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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-03-2016 05:17 PM
WoobaGooba
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnacle billy View Post
The Scot has just short of 190 sq ft of sail area. I sailed on hull 818 and the experience was wonderful. I have three Scots for sale now, one pretty new, the others older. One person talked about the hulls getting soft with age. Maybe or maybe not. These boats are not flimsy and around here we call them Flying Sidewalks because they are so robust. For one design racing new is always best, but not necessary.
I've probably done several 100 laps around the track in a Scot. Mostly in open water.

The older boats do get soft. All things being equal, the newer boats are faster. And the wire / winch halyard system needs to go ... meat hooks, wire balls, handles to lose or break, dangerous in capsize situations.
10-07-2015 11:56 AM
rossbc
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Good advice in the posts above. I started sailing on little boats and went up to bigger boats as I got older. What you are experiencing is the difference between driving a convertible sports car and a large truck. One is nippy, maneuverable and zips around with little effort. The other appears slow and cumbersome and it takes a lot to get it going. Never be afraid to let the mainsheet go. Also, the jib - as small as that sail is, the slot between the main and the jib easily provides 50% of your drive - you can go sailing on a windy day and not even bother with the jib - that will slow things down and make life more manageable. That said, sailing a small dinghy really sharpens your skills and you will find that if and when you get back to larger boats, your are able to get them going more easily.
10-07-2015 11:46 AM
barnacle billy
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

The Scot has just short of 190 sq ft of sail area. I sailed on hull 818 and the experience was wonderful. I have three Scots for sale now, one pretty new, the others older. One person talked about the hulls getting soft with age. Maybe or maybe not. These boats are not flimsy and around here we call them Flying Sidewalks because they are so robust. For one design racing new is always best, but not necessary. There is a one design fleet in this neck of the woods and most are older vessels and so the fleet thrives nicely. I don't race in it - just am aware of it. But if you get a Scot, you don't have to race. I would assume there are hundreds if not thousands of them being enjoyed as a family day sailor. Sandy Douglass also designed the Highlander, which is a bit bigger and has a lot more sail area. That boat is tender. The Scot is not tender. I am sure you will enjoy the Scot and have lots of fond memories of it as I do as you look back through all the boats you have sailed when later down the road.
10-07-2015 09:34 AM
mf70
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Even if it doesn't have reef points (much easier to use than roller reefing for a mainsail), they can be inserted by any sailmaker for nominal cost. Reducing sail when needed (and recongnizing when that point is) are important parts of sailing.

That O'Day 22 will heel much more than the Flying Scott. My wife and I had a lot of CB experience, but we were shocked by the heeling angles of the Columbia 24 when we made the switch to a keel boat.

Ultimately, the decision is yours, of course. There's no shame in not picking the perfect boat on the first try, as Ward H pointed out.
10-07-2015 05:03 AM
zedboy
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Ok I know the thread is old and too bad about the OP but I gotta share anyhow:

This summer we were visiting my parents in DC and I had a yen to go rent a boat at Washington Sailing Marina like we used to when I was a kid. For some reason the big kids (10 & 8) weren't interested but my 6-year-old was raring to go and so we dragged Grampa along (good thing too because they won't let single-handers with kids out of the basin).

I told my kid, "this boat is called a Flying Scot because it can fly" but we started off with just enough wind to ghost along (I remember always having light light winds in DC in the summer). He liked steering, but his eyes really opened when we got out in the river and the wind picked up later in the afternoon! It kept my dad and I on our toes! Forgot how much work that long boom and 3:1 mainsheet make. Got stuck in the shallow mud, but board up and off no problem. Only embarrassment was we couldn't get back up the narrow channel to the marina because the wind had shifted and it was dead to weather (and our rudder was fouled so we weren't pointing well). The marina guys came out and towed us in.

Our last boat was a Siren 17 which weighs about the same as an FS but has 50 feet less sail area, and I found it plenty lively. I think the FS has more sail area than my old boat - which weighed around 3000 lbs (!)

