SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Tension of Standing Rigging
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Tension of Standing Rigging Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
06-19-2007 07:14 AM
tagster Heh, shows what I know.

I'll buy a tension gauge and see if I can't find a local expert to help me out with this. I don't really know anyone suitable, maybe I'll hire someone.

Determining the "usual" rig tensioning for my boat is going to be very difficult if not impossible. There aren't very many of these boats out there. Although my tensioning might need to be similar to other models by the same shipyard, but I would sort of doubt that since the other models this size have completely different rigging.
06-19-2007 12:46 AM
Valiente Yep, that's correct. Inspect the chainplates for wear, oval boltholes and cracked knees first, prior to spinning the turnbuckle to half a ton of tension.
06-18-2007 09:30 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente
Sure, if you go downwind in five knots of wind.

Otherwise, the tension of the stays is usually determined by a number of factors, primary among them the type of mast you have, the diameter of the stays and shrouds, the "rake" of the mast, and the type of sailing you do.

Most stays are too slack, i.e. the rig is not optimally tuned. This can be seen on each tack, where the lee shrouds are slack. Too much slack leads to too much mast movement, work hardening, wear and crappy sail performance: The stays are the "ligaments" of the rig, with the mast, hull and chainplates forming the "skeleton" which transfers the power of the wind in the sails to move the boat. Slack stays=poor transfer, wear and eventually failure.
Not to mention the shock loading that can occur with a loose rig... the sudden transfer of the tension and load from one side to the other can cause a catastrophic failure in a gybe, and possibly to the loss of the mast.

Quote:
Consider borrowing or buying a Loos or other type of tension gauge, and determine the usual rig tensioning for your boat. Check all chainplates FIRST, because you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is because the chainplates are half pulled apart.
I think you meant to say that "you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is not because the chainplates are half-pulled apart." A loose rig due to badly adjusted stays and shrouds is one thing, a loose rig due to failing chainplates is a different beastie altogether.
06-18-2007 07:28 PM
Valiente Sure, if you go downwind in five knots of wind.

Otherwise, the tension of the stays is usually determined by a number of factors, primary among them the type of mast you have, the diameter of the stays and shrouds, the "rake" of the mast, and the type of sailing you do.

Most stays are too slack, i.e. the rig is not optimally tuned. This can be seen on each tack, where the lee shrouds are slack. Too much slack leads to too much mast movement, work hardening, wear and crappy sail performance: The stays are the "ligaments" of the rig, with the mast, hull and chainplates forming the "skeleton" which transfers the power of the wind in the sails to move the boat. Slack stays=poor transfer, wear and eventually failure.

Consider borrowing or buying a Loos or other type of tension gauge, and determine the usual rig tensioning for your boat. Check all chainplates FIRST, because you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is because the chainplates are half pulled apart.

Ask for help. It's not an amateur job, but it's one easily learned and the results may surprise you.

Rigging Tension: Information from Answers.com
06-18-2007 06:36 PM
tagster
Tension of Standing Rigging

So preparing for my trip I've been checking up on and fixing item after item on my boat...and I've noticed that my stays are all completely different tensions.

I have a lot of them.

On the foremast:
  • Two forward stays
  • Three standing/main stays
  • Two strongbacks (high tension running back stays)

On the main mast:
  • One forward stay (rigged to the foremast)
  • Four standing/main stays (one forward one aft and one pair of two center of the mast)
  • One fully adjustable running back stay (only tightened/loosened by hand using some compound pulleys and a line clip - whatever those are called)

How tight should each stay be? I'm fairly sure they should be balanced around the boat, but how much give should they have? Should I be able to shake them with my hands?

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:24 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.