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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > intervention councelor(s) needed...
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Thread: intervention councelor(s) needed... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-29-2013 04:40 PM
hellosailor
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Douglas, this is easy, really. I want you to go to a cigar store and buy a wooden cigar box, preferably an old used one, not a new one. Now, put it in a sauna for a couple of days. If there's no sauna around (I understand some of the poor people don't have them) just place it in your shower for a day under hot running water.

Now, take that cigar box, clean it, dry it, and bring it back to me fully varnished and shiny all around, with no damages, no loose joints, and to prove it, I want you to buy six very expensive Cuban cigars, put them IN the box, and place it back in the shower with the water running for an hour.

If the cigars are dry and the box is gleaming, you're the kind of guy who should buy a wooden boat.

If the cigars are in any way damaged...wood is not for you. Pay homage to it, wave at it, admire it, but do not even think about owning it. Enjoy some fine brandy with the new cigars you buy to replace the soggy ones, and remember that.
12-29-2013 04:03 PM
outbound
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

The outbound is my " last boat" and only one I ever bought new. It was spec'd with NO exterior wood. Builder snuck in a 2"x2" piece of wood under the bow nav light. " to appease the teak gods". It's been left bare. Epiphanies stock dropped 5 points.

Wood is fine as long as it strip plank or cold molded. Plank on frame will find you broke,divorced and unable to find a marina that will give you a slip. Still read Wooden Boat and drool.
12-29-2013 03:12 PM
floatingPoint
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
Seriously, intervention?
OK, here goes. I've sailed on and operated a great many wooden vessels over the last 50+ years and I love them, each and every one.
The oldest I've sailed on was built in 1886, the oldest I've operated professionally was built in 1906 and the oldest I've owned was built in 1909 and she brought me to a safe harbor after 5 days in a SoPac hurricane at 65 years old.
[snip]
I could go on, but perhaps this much has made that intervention successful.
Again, I love wooden boats; the feel, sea kindliness and warmth cannot be beat. But owning a wooden boat today, especially a classic, is for the very rich, and not a sailor's pastime; it's a career.
One can not ignore the voice of first hand experience. Thanks for taking the time, I'm going to have to digest this a bit.

While I can't point to one right this minute I'm sure there's a soling around which is at least as pretty as the mystery yacht I'm looking at.
12-29-2013 03:03 PM
floatingPoint
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Quote:
Originally Posted by christian.hess View Post
I owned a herreshof h28 ketch I refit and "restored" and bought in alameda california...it had rot in the stuffing box plank and that was it...it leaked bad....as soon as that was fixed I had one of the most regarded heavy duty and sweet sailing wooden boats of all time
[snip]
avoid hearsay and research the boats you are looking at intensly, Im glad to offer any insight or help if I can

cheers
This is more or less the situation I'd like to recreate for myself. An 8.5m ketch wouldn't necessarily be my thing - but as you mention old and wood does not necessarily mean disproportionately expensive or slow. Not slow if you compare it to other yachts at the same displacement.

Of course a wooden boat can be expensive. I've been around marinas and boats for many decades now and almost every boat I was in, on or around was plastic. My boats have all been plastic - I'm not down on the stuff. But those plastic boats can and do suffer many of the same issues of a wooden boat. I knew a scarab which had to have the whole stern cut off and another built up - soggy marine plywood. A Grady had to have most of the cockpit sole cut out due to balsa rot. I don't think either of the boats represent the norm and I'm not knocking power boats. I'm a certified drop the hammer and go kind of a guy.

