SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Winged keel
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Winged keel Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
05-03-2013 06:31 PM
Jiminri
Re: Winged keel

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post

I am curious on how you guys do it on the East Coast. Is the really skinny water at entrances and you guys work your way in under motor? What is your average depth while sailing? We like to find “shallow” water to anchor in (usually 15-20’). My record anchoring depth was 96’!
If I'm anchoring in 15' of water, I'm probably asking myself why I picked a spot that is so darned exposed. I normally anchor in 7' to maybe 9' (I draw 4'). When sailing, I start paying attention when the depth gauge shows 10' or less. I really like to be in water deeper than 25', but that's because there are far fewer crab pots and pound nets that deep. A lot of the Chesapeake is just a big puddle. Beautiful, but not deep.
05-02-2013 04:27 PM
krisscross
Re: Winged keel

I have a small boat with a swing keel that I sail on Pamlico Sound where the deepest water is 25 feet. Tides are irrelevant here but wind direction can change the water depth sometimes by as much as 2 feet. The inlets are treacherous, with strong currents and always changing sandbars. Sometimes I crew on bigger boats and I swear to myself never get a big boat with draft over 5 feet. You have to be really alert when entering most protected anchorages as the channels are really narrow and water is black like strong tea, so 2 feet of water has the same color as 10 feet. But there are the rewards too, and I know plenty of secluded anchoring spots where you can be on anchor for 3 days and never run into another human being. There is so much wildlife around you it is pure magic, especially at night. You read a good book at the kerosene lamp light, listening to all these sounds... and then you turn in and listen even closer... the wind moves the boat ever so slightly and the moonlight dances in the cabin... that is hard to top...
05-02-2013 04:03 PM
Cruisingdad
Re: Winged keel

I think wing keels are much more difficult to get off than a fin!! You have a lot more options (and easy ones) with a fin than a wing. If you heel your boat over on your wing, you actually may be increasing your draft. However, Sometimes I do that anyways because the keel seems to have some kind of a suction on the bottom. THat is my theory anyways!!

George - yep, the water is really skinny here. We often come into channels where we don't have a foot under us. The ICW is supposed to be maintained to 7, but I have still bumped in it. The water under my keel right now in Boot Key is about 2 feet. I have a 6 foot draft. This is a pain. I cannot imagine having more!!

Brian
05-02-2013 03:27 PM
jimgo
Re: Winged keel

My average depth in Great Egg Bay (I was in the back bay) in NJ was 1-2' at low tide, 4-7' at high tide. Barnegat Bay is 5-7' in most places with about a 6-12" tidal swing, though it obviously gets shallower around the edges. Off the NJ coast, even a few miles out, you're only in 40-50' of water. I was astounded when I first went sailing with a friend off SoCal a few years ago and saw depth markings on the GPS of 400+ feet only a relatively short distance off the coast.
05-02-2013 02:40 PM
GeorgeB
Re: Winged keel

Out here in the West Coast we have diurnal tides that swing five feet (more if you are Canada or Washington) which compounds our anxiety while transiting shallow water. We do seek shallow water for current relief but it is a delicate balancing act. As I helmsman I need to be very aware of where we are in the tide cycle. In San Pablo Bay, I tack out pretty much immediately when I see single digits on the sounder (Sounder measures from the surface). In the Olympic Circle off Berkeley, I go in, eyes metaphorically closed only because I am usually chasing boats with deeper drafts.

I am curious on how you guys do it on the East Coast. Is the really skinny water at entrances and you guys work your way in under motor? What is your average depth while sailing? We like to find “shallow” water to anchor in (usually 15-20’). My record anchoring depth was 96’! But that was during a race when the wind shut down and we didn’t want to lose ground on the account of current. (pretty trippy, flying a spinnaker and anchored at the same time off of Alcatraz.)
05-02-2013 01:14 PM
krisscross
Re: Winged keel

Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
No, you can still get it off by heeling it, you just have to heel it more (from experience).
Bulb keel is easier to free up as it gives less resistance and has less surface area. In a lighter boat you just get your passengers into a dink and the boat floats away free
05-02-2013 01:06 PM
mr_f
Re: Winged keel

There seem to be a lot of folks saying this is only important in racing, but isn't PHRF meant to take those differences into account? So in theory, if I am racing, it should make no difference. But as I pass someone while cruising, I don't usually give myself a time penalty and declare the other folks to be faster. I just yell some insults and revel in my prowess. Definitely worth the extra draft for that.
05-02-2013 12:44 PM
Group9
Re: Winged keel

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jiminri View Post
Run aground in mud/sand and the winged keel becomes a highly effective anchor. And you can't heel the boat to work free. At least that's what I've been told. Never had one, so I'd like to know how true that is.
No, you can still get it off by heeling it, you just have to heel it more (from experience).
05-02-2013 11:00 AM
krisscross
Re: Winged keel

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimgo View Post
Perhaps a light-weight centerboard might work (much less risk of damage), but the swing keel made me a bit nervous.
I agree with you there. My swing keel is not that heavy (Mirage 5.5m) but the upwind performance is not great. Another trade-off. However, the low or neutral weight CB designs (Bristol, Tartan) I have seen really work well in shallow waters. I sail mostly on Pamlico Sound which has a lot of tricky, shallow spots that keep moving around. I run aground quite often but all I have to do is lift the keel a little and I'm back in the game.
05-02-2013 10:43 AM
jimgo
Re: Winged keel

Kriss, I had a C25 with a swing keel, and would gladly have moved to a wing. The wing was something like 3" deeper than the swing keel with the keel up. Where I sailed, those 3" would have bought me about 20-30 minutes of additional sailing time (shallow bay, could only sail high tide +-3 hours), but the peace of mind of not worrying that a 1500lb slab of steel was going to come down and break the keel trunk would have been very nice. I actually ruled out swing keels this time because of it.

Perhaps a light-weight centerboard might work (much less risk of damage), but the swing keel made me a bit nervous.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:27 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.