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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Aging Rigging
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Thread: Aging Rigging Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-18-2007 11:08 AM
Gramp34 If your rigging is wire rope looped over the end of the turnbuckle as shown, you can undo the rope, slack off the turnbuckle then reclip the rope at the new position. See Crosby Wire Rope Clips - Warnings and Safe Installation Instructions for instructions.

Cheers,

Tim
07-18-2007 09:17 AM
jrd22 You might check this link to Brion Toss Rigging in Pt. Townsend (SparTalk - Powered by vBulletin ) you can post your question there and get some feedback from riggers. Seems like you have figured out a good temporary solution by cutting the ends of the bolts off, but if those bolts are good you might end up having to buy new ones next year if you can find them.
07-18-2007 08:17 AM
sailingdog Tagster-

I can a problem with your rigging...and something you should correct when you replace it. The turnbuckles should have toggles at the outermost ends, where they attach to the boat. If you don't have toggles at the bottom of the shrouds and stays, the wire and turnbuckles can fatigue a lot more as they can't move in one axis.
07-18-2007 03:06 AM
tagster The cables are black coated something or other, which looks to be copper but I'm really not sure. Definitely not stainless steel, and definitely look nothing like the ones I see on any other vessels.
07-18-2007 03:04 AM
tagster My turnbuckles are of this design (particularly the left picture):



But considerably more solid. They have rather solid chromed bronze knees on either end (similar to the one on the bottom of that figure), and the two-way threaded screw in the center is 3/4" stainless.
07-13-2007 01:34 PM
hellosailor "I think it's much more likely that the rest of the boat is moving, ...the tangs on the mast are working downward."

Good thinking! That could really ruin a day.
07-13-2007 12:31 PM
Gramp34 I'd be very surprised if the rigging has stretched. I think it's much more likely that the rest of the boat is moving, for instance, the mast step getting soft, or the cabin roof is rising and pulling the topsides in, or the tangs on the mast are working downward.

Shortening the studs on the turnbuckles is a perfectly fine fix. Just make sure that the remaining engaged thread length is at least twice the thread diameter (e.g., 1" minimum engaged length on 1/2" diameter threads).

By "traditional", do you mean galvanized steel wire and turnbuckles? If so, shop around. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised on prices. For instance, look at McMaster-Carr (McMaster-Carr Supply Company. Search for "turnbuckle". They carry a lot of parts in forged galvanized steel. Stay away from hardware store products because a lot of Asian pure crap is being sold. McMaster-Carr is an industrial distributor with no minimum order, so they carry decent quality. They also carry galvanized wire rope and other fittings. Figure out what you've got now and you can probably replace it all, and for far less than you've been quoted for stainless rigging.

When you do unstep the mast, I'd make a very careful inspection and not stop until the source of these loosened shrouds is discovered and fixed.

Good luck,

Tim
07-12-2007 11:45 PM
danjarch Correct me if I'm wrong but your talking about replacing it all in a year. The galvinized turn buckles on the three tall ships I've worked on had lasted over twenty years, so I think it will be ok. If the turnbuckles at the local hardware store aren't heavy enough, try your local tractor suply house. They should deffently have something that would work. As to not streching the shrouds and stays any futher, it's a risk you have to decide for your self. Your not suposed to recut a motorcycle chain either, but I've meet more then a few who have done it to buy another couple months before they have to replace it. I've done it myself. You know your boat, do you expect this passage to be rough?
07-12-2007 11:22 PM
sailingdog If the cables are meathook free.. they may be okay to temporarily use a bit with non-swaged fittings so they can be tensioned properly.

The question HS asks is the key one to ask. If you don't replace the rigging, but jury-rig a workaround, regardless of the workaround, what is the worst possible scenario if the jury-rig fails? You could lose the mast and possibly the boat.
07-12-2007 11:14 PM
hellosailor I'm with sd on cutting the ends off and putting on new fittings, but I suppose that would ruin the "traditional" look of your rigging? So trimming down the bolts would work.

More problematic is that if the rigging has stretched out that far, it may also be unsafe. The recommendations today are to change standing rigging after 10-20 years, depending on the service and condition. Or, if you run a cloth up the wire and you find ANY meathooks--replace it. Any meathooks at all mean the cable is failing.

Sometimes you've got to make do...but how much stress will this trip put on your rigging, and what could a rigging failure cost you?
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