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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2 Days Ago 12:31 PM
Yorksailor
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

There can be a significant advantage in taking US Sailing courses at a sailing club like Coconut Grove Sailing Club | A membership club on Miami's waterfront that encourages new members to use club boats and participate in club racing and regattas. It is possible to get significant low-cost experience on other club members boats. One enthusiastic lady has sailed on my boats in Florida, Bahamas, Trinidad, Grenada, Virgins and even did an English Channel crossing England to France and back. Several other club members have done off-shore passages of 5 to 25 days.

Phil
2 Days Ago 12:27 PM
pdxskipper
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Quote:
Originally Posted by newt View Post
Interesting posts all around, but I am going to say what was hinted at but not brought out concretely:
Sailing schools vary in quality. Schools tend to have good and bad instructors. One offshore school I went to had the best old captain I could ask for. Another had a young man who could not tell the shore from the ocean. Both were labeled as offshore instructors. One did outstanding, the other put his Bendy 39 on the beach not long after I was there.
Take home lesson is to research the school carefully before going, and listen to your heart. Be very careful of what they are selling. Look for transparency, and look for long term experience. One giveaway that I should of picked up is that the old captain taught military groups sailing.
I also believe that schools only get you started. They are an important place you can network quickly with other young sailors. Leave knowing you don't know a lot about sailing, but you have the experience to get out with other sailors and not be a burden.
30 years later, I still take a new guys and gals out. But I expect them to pull their weight. Often, the challenges in passage making overwhelms them. With a sailing school, at least they have an idea of what they are getting into.
The school I'm attending has been around for over 35 years, they came highly recommended and they claim to have won awards (don't ask me which or what).

But I just read the ASA's 103 knowledge list and I don't think I'm going to be learning much about binnacles, seacocks, windlass's and through-hull fittings on a 25' Merit daysailer.

I'm going to talk to the them today and will bring this up to the ASA if they insist on training with the Merit. Thanks for everyone's response!
2 Days Ago 10:44 AM
Yamsailor
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Agreed. The equipment the school uses is very important as well. A school should be teaching ASA 103 on a sail boat with inboard diesel and a steering wheel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newt View Post
Interesting posts all around, but I am going to say what was hinted at but not brought out concretely:
Sailing schools vary in quality. Schools tend to have good and bad instructors. One offshore school I went to had the best old captain I could ask for. Another had a young man who could not tell the shore from the ocean. Both were labeled as offshore instructors. One did outstanding, the other put his Bendy 39 on the beach not long after I was there.
Take home lesson is to research the school carefully before going, and listen to your heart. Be very careful of what they are selling. Look for transparency, and look for long term experience. One giveaway that I should of picked up is that the old captain taught military groups sailing.
I also believe that schools only get you started. They are an important place you can network quickly with other young sailors. Leave knowing you don't know a lot about sailing, but you have the experience to get out with other sailors and not be a burden.
30 years later, I still take a new guys and gals out. But I expect them to pull their weight. Often, the challenges in passage making overwhelms them. With a sailing school, at least they have an idea of what they are getting into.
2 Days Ago 09:25 AM
newt
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Interesting posts all around, but I am going to say what was hinted at but not brought out concretely:
Sailing schools vary in quality. Schools tend to have good and bad instructors. One offshore school I went to had the best old captain I could ask for. Another had a young man who could not tell the shore from the ocean. Both were labeled as offshore instructors. One did outstanding, the other put his Bendy 39 on the beach not long after I was there.
Take home lesson is to research the school carefully before going, and listen to your heart. Be very careful of what they are selling. Look for transparency, and look for long term experience. One giveaway that I should of picked up is that the old captain taught military groups sailing.
I also believe that schools only get you started. They are an important place you can network quickly with other young sailors. Leave knowing you don't know a lot about sailing, but you have the experience to get out with other sailors and not be a burden.
30 years later, I still take a new guys and gals out. But I expect them to pull their weight. Often, the challenges in passage making overwhelms them. With a sailing school, at least they have an idea of what they are getting into.
4 Days Ago 08:50 AM
eherlihy
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxskipper View Post
I have a question for you.