I just have a hard time accepting that a recreational wooden boat in the 8m class is necessarily a lot more expense or trouble than the plastic boat.
12-29-2013 02:53 PM
Capt Len
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

I've noticed that owners of plastic boats often show interest in classic woodies. Hard to tell if it's awe, sympathy or ignorance. Done right, owning a wooden vessel puts you way above the herds of unimaginative conformists .On the other hand, it could leave you in the yard all May and June enjoying the learning curve.
12-29-2013 02:39 PM
Markwesti
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Hi Douglas , What kind of boat do you want ? I assume a sail boat . But what size ? How much are you willing to spend ? Are you going to be on a trailer or a slip ? I know you talked about Dana , but still I ask . One reason is that I know a guy that built one little fine sailboat (24ft.) and he keeps it on a trailer half the season . I call him Wooden Boat Bill . He helps me with wood projects, he is a craftsman/artist . He might have a wooden boat for you. If you are interested please contact me and I will PM you . Also please note I have not contacted Bill about this first , But I really like your enthusiasm . I'm sure Bill would too .
12-29-2013 02:32 PM
Seaduction
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
Douglas, I answered your "should you buy" thread about the 18ft Peterson. However.. the above that you wrote.. and I'm tryig to say this kindly, but it you need to learn allot more about boat building and construction of wood and fiberglass. The way wooden boats are built is hundreds of years old. The type of hull construction needs to be determined before we can advise you on more.

Here's a young lady doing "routine" work.
Lisa caulking hull - YouTube
I think he's just practicing "creative writing."
12-29-2013 02:06 PM
jrd22
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Our boat is fiberglass (it had teak decks that we removed) and the small amount of teak (cap rail, hand rails, trim pieces, etc) require at least three times the total amount of maintenance for all the other exterior surfaces. Just sayin.
12-29-2013 02:15 AM
christian.hess
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

I disagree...if you are patient and your love for the boat EXCEEDS common wisdom youll be fine! ajajajajajajaja

slight bad joke but seriously some great deals can be had...just pay attention to the particular issues of said boat you are seeking and that applies to all forms and material boats...

cheers

ps. while caulking is a dying art that doesnt mean you cant do it

I did in panama using wool and 5200 instead of other more traditional materials...I also used syringes and boatlife or whatever pleased me at the time...

water in the bilges is a way of life...make sure its saltwater and dont let it get too high and your fine

pay attention to garboard strakes under the mast and the keelsun and keel attachment method...most wooden boats have nice hung rudders that are easily serviceable

mine floated! jajaja
12-28-2013 11:43 PM
capta
Re: intervention councelor(s) needed...

Seriously, intervention?
OK, here goes. I've sailed on and operated a great many wooden vessels over the last 50+ years and I love them, each and every one.
The oldest I've sailed on was built in 1886, the oldest I've operated professionally was built in 1906 and the oldest I've owned was built in 1909 and she brought me to a safe harbor after 5 days in a SoPac hurricane at 65 years old.
You can't ignore things like annual haul outs on a wooden boat; there are creatures that eat the wood if the antifouling isn't working (or gets dinged by something you hit, but isn't even big enough you know you hit it), and even if the paint is fine, they can get through the seam compound and then into the wood. There are frames, ribs, ceiling, planking, floor timbers and butt blocks (just to name a few), all subject to rot, which is in many cases invisible, without dismantling the vessel from outside (removing planks). Wooden boats work and hog and they change shape if the rig is too tight or loose, sometimes causing problems that can cost many times the value of the boat, to repair.
Even a newer wooden boat can develop serious problems. Ask the crew on vessels like the Spirit of South Carolina and Virginia, just to name two.
Whatever fastening was used to attach the planking to the ribs can corrode, have electrolysis or just plain rust. You can spring a plank while sailing, opening a huge hole in your boat, but have no notice in advance that it might go. The seams need to be caulked periodically and I'm guessing it's pretty expensive to get it done these days, as it's a dying art (this I know for a fact, but that's a story for another post). If you get caught in heavy weather, a wooden boat, even a well caulked one, can spit out her caulking and begin to leak pretty seriously (another story).
I could go on, but perhaps this much has made that intervention successful.
Again, I love wooden boats; the feel, sea kindliness and warmth cannot be beat. But owning a wooden boat today, especially a classic, is for the very rich, and not a sailor's pastime; it's a career.
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