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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2 Hours Ago 11:46 PM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrjebt View Post
Bentonville, Arkansas and boat will be on Beaver Lake. There's a large sailboat club with roughly 100 boats on five docks.

We did buy a new rubrail from DR Marine. Haven't put it on yet but it's the best quality in my opinion.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
oh. yeah. lol. not in my neck of the woods. lol.

yeah. that's one of the two i know. if you don't mind my asking, what was the cost? just have to bite the bullet. if memory serves me, i think it's around $300. i was actually thinking it was $500 but, i think that's not right.

i know it sounds cheap but:

$300 for the boat
$200 for a really nice roller furler

it just seems that $300 is high compared to what it is/does. it's a strip of, basically, rubber channel. but, it is what it is. if someone was scrapping out an old cal and the rub rail was decent, i'd definitely go that route but, i haven't had that kind of luck....although....you never know. i did find a furler for $200. stranger things have happened.

did you have any mast support compression issues? when i drop my mast, in a month or so, i have to do a bit of repair on that. it has compressed around 3/4" to 1". nothing uncommon on a boat of this age.

was yours an outboard or inboard model? mine was designed/delivered with an inboard (vire 7) but the previous owner removed it and went with an outboard, which is what i am going to do (an outboard and a yuloh). i suppose the original motor took a crap and he said the heck with it.

i am impressed with the interior layout. the saloon feels very homey and welcoming.

needs more headroom in the v-berth, though. i wish they had made all of them flush deck, like the T2. but, i have plans on rectifying that problem; or, at least, dealing with it.


this image is a lot like my day of dinghy sailing. epic, Sir Francis Drake type stuff.
15 Hours Ago 10:40 AM
mrjebt
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Bentonville, Arkansas and boat will be on Beaver Lake. There's a large sailboat club with roughly 100 boats on five docks.

We did buy a new rubrail from DR Marine. Haven't put it on yet but it's the best quality in my opinion.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
17 Hours Ago 09:34 AM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

where, on the planet, are you located? couldn't find that on your profile.
17 Hours Ago 09:31 AM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrjebt View Post
I believe we have the exact same boat. I meant to type 1970 not 1979. We've repainted everything and are beginning the steps of putting back together. Not too much remaining. I don't have 10 posts here yet so I can't attach pictures. Hopefully that will occur rather quickly.


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lol. yeah. i figured that out right after i posted so i edited my original post. that's funny. well met, indeed! we don't actually have the exact same boat because i am pretty sure i'd have noticed if anyone else was working on my boat, at least at some point.

so, did you need to replace your rub rail? if so, where did you find it? i know of only two sources and they both cost more than i paid for my boat, the outboard motor, and all my shore power components put together...for a rubber bumper. lol. wouldn't mind finding a more economic source, if possible.
17 Hours Ago 09:20 AM
mrjebt
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

I believe we have the exact same boat. I meant to type 1970 not 1979. We've repainted everything and are beginning the steps of putting back together. Not too much remaining. I don't have 10 posts here yet so I can't attach pictures. Hopefully that will occur rather quickly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
17 Hours Ago 09:14 AM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrjebt View Post
This is over a year old but thought I'd try to bring it back to life. We have a 1979 27 poptop as well, hull #7!! Currently finishing up a refit. Rewiring today actually. Hope to have it on the lake in a month or two. Would love to keep this thread alive!


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well met! i rarely run into anyone that has a cal27, on line, although there is an older lady that has one berthed in the marina where i berth my boat, but it's a 2-27. it's a nice boat. she lives aboard. that's my goal, as well. although she no longer sails hers; which is definitely not my goal. i plan on casting off every chance i get.

looks like you are farther along in your refit than i. due to money concerns, mine has been dragging. however, things are starting to really come together and i can see the possibility of light at the end of the tunnel, now.

hold on a minute. i was just reviewing my post. you say yours is a pop top, too (hull 7). the date can't be right. i have hull number 9. no way yours is a 1979. could it be a 1970 with a typo? nine is pretty close to zero...

if yours was a 79, we'd actually have completely different boats. not sure how much you know about the 3 cal 27s but. mine (yours too?) is the first version. it came in pop top (like mine) and in a flush deck version, with a doghouse, called the T2. in 73 they came out with the 2-27, which is the second model. it was the biggest of the three 27s. that's the one you usually see. everyone has one of those. if your boat is a 1979, that's what you have (but, they certainly didn't come in a pop top version). almost no one has the first version, like me, and it's hard to find out anything about them. then, in 83, they came out with the last version. all three are completely different hulls/designs.

