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  Topic Review (Newest First)
1 Hour Ago 09:29 PM
hellsop
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic30 View Post
Actually, Bob, by using a modern hybrid drive (electric motor, controller and generator) designers like yourself have an enormous amount of flexibility with these variables. Being able to stick the maintenance-free shoe-box sized motor down in the bilge with a straight run to the prop and the engine/generator where you can actually get at it (not just in line with the prop) makes life a heck of a lot easier than it used to be..
Reliable thrust bearings are the tricky parts with those. Remember all the issues cruise ships have had with azipods? Most of them are thrust bearing failing FAR earlier than expected. Obviously, a sailboat's going to put a lot less time and strain on them in general, but most motors are designed for the rotational twist and lateral force, not force up the axis.
2 Hours Ago 08:14 PM
hellsop
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Turns out the engine is made by a Japanese outfit named Shibauhara (sp?), and is one of the most popular light industrial/tractor engines in the world, the same one used by companies like Massey-Ferguson and New Holland in many of their products...
Shibaura, a cooperative venture between Toshiba and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, a ship-building firm. They build a LOT of rebadged engines.
2 Hours Ago 08:02 PM
seaner97
Quote:
Originally Posted by seaner97 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobperry View Post
Seaner:
I don't recall that outburst. I can imagine myself saying it. It could have been the Tayana Bingham FANTASIA double ender. I would feel comfortable saying that about that boat. I just think it's an awful design,,,,by my criteria. Which I trust.

If someone out there owns one I'm really sorry I said that. But I feel obliged to be honest in the world of never ending BS.
Oh damn, you're going to make me find it?! It was in reference to some young buck considering a Ty37 with thin teak decks with many plugs missing. Maybe Mike O can help out, as I think he chimed in. Considering you designed it, I thought it might be enlightening to see what you thought the issues are and what you learned from it that would have you say that.
Here you go:
http://tracker.sailnet.com/forums/bo...postid=2936138
3 Hours Ago 06:41 PM
seaner97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobperry View Post
Seaner:
I don't recall that outburst. I can imagine myself saying it. It could have been the Tayana Bingham FANTASIA double ender. I would feel comfortable saying that about that boat. I just think it's an awful design,,,,by my criteria. Which I trust.

If someone out there owns one I'm really sorry I said that. But I feel obliged to be honest in the world of never ending BS.
Oh damn, you're going to make me find it?! It was in reference to some young buck considering a Ty37 with thin teak decks with many plugs missing. Maybe Mike O can help out, as I think he chimed in. Considering you designed it, I thought it might be enlightening to see what you thought the issues are and what you learned from it that would have you say that.
4 Hours Ago 06:01 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic30 View Post
Actually, Bob, by using a modern hybrid drive (electric motor, controller and generator) designers like yourself have an enormous amount of flexibility with these variables. Being able to stick the maintenance-free shoe-box sized motor down in the bilge with a straight run to the prop and the engine/generator where you can actually get at it (not just in line with the prop) makes life a heck of a lot easier than it used to be..
On my boats , if I could put the motor anywhere I wanted, the best place for it would still be where it is , under the front end of the cockpit.
5 Hours Ago 05:14 PM
bobperry
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Seaner:
I don't recall that outburst. I can imagine myself saying it. It could have been the Tayana Bingham FANTASIA double ender. I would feel comfortable saying that about that boat. I just think it's an awful design,,,,by my criteria. Which I trust.

If someone out there owns one I'm really sorry I said that. But I feel obliged to be honest in the world of never ending BS.
5 Hours Ago 04:54 PM
seaner97
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Bob- somewhere in here you said you'd throw yourself across the dock to keep someone from buying a Ty37 (and some other boat I can't remember). Care to tell us why?
6 Hours Ago 04:35 PM
bobperry
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

You have two stubby little rudders not vertical with no chance of prop wash even if you do want it. It's not going to work very well at all.
6 Hours Ago 04:08 PM
Jeff_H
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Regarding bowthrusters I fully agree and I will add that the more efficient type of rudders used on modern beamy boats with large transoms (twin rudders) are a lot less effective on docking maneuvers than the classic single deep rudder and in this case it will be irrelevant to be a classic transmission or a sail drive one.
Very good point that had not occurred to me.

Jeff
8 Hours Ago 01:57 PM
PCP
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
...
But I am less comfortable with the idea that separating the prop from the rudder is a good thing in low speed maneuvers. It is still very helpful in turning the boat to be able to send a blast of propwash over the rudder and spin the stern. I have come think that the current trend towards installing bow thrusters on ever smaller boats, is in part a response to the wider spread use of saildrives, along with the philosophy of making things easy for someone who has not learned the techniques and who is not willing to expend the energy to do things the more traditional ways.

Jeff
Regarding bowthrusters I fully agree and I will add that the more efficient type of rudders used on modern beamy boats with large transoms (twin rudders) are a lot less effective on docking maneuvers than the classic single deep rudder and in this case it will be irrelevant to be a classic transmission or a sail drive one.
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