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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > How tight is too tight?
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Thread: How tight is too tight? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-06-2008 07:58 PM
catamount You know what comes after too tight?





Too loose.


(works with nuts and bolts as well as rigging)
05-06-2008 02:52 PM
SEMIJim
Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Jim,

The issue is that you have rig with in the titles, something with in sailnets program, makes that word along with others, automatically link to the sailnet store with in this case, rig items.
Ah hah, so that's what's happening: They broke it on-purpose. Thanks for the info.

Guess seekers of information will have to resort to search engines to find the referenced material.

Jim
05-06-2008 02:34 PM
blt2ski Jim,

The issue is that you have rig with in the titles, something with in sailnets program, makes that word along with others, automatically link to the sailnet store with in this case, rig items.

At times, a major PITA when it comes to linking things such as in your instance.

marty
05-06-2008 12:44 PM
SEMIJim For rig tuning: Read Alex' contribution: Adjusting Your Rig, step by step. and/or get yourself a copy of Ivar Dedekam's Sail and Rig Tuning. (I recommend doing both.)

I went round and round about the Loos gauge thing. Get one if it makes you happy. I might, some day, when I've money to burn. (Ha!) However Dedekam will show you a quick, easy and inexpensive way to measure wire tension as a percentage of breaking strength.

*sigh* Something must be b0rk3d with Sailnet's software's parsing code. Both of the links I tried to provide are all busted up. Good luck.

Jim
05-06-2008 12:23 PM
beej67
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieCobra View Post
bee67, that would make me nervous. Of course, I have a tendency to sail when many won't. I suppose it'd be cool for fair weather stuff.
Made me nervous at first too, but now I just pay a lot of attention to my rig, and don't sail my boat in crazy weather, which is probably more healthy for the boat over the long term even than replacing the 4th lower. It's a little harder to tune, sure, but all boats have quirks, and part of boat owning is knowing the quirks as much as it is getting rid of them. IMO anyway.

It's not a noticeably different gage, like a 16th off or something. I didn't ever notice until I was trying to measure it with a tension gauge.
05-06-2008 11:28 AM
Watermelon If you're really concerned about keeping in spec, you could get a Loos tension gauge or something of the same sort. For my particular boat, the stays and shrouds should have roughly 3-4 inches deflection when under bare poles. Generally, tight, but not too tight. I'm not sure what the numbers would be for the Pearson you have.
05-06-2008 11:22 AM
Stillraining I cant find the origional Video...The narrative has been overdubbed with music on this one and the fillming is not as good...If you turn it up lode you can hear some of the origional narrative under the music....

To much back stay pressure and probably a flaw in the hull or design...although the latter seems unlikely with the money , and quality control theses boats get..Didnt take long did it!!!!

YouTube - America's Cup - boat sinks and breaks
05-06-2008 11:09 AM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightgry View Post
Guess I missed the boat in wording my question. What I meant to ask was can you split a hull by too much tension? Can you tension a line with the buckles more than a full sail will? In the past I was worried that maybe the rig might come down if there was too much stress on the lines, but never that the hull could split. On my boat the chainplates are considerably smaller than what the hull joint is and should give first in a contest. The Tartan chainplates must be the strongest point in the whole boat.
I am not an engineer, but when I heard the company response that the rigging was too tight I had questions. Is it actually possible to pull the hull joint apart without the rigging or chainplates themselves failing first, or is the hull joint that weak in a normal boat.
It is conceivable to do all kinds of dammage to a boat depending on configuration with to much tension....Remember this is cable pulling fiberglass...It is there for a pourpus to hold the mast straight against opposing forces....any more needed to do the job is overkill...Racers push thease limits for sail shape and performance...we need not...
05-06-2008 10:55 AM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by erps View Post
Scott,
Is that slack, like just barely starting to wiggle. I sailed on one guy's boat and his leeward shrouds flopped around considerably. On my previous two boats, I would back off on leeward until they flopped and then took up the slack so they just stopped then made sure the stick was straight. I haven't messed with this boat yet.
Ray...Yes ...not floppy slack but you should be able to easy tell the differance by pulling on the shrouds form windward to leeward that they are slacker...if not the Windward shrouds not only have to battle the pressures of the winds forces but also undo strain imparted by the leeward shrouds....So not sloppy loose but noticeably looser than at the dock that you pretensioned by your loos gauge...Your way sound good...

This does require several tacks to get right and should be rechecked a time or two if recently stepped or new standing rigging has been installed..
05-06-2008 10:38 AM
CharlieCobra bee67, that would make me nervous. Of course, I have a tendency to sail when many won't. I suppose it'd be cool for fair weather stuff.
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