I started reading the ASA 103 textbook as I start my BCC class in a couple of weeks. The book course is based on a typical 33' cruiser, but my school will be using the same 25' Merit's with an outboard, that I sailed in my basic keel class. Even though they have 5 Catalina 27's in their club that seem more suited to the study material.

So how common is this? I know 25' is the minimum ASA standard for a BCC class, but after searching a few schools online, it seems many (or most?) use larger boats with inboard diesels or do I have the wrong impression?
The goal of ASA 101 is teaching how to make a sailboat go where you want it to go, and how to stop. This is usually taught on a 20-26 foot boat with a tiller and an outboard engine.

The goal of ASA 103 is teaching how to handle a larger boat under power. Objectives include bow in docking and anchoring. This is usually taught on a 30-35 foot boat with an inboard engine and a wheel.

If after taking this class and passing the test, you do not feel that you have achieved these objectives, you may wish to contact the school, and if necessary escalate to ASA.
4 Days Ago 02:40 AM
groggy
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxskipper View Post
I have a question for you.

I started reading the ASA 103 textbook as I start my BCC class in a couple of weeks. The book course is based on a typical 33' cruiser, but my school will be using the same 25' Merit's with an outboard, that I sailed in my basic keel class. Even though they have 5 Catalina 27's in their club that seem more suited to the study material.

So how common is this? I know 25' is the minimum ASA standard for a BCC class, but after searching a few schools online, it seems many (or most?) use larger boats with inboard diesels or do I have the wrong impression?
Yeah, I would say that is odd. The educational requirements of the class are listed here: https://asa.com/certifications/asa-1...stal-cruising/

I'm not sure a Merit 25 is going to have some of those systems that are part of the curriculum for 103.

The Bay Area club/school I took classes at taught each class on a progressively larger boats. Starting with 26' keelboats that had a tiller and outboard for BK (similar to ASA 101), progressing to 30'+ boats with wheel and inboard for BC (ASA 103), and using 40' boat for BBC (104).

A larger boat would also be a better step up should you take ASA 104 which is taught on boats 30'-40'.
4 Days Ago 10:57 PM
Yamsailor
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

I teach at an ASA school. We would find that unacceptable. The only keelboat course you teach with on a tiller and outboard engine is ASA 101.

We teach ASA 101 on the new ASA 22;

We teach 103/104/106 on a Beneteau 40

Seems like the school is ripping of their students.


QUOTE=pdxskipper;3496122]I have a question for you.

I started reading the ASA 103 textbook as I start my BCC class in a couple of weeks. The book course is based on a typical 33' cruiser, but my school will be using the same 25' Merit's with an outboard, that I sailed in my basic keel class. Even though they have 5 Catalina 27's in their club that seem more suited to the study material.

So how common is this? I know 25' is the minimum ASA standard for a BCC class, but after searching a few schools online, it seems many (or most?) use larger boats with inboard diesels or do I have the wrong impression?[/QUOTE]
4 Days Ago 08:42 PM
pdxskipper
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
I teach at both an ASA sailing and US Sailing affiliate.

Emphasis with US Sailing is performance and safety.
Emphasis with ASA is practicality (what to do when...) and safety.
I have a question for you.

I started reading the ASA 103 textbook as I start my BCC class in a couple of weeks. The book course is based on a typical 33' cruiser, but my school will be using the same 25' Merit's with an outboard, that I sailed in my basic keel class. Even though they have 5 Catalina 27's in their club that seem more suited to the study material.

So how common is this? I know 25' is the minimum ASA standard for a BCC class, but after searching a few schools online, it seems many (or most?) use larger boats with inboard diesels or do I have the wrong impression?
04-14-2016 10:47 AM
eherlihy
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

I teach at both an ASA sailing and US Sailing affiliate.

Emphasis with US Sailing is performance and safety.
Emphasis with ASA is practicality (what to do when...) and safety.
04-14-2016 10:29 AM
oneshotonekill
Re: ASA vs. US Sailing

Reviving this thread again

This is actually quite useful. I've wanted to do this almost my entire life, and I start my first sailing course in a week and a half. I'm stoked!

I guess I could just say "bump" - Lol!
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