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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Hank on Sails w/ Roller Furling
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Thread: Hank on Sails w/ Roller Furling Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-06-2008 10:20 PM
mikehoyt A #3 and a #1 is a prudent set of headsails. If it is expected to be windy why would you go out with a #1 on your furler? Chnage down to #3 before you go out and maybe even put it on for months of Sept and Oct.

A #3 does not take up much room and having one aboard makes sense. The boat will handle better, be flatter and be safer. A half olled headsail just does not offer the same comfort or performance.

I think EVERY cruising boat should know how to change headsails on the fly and be practiced at it. If you are under crewed then a prudent boat would have on the #3 anyway and still have a storm jib below if going out for any cruise, etc...

... and the answer is YES - it is far easier to take down a #3 to switch to a storm sail than it would be to take down a #1 to do the same.

Mike
10-06-2008 07:34 PM
xort
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLAsailing View Post
Ideally, you'll have a changing line and you can attach that to the sail that's being hoisted. Alternatively, you can use the lazy sheet of the hoisted sail and, when the first sail is down, remove the other sheet and attach that as the new sail's lazy sheet.
How do you run that sheet? