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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction > Can a couple of inches make a big differnce?
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Thread: Can a couple of inches make a big differnce? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-14-2008 10:43 PM
sanctuarysam
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
You probably respond to the spammers who guarantee you a couple more inches too.
uh huh..and your point would be......
02-14-2008 10:17 PM
sailingdog You probably respond to the spammers who guarantee you a couple more inches too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanctuarysam View Post
roflmao..
in deference to all those here i will keep my pervy comments to myself..just for today though..
02-14-2008 10:14 PM
Stillraining
Very interesting

May be you can get a STC like in airplanes and sell your modification to other owner's....Seriosuly though I found this really fascinating that 4" would basically give you a different boat. A little harder to accomplish with my keel stepped mast...
02-14-2008 09:49 PM
sanctuarysam roflmao..
in deference to all those here i will keep my pervy comments to myself..just for today though..
02-14-2008 05:19 PM
sailingdog Yes, the four inches can make that big a difference...think about it...it isn't just four inches... since you're moving one end of a long stick four inches... the change may be much greater at the top of the mast.
02-11-2008 05:19 PM
belanich
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanctuarysam View Post


uhm..ask any woman if a couple of inches matter.
chances are they will give you that special look as to say.."uhm yeah..a couple of inches matters a lot"
oh..are we talking boats....?
Well I have noticed that with less weather helm my wife is now more willing to grab my tiller... I mean THE tiller more often.
MB
02-11-2008 05:15 PM
belanich ChucklesR,

Before the mast step was moved aft I tried all the suggestions you just outlined but could never completely correct the problem. I now see that this made learning to sail the first year more difficult. Not only was it difficult to properly trim the sails, with too much weather helm you can't feel the rudder though the tiller which makes steering diffecult.

With the mast step in the current location the mast is raked more forward - I know this only because when the mast was stepped last spring the backstay had to be let out significantly for the clevis pin to fit. Now I can feel small changes in water pressure against both sides of the rudder when I move the tiller. Now I can steer a straighter course and adjust with changing wind pressure - this is a huge advantage when learning to sail.

MB
Leapfrog
02-11-2008 04:55 PM
sanctuarysam
i'm so gonna get in trouble for this post



uhm..ask any woman if a couple of inches matter.
chances are they will give you that special look as to say.."uhm yeah..a couple of inches matters a lot"
oh..are we talking boats....?
02-11-2008 12:12 PM
Aasem If the base of the mast had slipped forward by four inches, that's likely to have induced a shitload of unwanted rake. That can induce excessive weather helm. By restepping it properly, it sounds like you solved the problem. Congrats!
02-11-2008 11:53 AM
chucklesR Shifting the base of the mast aft changed the balance by moving the center of effort aft. It also changed the relationship between your jib and main - and the slot between the sails by opening the slot up.
All other things being equal - the rest of your rig etc.. - did the move increase or decrease the rake of your mast? IMHO it may have tightened your backstay and pulled excess fullness from your main (especially if its a older main with the baggies).

Any number of factors may have changed your boats balance, certainly shifting the mast base aft would make a significant change. Designers agonize for days over calculations to get it 'right' then hope it all works once the boat is in the water.

Generally weather helm (and heeling) is corrected/reduced by

1. Reduce wind pressure on the main or increase the pressure on the head sail. This can be done by shaping (trimming) the sails and dropping the main to leeward. As the wind increases, shape/position become more critical (s/b flatter).
2. If you can, tighten the backstay. This helps to pull the fullness out of the main and will flatten the head sail. The idea is to flatten the sails and keep the draft forward.
3. Tighten the outhaul to flatten the bottom part of the main. At the same time tighten the Main and Genoa halyard to keep the draft(s) forward. Bottom batten should line up with boom, top with windex, twist at the top will allow wind to spill.
4. Move the Genoa lead aft to flatten the the lower section and twist off the leech.The luff of the main bottom batten should line up with boom, top with windex, twist at the top will allow wind to spill
5. Dropping the boom to leeward (via traveller) after shaping will reduce weather helm.
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