if you have a pop top, that's really awesome. it's a bit lonely owning one. everyone that says," yeah, i have a cal 27", has a totally different boat. lol. it's like being the black sheep in the family. do you have a pics?
18 Hours Ago 08:25 AM
mrjebt
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

This is over a year old but thought I'd try to bring it back to life. We have a 1979 27 poptop as well, hull #7!! Currently finishing up a refit. Rewiring today actually. Hope to have it on the lake in a month or two. Would love to keep this thread alive!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
06-07-2014 07:41 PM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

a short update, if anyone is interested.

one of the free sails i got from the marina is going to work great for my jib. it must be pretty new. the sail cloth still has that paper crispness. it is a lapper. hoister to the masthead, it will clear my stanchions and life lines completely. that will also give better visibility than if it was a deck sweeper.

it was totally free. but, it will end up costing me something. i want to use a furler and it's hank on. i need to find a loft that is good and would do the modifications at a reasonable, fair price. i don't think bacon is a good choice for that. i have spoken to them about modifying a jib for furling and they seem reluctant to do it; pushing me to buy a new sail instead.

anyhow, in 7 to 9 kt winds (loosely tied up to the dock) it is not hard to sheet in. my girlfriend was able to do it with one hand (without using a winch). so, i don't think it will prove unmanageable for her. i figure, in stiffer winds, a few turns around a winch should be good. she probably won't often need the winch handle.

and, yes, it was mildly exciting to see her (the boat not my girlfriend) trying to sail. if i had undone the docklines....so bloody tempting. lol

anyhow, i came on a hobie 18 sail, in great shape, for a pitance, a month ago. it has a bolt rope luff so i will be sewing on sliders. sailrite sells them. i am also going to sew on one set of reefpoints, for now. it fits within the available space, nicely. before doing the boom kicker, i am going to test sail it
with this sail, to make sure i like the way it handles. no good setting the boom kicker up for this sail and then i don't like it.

that's all the important stuff, for right now. the rest is general restoration work. nothing very exciting, unless you are the one doing it. then, every step fowards is exciting.
05-16-2014 05:54 PM
captain jack
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddin'_Tain View Post
Spruce spreaders will last 30+ years with a pretty minimal amount of maintenance. Just paint the top and sides every 5 or 10 years (varnish the bottom surface, so you can see any rot developing) and they'll be fine. If you do switch to aluminum tube, you should probably get new mast hardware that is specifically made for tubes. And use marine grade aluminum to prevent them from corroding faster than wood will rot. But, even marine grade aluminum needs to be periodically inspected and maintained. Nothing on a boat is maintenance free.

BTW, the upper shrouds should be parallel to the mast until they turn at the spreaders. So, the spreader length should be pretty damned close to the distance between the shroud and the mast near the mast base.
that's a really good point. it hadn't even occurred to me. thanks.

there is a company that makes aluminum replacement spreaders. send them your old wooden ones and they make you a pair. they bolt right up like the original wooden ones. on the cal yahoo group, someone sent me a pic of the ones they had made by that company. they basically used eliptical tubing, like what you see on certain parts of a hang glider, and welded a piece on either side. i can do the same thing for less that the $600 that they are charging, since i don't charge myself much labor.

thanks for the tip about using marine grade aluminum. i will look into that.
05-16-2014 03:14 AM
Puddin'_Tain
Re: looking for past or present owners of 1970 through 73 cal 27s

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain jack View Post
i know spruce is the most common on boats of the time. i didn't actually see them up close. the rigger did. he's the one that said they are teak. wood seems to be a somewhat high maintenance material to make them out of, to me. i am going to make my new set out of aluminum tubing. you can get hang glider tubing that has a nice cross section. then you just need to cut to length and weld ends on. of course, i won't know the dimensions til i get one of the originals in my hands. i looked on line but can't find dimensions anywhere. it's too bad. it would have been nice if i could have fabbed up the new ones in advance and just did a swap.
Spruce spreaders will last 30+ years with a pretty minimal amount of maintenance. Just paint the top and sides every 5 or 10 years (varnish the bottom surface, so you can see any rot developing) and they'll be fine. If you do switch to aluminum tube, you should probably get new mast hardware that is specifically made for tubes. And use marine grade aluminum to prevent them from corroding faster than wood will rot. But, even marine grade aluminum needs to be periodically inspected and maintained. Nothing on a boat is maintenance free.

BTW, the upper shrouds should be parallel to the mast until they turn at the spreaders. So, the spreader length should be pretty damned close to the distance between the shroud and the mast near the mast base.
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