly sharpened when you take it out. For most of us "civilians" who aren't putting a lot of miles on our knives that is all it needs. As to getting the angle consistant, which is probably more important than what the particular angle is, that's a matter of some practice. Keep at it for a week or two and it becomes habit, and you won't even notice you are doing it any more.
There are many ways to keep blades sharp and some folks prefer one to the other, but a quick pass with the steel is perhaps the simplest, cheapest way to go.
04-19-2013 10:35 AM
chef2sail
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jd1 View Post
I got the good knives but the proper sharpening of them is still a black art. I have yet to decide if I want to use stones (can't seem to get a consistent angle) or something like this Edge Pro Apex Knife Sharpening System, Kit #4 :: Knife Sharpeners which gives consistent angles. (thoughts?)
Damn that's expensive. A lot of kitchens have a 3 stone sharpening system. I have this one at home also.

Once you have good knives and get a good edge on them I probably only use the stones once or twice a year. The trick is to keep the edge on them honing them with a diamond steel all the time

Norton 3 Stone IM200 System

Wusthof Industrial Diamond-Steel Knife Sharpener - 9" - Save 36%

The trick is the angle and the correct pressure front and back side of the knife. Do it slow. Speed comes with repetitions. ''I don't recommend electric sharpeners as they take off to much of the steel of the knife and eventually it gets bowed and is useless
04-19-2013 09:50 AM
Jd1
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

I got the good knives but the proper sharpening of them is still a black art. I have yet to decide if I want to use stones (can't seem to get a consistent angle) or something like this http://www.paulsfinest.com/Edge-Pro-...tem-Kit-4.html which gives consistent angles. (thoughts?)
04-19-2013 08:24 AM
zeehag
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jd1 View Post
Ever tried to slice up a ripe tomatoe with a straight knife ? Pain in the petunia unless you really know how to sharpen the knife to a razor like sharpness. Of course you would NEVER use a serrated knife for cutting meat products.
Cutting fresh bread is another thing that is tough to do with straight knives.
mebbe you dont have the good knives....i do not own a serated knife. they are germ catchers and bacteria farms and donot cut anything nicely except fingers.
my straight knives will cut tomatoes, mangos, meats, everything with a nice, true cut, not a ragged serrated cut.

but i have had practice and training from a home economics major and 4h members in my family--all gooood cooks and farmers of apples and sailors...as well as engineers and such--lots of guidance for knife sharpening. grandpoppa used to shave dry without mirror and using a straight razor--never missed---gotta have good blades for that.

there is no reason not to have good knives, and sharp, on hand.
04-18-2013 11:20 PM
chef2sail
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Tomatoes are god's way of reminding you to sharpen your knife.

I've only needed a serrated bread knife once, when I accidentally baked one loaf of bread with an armored crust.

chef, using a scale (and why does it measure "pounds decimal" without being able to show ounces?) doesn't ensure honesty. We've got a law that all weights have to be tared--but the shops never tare the purchase, and the enforcement department only questions that when someone wants a payoff at an inspection. Yes, that happens regularly.

For me, if I order a pint of whatever-salad, that means I want one pint container, full up, and I could care less what it weighs. I just want it full. If the counterman doesn't fill it, or fills it with olives and juice instead of just the olives, I can see it and let him know. I don't care if he charges by weight, as long as I can order by volume. The new generation behind the counter? Hell, they don't even know which is the pint container, even though it says "16 ounces - one pint" on the bottom.

That was also part of the art of personal service: If you went in to a shop regularly and they counterman had any brains, any time you ordered a pound of something, he'd let it go slightly OVER on the scale, your bonus for being recognized as a customer. You both knew you were looking at the scale.

So there are pros and cons to the new system, and the pensioners who order just a quarter pound of something and then get charged for the plastic or paper when it isn't tared? Yeah, they're getting shortchanged even with the fancy new scale. Some things don't change.

BPA: OK, maybe I should re-examine wooden boats. (VBG) But when it comes to what I eat, I have some easy choices and once of them is to just avoid the chemicals whenever I can. If I used a one-liter pop bottle instead of a cooling gizmo, voila, no BPAs. But if I want to cool a turkey quickly? Nah, I'm just going to throw it in the freezer. One-trick ponies aren't for me, the stable isn't big enough.
A good bread knife can insure identical slices and aid in speed of cutting of bread which helps in consistency with items like bruschetta and tasks with precision. Choice of tools in the kitchen ( knives) are important top accomplishing tasks ( boning- 2 types meat and fish), carving, slicing, dicing, butchering) as the correct tool when taking a nut off a bolt. Ratchet, pliers, open end wrench, vice grips, torque wrench.

The trick to cooling is cut into small pieces or divide into multiple pans.

To cool the turkey correctly....break it down into breasts thighs..etc It will cool quickly then.

Hey use the glass frozen pop bottle. No BPA and the concepts the same to drive the temp down quickly'- Glad we agree on the technique

Not to complicate things
,
You realize that the pint measure ( by 16 oz ) is really a liquid measure and that the cole slaw is measuring a volume. The conversion factor for a liquid measure of a pint is as follows 1 pint dry volume= 1.163 pints liquid measure.

Many times people who don't understand this also screw up when baking between liquid and dry measure.
Liquid and Dry Measurement Equivalents

I of course understand and agree the younger generation may not understand the vanishing pint volume measure.

As far as to tare the purchase that must be done. Our scales are modern and in supermarkets here the tare weights of different containers are already programmed into the scales. That's why sometimes the counter person cannot give you a different container. These tare weights are part of the inspection process by the county and state governments here. You should major complain if they aren't there.

