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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Health / Medical Insurance for Cruisers
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Thread: Health / Medical Insurance for Cruisers Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-24-2007 04:15 PM
therapy23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind_magic View Post
you are attended not by nurses but instead by little beepy things that are all tied to some central CPU somewhere etc.

The best thing about the arrogance of the medical establishment is that it's found a true voice in the show "House" lol, because that jackass is exactly what we all think doctors are like these days.
There are not enough nurses - they are too expensive.
The hope is that the beepy thing is actually connected.

Doctors are a little bitter these days too.
You would be too if your income had been reduced 3 to 10% PER YEAR over the last 10 years or so!!!!!!!!!!!!!
11-23-2007 05:45 PM
wind_magic
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
What might ask, what are you pretending TO know?[g]

The auto industry is in the process of shifting and collapsing, nothing has actually changed and come out anew yet. Cheaper players (like the Japanese, subsidized by their government) have taken large market share--but the US players have yet to make any real significant long-term changes.

Ditto the rail industry, which simply was decimated by airlines in the US, and still has never recovered much less regrouped from it. What we've got left are Amtrak passenger rail runs--which take twice as long as they did 50 years ago, and cost more than the airlines do, and Amtrak may yet be shut down and terminated as a failure by Congress and their failure to become independent and profitable.

Then there's the deregulated aviation industry, where safety is measured in "costs per death payment" rather than 'safety", and except for the government bailout after 9/11, we'd have seen United and American both driven into bankruptcy by $50-100 BILLION dollars in claims, and their route probably sold to ElAl and Air India, both of which have security policies which would have prevented 9/11 entirely.

Healthcare? Yeah, the prices are going up, the providers (what used to be called "doctors") are going broke, the subscribers are getting screwed, the executives are making huge money--and the state and federal regulators ignore it all. Watch for an NBC-TV national report by Brian Williams in another week or two, highlighting the way that Medicare abuse reports are being ignored by city, county, state, federal, FBI, Medicare, agencies at all levels. Ignored--instead of being investigated. There's some big time ineptness (or corruption) going on.

Changing the rules? Sorry, my friend, it will take a revolution, and we've all been taught in school that good little droids don't do that.
You are right on a lot of points.

When I said auto industry I simply meant that they got priced out of their own market in the 70's and have never recovered.

The railway industry was the premier industry and it collapsed under changing market demands and also it's own hubris.

And of course, hubris, I mean don't you just feel it in the air when you go to the hospital ? Didn't used to be like that. I remember when I was young and worked at a hospital people were kind, my grandmother worked there, the nurses sat with patients and talked to them, etc. Now you walk in and the equipment is better, true, but you are just a number, nobody even talks to you, you are attended not by nurses but instead by little beepy things that are all tied to some central CPU somewhere etc.

The best thing about the arrogance of the medical establishment is that it's found a true voice in the show "House" lol, because that jackass is exactly what we all think doctors are like these days.
11-23-2007 05:37 PM
hellosailor " Since that is totally unsustainable it will have to break, which means it'll get fixed. Whenever you get such massive inefficiency in a system it becomes extinct and something more efficient replaces it. It's happened in the auto industry, it happened in the railroad industry before that, it's happened in just about every industry at some point. "
What might ask, what are you pretending TO know?[g]

The auto industry is in the process of shifting and collapsing, nothing has actually changed and come out anew yet. Cheaper players (like the Japanese, subsidized by their government) have taken large market share--but the US players have yet to make any real significant long-term changes.

Ditto the rail industry, which simply was decimated by airlines in the US, and still has never recovered much less regrouped from it. What we've got left are Amtrak passenger rail runs--which take twice as long as they did 50 years ago, and cost more than the airlines do, and Amtrak may yet be shut down and terminated as a failure by Congress and their failure to become independent and profitable.

Then there's the deregulated aviation industry, where safety is measured in "costs per death payment" rather than 'safety", and except for the government bailout after 9/11, we'd have seen United and American both driven into bankruptcy by $50-100 BILLION dollars in claims, and their route probably sold to ElAl and Air India, both of which have security policies which would have prevented 9/11 entirely.

Healthcare? Yeah, the prices are going up, the providers (what used to be called "doctors") are going broke, the subscribers are getting screwed, the executives are making huge money--and the state and federal regulators ignore it all. Watch for an NBC-TV national report by Brian Williams in another week or two, highlighting the way that Medicare abuse reports are being ignored by city, county, state, federal, FBI, Medicare, agencies at all levels. Ignored--instead of being investigated. There's some big time ineptness (or corruption) going on.

Changing the rules? Sorry, my friend, it will take a revolution, and we've all been taught in school that good little droids don't do that.
11-23-2007 05:27 PM
wind_magic Thinking big picture, it's sort of a good thing that health care costs have finally started going non-linear, going up 20-30% per year, etc. Since that is totally unsustainable it will have to break, which means it'll get fixed. Whenever you get such massive inefficiency in a system it becomes extinct and something more efficient replaces it. It's happened in the auto industry, it happened in the railroad industry before that, it's happened in just about every industry at some point. At present the health care industry has priced out a full 25% of it's "customers", probably going up every year, when will it break, 35%, 40%, 50% ? At some point people just say forget it, it's not working for us, and they stop playing the game, or rather, they start changing the rules. The health care industry has become it's own worst nightmare, it couldn't do much worse than it is now. The public generally believes that the health care industry is just in it for the money, that they don't actually care about patients, that they are greedy, etc, you couldn't do worse if you hired Lucifer, Inc. as your PR company.
11-23-2007 11:14 AM
sailingdog Actually, a friend of mine who has been in the HR field for ages said that providing health benefits can often increase costs to a company by up to 65% of the employee's actual salary, and this is especially true in smaller companies with lower paid positions where the figure may be even higher. So it wouldn't surprise me that a small company can't afford it... healthcare costs have skyrocketed relative to the value of the dollar, wages or almost any other benchmark you'd compare it to.
11-23-2007 11:00 AM
wind_magic More and more "good companies" aren't providing health care. I've even heard of some small software companies that were generally making pretty good money that said that they couldn't afford health care for their employees, and that's almost unheard of.
11-23-2007 10:35 AM
labatt Suzy - That's a fairly standard thing. As a business owner, I'm used to seeing my employee's premiums increase by 20%-30% per year. We sign 12 month contracts so our rates don't increase until our contract expires. This year we only saw negligible increases in premiums for a change -only around 4%! We were quite ecstatic. By the way, even with a corporate plan, we still pay $1k/month for family coverage (HMO - $20/visit co-pay, $5/$12/$45 prescription (with unlimited coverage per year), $250 in-patient co-pay, vision coverage, dental ($2k/year I believe) and a bunch of other stuff). Individuals are around $350/month I believe. I can't remember how much double coverage is. Health insurance is expensive! We're also trying to figure out our coverage options for when we start our cruise (with our kids).
11-23-2007 09:22 AM
sailingdog LOL... aren't they supposed to wait a year before screwing you over???
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzySailor View Post
After being "enrolled" with BC/BC for one month at a cost of $432.17, we have been notified that the monthly fees for the coming year will be $563.05 A mere 30% increase. We are thinking of "unenrolling".
11-23-2007 08:47 AM
xort Suzy
Consider doing some comparison shopping here...

http://www.ehealthinsurance.com./
11-23-2007 07:26 AM
SuzySailor
Another, less encouraging update

After being "enrolled" with BC/BC for one month at a cost of $432.17, we have been notified that the monthly fees for the coming year will be $563.05 A mere 30% increase. We are thinking of "unenrolling".
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