Since then my kid keeps talking about how we sailed a boat that really flies and we should get one like that - except with a motor!
10-07-2015 12:05 AM
tellemark32
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Simple answer: No, you made a great choice! Perfect starter boat. Matter of fact, perfect boat for many folks forever. Youngsters, oldsters and "in-betweensters". Safe, stable, superbly designed, floats when swamped.

I started on an Uffa Fox designed O'Day Javelin. My suggestion is to stick with it. Sail in light to moderate winds at first until you understand how to use the mainsheet and body weight to keep her on her feet. My Javelin required constant play of the mainsheet in heavy breezes. It's all about anticipation. You have to keep your eyes peeled to windward to watch for the dark patches that indicate gusts.

Join the Flying Scot forums. Ask tons of questions. Try to meet sailors in or near your area and go sailing with them. Lots to learn and these folks really know their boats. Well designed and safe for all ages. Start out in lighter breezes. As you progress go out in slightly stronger breezes. When you build confidence, go out in stronger breezes. It's a progressive thing. Stick with it and I'll bet you'll love your Scot after a few months.
10-06-2015 11:00 PM
TakeFive
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by captainbill View Post
You did not buy the wrong boat. I have sailed flying Scots as well as taught sailing in them for over 17 years and have not turned one over yet. Most of those I have seen turn over were being sailed in 20 knot plus winds or with a few exceptions lesser wind with crew on the down wind side and not letting the main and jib out during gusts. Stick with the boat, get some experience and then decide in a year or two if you want to get rid of it. Expect that if your wife gets into sailing she will require a bigger boat. Keep the Scot though.
Original post was over two years ago. He did capsize it. It killed the dream for him. He put the boat up for sale.

OP has been gone for over two years. He is not going to hear any of your advice. I suggest that you not waste your time.
10-06-2015 09:38 PM
captainbill
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

You did not buy the wrong boat. I have sailed flying Scots as well as taught sailing in them for over 17 years and have not turned one over yet. Most of those I have seen turn over were being sailed in 20 knot plus winds or with a few exceptions lesser wind with crew on the down wind side and not letting the main and jib out during gusts. Stick with the boat, get some experience and then decide in a year or two if you want to get rid of it. Expect that if your wife gets into sailing she will require a bigger boat. Keep the Scot though.
10-03-2015 02:17 PM
barnacle billy
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

I raced a Flying Scot for many years - as a matter of fact, I learned how to sail on a Scot. Never tipped it over. Very stable, in my opinion for a day sailor. The brochure even exemplifies how stable it is and how hard it is to tip over. There are a lot of day sailors that are much more tender or accelerate quicker, so actually the Scot is a good boat to learn on. You just have to get the handle on dumping the mainsail in a gust and hauling the sheet back in after the gust passes and continue on your way. I should also say that for rigging, the Scot is pretty simple in comparison to other day sailors that are used for racing. Perhaps the other extreme is the Star Boat of which I have also raced. But, for day sailing with the family and not racing, the Scot is great, simple and straight forward.
09-29-2015 01:32 AM
Stumble
Re: Flying Scot - did I buy the wrong boat?

Cc53,

Did you jump in just hoping to be offended? If you actually read what I wrote instead of just taking offense I think you would see that nowhere did I call you stupid, ignorant, or whatever other thin skinned nonsense you spouted. What I actually said is...

"In todays market buying a new Scott is just a waste of money. UNLESS you plan on racing them in serious one design regattas, in which case you will be buying a new one every 5-7 years as the hulls soften. "

Since you fit the UNLESS I spelled out, I don't see what your objection is. Unless you are seriously arguing that no major changes in boat design have occurred in the last sixty years since the Scott was designed.

As for how the Vipers are holding up, a hull from the second year of production back in 1998 or so finished second at the 2014 North Americans. So at least so far 17 year old boats are still highly competitive in major regattas.
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