Scales where I live have to be and are checked by the state every 6 months and convey inspection stickers on them,
04-18-2013 07:41 PM
hellosailor
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Tomatoes are god's way of reminding you to sharpen your knife.

I've only needed a serrated bread knife once, when I accidentally baked one loaf of bread with an armored crust.

chef, using a scale (and why does it measure "pounds decimal" without being able to show ounces?) doesn't ensure honesty. We've got a law that all weights have to be tared--but the shops never tare the purchase, and the enforcement department only questions that when someone wants a payoff at an inspection. Yes, that happens regularly.

For me, if I order a pint of whatever-salad, that means I want one pint container, full up, and I could care less what it weighs. I just want it full. If the counterman doesn't fill it, or fills it with olives and juice instead of just the olives, I can see it and let him know. I don't care if he charges by weight, as long as I can order by volume. The new generation behind the counter? Hell, they don't even know which is the pint container, even though it says "16 ounces - one pint" on the bottom.

That was also part of the art of personal service: If you went in to a shop regularly and they counterman had any brains, any time you ordered a pound of something, he'd let it go slightly OVER on the scale, your bonus for being recognized as a customer. You both knew you were looking at the scale.

So there are pros and cons to the new system, and the pensioners who order just a quarter pound of something and then get charged for the plastic or paper when it isn't tared? Yeah, they're getting shortchanged even with the fancy new scale. Some things don't change.

BPA: OK, maybe I should re-examine wooden boats. (VBG) But when it comes to what I eat, I have some easy choices and once of them is to just avoid the chemicals whenever I can. If I used a one-liter pop bottle instead of a cooling gizmo, voila, no BPAs. But if I want to cool a turkey quickly? Nah, I'm just going to throw it in the freezer. One-trick ponies aren't for me, the stable isn't big enough.
04-18-2013 07:28 PM
chef2sail
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jd1 View Post
Ever tried to slice up a ripe tomatoe with a straight knife ? Pain in the petunia unless you really know how to sharpen the knife to a razor like sharpness. Of course you would NEVER use a serrated knife for cutting meat products.
Cutting fresh bread is another thing that is tough to do with straight knives.
Most professional bread knives are serrated and if ever cut by one leaves a hard to heal flap/

Tomatoes should be able to be cut by your French knife. If you can it may 1) not be sharp enough 2) needs to be honed to line up the molecules on the edge with a steel after ech use.

Dave
04-18-2013 06:27 PM
chef2sail
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Of course, when I was a kid I could order a PINT of coleslaw and get it. Today? That's illegal in many states, and the coutner help doesn't know what a pint is. They're required to sell by the pound, even though they still use pint containers.

You may use an ice paddle (interesting that the vendor calls it a wand, not a paddle) to chill things, but I can assure you the local diner and restaurant don't. These places have cooks, not chefs, and if you are lucky the cook doesn't let the cat walk on the counter.

And please don't use that particular ice wand in my food, apparently it is polycarbonate, which means it will still be leaching BPAs into the food..
It shows ignorance is bliss. When people don't know any better they cant know when quality or changes occur when benefit them. Come on man...its the 21st century now...move forward with it or get left behind

Did it ever occur to you that the weight measurement in the coleslaw case actually benefitted you in that you paid for what you got. No unscrupulous vendor or un qualified deli counter person could fill the container a little short and still charge you the pint price. The way they are charging is consistent with the prepackaged Cole slaw I am sure. With the density of so many objects put into containers you need a price list a mile long. By weight simplifies it.

I wish they would do the same for ice cream. Selling by volume allows them to sell you air ( overrun).

Ice Wands/ Ice Paddles same thing. In commercial kitchens they have much larger than 128 oz containers and some are called paddles. Notice this one is called a paddle

That's pretty amusing you'd worry about BPAs leeching out into your food and the environment as you sail around encased in your epoxy, resin fiberglass plastic sailboat, made of the finest chemicals known to man and preserving a safe environment.

If we examined your home kitchen/ galley I am sure wed find more harmful metals and ingredients in your cookware than youd ever find in these wands/ paddles. Your diet probably contains more harmful ingredients than the containers it comes in.

What are the BPA myths? | Facts About BPA
Bisphenol A (BPA): Use in Food Contact Application
04-18-2013 11:51 AM
hellosailor
Re: Restoring those plastic sink cover cutting board things...

chef, I think he was proud of what he did and how he did it--in contrast to the way the industry was run then. Bear in mind that was a time when "good sanitation" meant that evey diner, grocer, butcher or restaurant kept a CAT in the store to keep down the mice. You got a cat wandering around on the countertops in your restuarants? I don't think so, even though I've seen more than one and I've seen health inspectors ignoring them.

Of course, when I was a kid I could order a PINT of coleslaw and get it. Today? That's illegal in many states, and the coutner help doesn't know what a pint is. They're required to sell by the pound, even though they still use pint containers.

You may use an ice paddle (interesting that the vendor calls it a wand, not a paddle) to chill things, but I can assure you the local diner and restaurant don't. These places have cooks, not chefs, and if you are lucky the cook doesn't let the cat walk on the counter.

And please don't use that particular ice wand in my food, apparently it is polycarbonate, which means it will still be leaching BPAs into the food. Is that any worse than dropping a steak, brushing it off, and putting it back on the plate? Maybe not. I've seen dropped food picked back up in "respected" kitchens. Doubtlessly not in yours--but the local McBurger franchise IS in the same industry you are in, aren't they? Somewhere in between, is reality. That doesn't mean you're playing on the same level, just that you're in the same general line of business.

"Black cat, white cat, all same, all catch mice." See? Chairman Mao was in the food business, too.
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