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Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Grampian > Chain plates
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Thread: Chain plates Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-16-2013 02:11 AM
KnottyGurl
Re: Chain plates

cut out the old peice of wood covered in glass as best and intact as possible, this will be used as a template.
then using cardboard from a box make a second template that is cut to fit what you have left from your cut.
you will have to sand/grind some wood and glass back and attempt to make as flush as possible.
when you are satisfied with card board template then transpose onto a marine grade plywood and cut new piece
put a layer of matting up on glass section and extend at least 18 inches on both sides of new board, snug board in at same time so it is fitted into place.
with another matting lay along first layer and then cover wood on each side but do not wrap over end come to an inch of end, then cut where needed to make fitting tight at hull side on both sides of the plate.
next take a tight weave cloth and in smaller sections fold into corner extending to end and 10 inches along hull 6 more layers will work and each one on hull should be 2 inches shorter.
then p-lace the last of the cloth over the whole repair to cover andhelp when you fair it out
grab a can of structure filler and fair out all
place plate and with sharpie mark holes, drill
re bolt plate and locktight with blue.
should be as good or better then new
repaint if needed and Bob's your uncle
08-13-2013 05:48 PM
davidpm
Re: Chain plates

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthlessrider View Post
OK, I don't claim to be all that knowledgable on marine terminology, so just to make sure I know what everyone is talking about, can someone define bulkhead, please? To me a bulkhead is a walled barrier between compartments, such as the barrier between the head and the V-berth. The chain plate seems to be not anchored to the bulkhead, but to one of the boats ribs (my term). So the boat would have a wooden rib helping to form the plane of the hull, sandwiched by the chain plate, covered by epoxyed fiberglass. Wrong?
Your definition of bulkhead is fine.

I can't make out what the rib is that you are talking about but it don't matter much. One way or another you have to chop out rotten stuff and replace it. Working with epoxy is well documented in the west systems site.
If you put it back together with solid wood and epoxy and do the 8 to 1 bevel it you want to do any patches it should be as strong as new.

I wouldn't do anything like this myself without at least having one book.

This is good one.

Amazon.com: Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair, Sailboat Refinishing, Sailbo (9780071462846): Don Casey: Books Amazon.com: Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair, Sailboat Refinishing, Sailbo (9780071462846): Don Casey: Books



If you don't know about this stuff you can do something that will make sense at the time but will cause the repair to fail, and you may not be so lucky the second time.
08-13-2013 01:37 PM
Ruthlessrider
Re: Chain plates

According to most of the internet information out there, they indicate that the chainplate is attached to a member of the hull superstructure.
08-13-2013 01:31 PM
Ruthlessrider
Re: Chain plates

OK, I don't claim to be all that knowledgable on marine terminology, so just to make sure I know what everyone is talking about, can someone define bulkhead, please? To me a bulkhead is a walled barrier between compartments, such as the barrier between the head and the V-berth. The chain plate seems to be not anchored to the bulkhead, but to one of the boats ribs (my term). So the boat would have a wooden rib helping to form the plane of the hull, sandwiched by the chain plate, covered by epoxyed fiberglass. Wrong?
08-13-2013 11:07 AM
jimq26
Re: Chain plates

Rather than me writing a bunch of stuff, I suggest you visit this website (index) where you will find all the details of repairing or replacing chainplate bulkheads.
08-13-2013 09:40 AM
Ruthlessrider
Re: Chain plates

davidpm,

You are right, I was very lucky.

Thank you all for you contribution, I certainly appreciate your assistance. Now to begin.
08-12-2013 07:25 PM
davidpm
Re: Chain plates

Pretty much any thing you can do to get the wood replaced and strong will work.
Sometimes replacing a whole bulkhead is the the easiest best way to go.

You can however patch plywood and have it as strong as original by cutting a piece out and tapering what is left (scarf) back 8 to 1. so for a 1/2" thick board taper it back 4 inches.
Then fit in a new piece with a matching taper and set it a bed of epoxy.
The fein multimaster or good quality clone is a good tool for close work and may even help in some places with the taper.
The taper don't have to be perfect it can even be chiseled in places. The thickened epoxy can fill and eight inch easy.

Then if you cover the plywood with a couple layers of epoxy and glass cloth it will be very strong.

All depends on exactly what you can get to and what is rotten.

Good quality plywood with a lot of layers with no internal voids is much stronger than lumber store wood too if you can find it and are willing to pay for it.

It is worth getting a book or two on the subject as their are lots of ways to do it wrong.

You are unbelievably lucky you didn't get hurt or break the rig.
08-12-2013 11:02 AM
Ruthlessrider
Re: Chain plates

Can you give me a verbal description of what you did and how you did it? Thanks. Any pictures would be appreciated.
08-12-2013 10:56 AM
jimq26
Re: Chain plates

A word of from someone who has already had this experience - you must replace the entire bulkhead, not just do some patchwork.
08-11-2013 12:14 PM
Ruthlessrider
Re: Chain plates

actually as the photos turned out, the one on the left is the view looking back toward the stern and the other is looking forward in the closet.
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