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  Topic Review (Newest First)
20 Hours Ago 08:05 AM
Minnewaska
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I've only once picked up a line (other than on an outboard as a kid). Under power, about 30 miles offshore somewhere off NH or northern MA. Don't recall exactly. Dead calm seas, no wind, few hundred feet deep. Had been motoring for hours. Saw it at the last minute and made the mistake of trying to turn. One's first response in that situation should be pulling back to neutral.

I have a shaft line cutter (Spurs), but it did not automatically severe the line. I did pull to neutral, after wrapping, then tried to reengage in forward to see if it would cut, but I just heard it bang (presumably the float). I then tried reverse and heard an instant loud clunk and the float came out from under the boat. Off I went. One theory is it was a previously cut float and line that was adrift. Although, I have sailed through a lobster pot field, with radar reflectors, that were 20 miles offshore of Maine in hundreds of feet of water (at 4am). I thought I was far enough offshore, in the dark, to intentionally miss them. I had even slowed our approach to make landfall at dawn to be able to see them. There's just no outsmarting the lobstermen in Maine.
21 Hours Ago 07:42 AM
outbound
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

My bad Tayana 37-one of Bob's. Up here we have lobster pots up the wazoo. In Maine not uncommonly in fairly deep waters. In Rhode Island commonly with nothing more then a milk bottle or two as a float. Also when crossing the bays you may run into the occasional fish traps or lobster traps buoyed at the ends but hard to see. Add in all the polypropylene rope just floating around there's a bunch to hit.

But the most expensive mistake involved a winter stick in Marion MA harbor. At the time had a psc34. Came into the harbor in the evening with heavy cloud cover and no moon. Although it was summer there was a winter stick floating on its side with thin cable/rope down to a mooring. Color of wood and that of water nearly the same in that light and didn't expect a winter stick in the middle of the summer. Ran over it and sucked it in. Goodbye to a expensive Maxprop. Hello to a tow, haul and yard bill.

When a line jams between hull and rudder it's a bear to get out. Doesn't matter full keel, spade whatever. Of interest regardless of type of appendages all mishaps have been under power not sail. Wonder if that's other folks experience?
22 Hours Ago 06:36 AM
SVAuspicious
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
Worse, it seems half of the floats these days are painted black instead of an easy to spot color such as white or red.
The black ones make me nuts. Why do they think that is a good idea?
1 Day Ago 11:00 PM
eko_eko
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I thought T37 meant Tayana 37 in this context. It's one of Bob's.
1 Day Ago 09:21 PM
Lazerbrains
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I am familiar with the Blackwatch, and the T37. And you are right, I am younger than the Blackwatch, and they are quite rare on the west coast. I did once see a gorgeous one that sails out of San Diego - beautiful boat that looked like a full-time job to keep up with the brightwork. Is that what you had Outbound?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
You must be younger than Outbound or myself.

The first T37 was full keel - designed by Hood and first built in 1965. Available with fiberglass cabin as T37 or Black Watch with mahogany cabin.

Black Watch below.



Link to details: BLACK WATCH 37 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
1 Day Ago 09:11 PM
aeventyr60
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Unfortunately, catching lines around my prop is a regular experience in Asia. Nobody is immune from it here. I carry a couple of serrated swiss army steak knives just for this. Sometimes I can catch the change in pitch and normal shaft sound before it get's too tight and shut the motor down. Some time a quick blast of reverse will cast the line free. Other times the engine will shut down. Very small gap between the shaft anode and shaft housing, small line gets wound up in that space, has to be cut out.

As well as line, I've had plastic bags, rice sacks and a whole host of other debris caught in the prop.. Indonesia was the worst.
1 Day Ago 09:10 PM
Capt Len
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Up this coast it can be prawn trap floats pulled under by 5 or 6 knts of current If you don't realize your sidways over ground you stand a good chance of meeting a rope. Hanging by your stern in the dark till slack or until the tug and log boom comes thru can be testing
1 Day Ago 09:09 PM
mitiempo
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
T37 as in Tartan? That's not a full keel with a prop in an aperture - fin keel with skeg and exposed prop.
You must be younger than Outbound or myself.

The first T37 was full keel - designed by Hood and first built in 1965. Available with fiberglass cabin as T37 or Black Watch with mahogany cabin.

Black Watch below.



Link to details: BLACK WATCH 37 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
1 Day Ago 08:39 PM
Lazerbrains
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

T37 as in Tartan? That's not a full keel with a prop in an aperture - fin keel with skeg and exposed prop.

At any rate, to Jeff's experience, I would think it would be easier to get the line out of the rudder/keel gap then removing one entwined around a prop . A float can't jam the line up in there with anywhere near the force of the winding action of a prop, and can't be wound around multiple times. Furthermore, a line winding around a shaft will bind up the shaft and can potentially cause more damage than just temporarily disabling the boat. And if it misses the prop, it can still catch on your rudder.

Obviously the best thing is to avoid the crab pots when possible. I'm amazed I've never hit one - when lobster season rolls around here, the commercial guys literally set them up immediately outside the harbor gate - it is a minefield if you get stuck in it. Worse, it seems half of the floats these days are painted black instead of an easy to spot color such as white or red.
1 Day Ago 08:38 PM
Capt Len
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

SS finger bridging the keel/rudder gap is a bonus if transiting the trap grounds. Grew up with propeller guard cages on gillnetters and seiners.
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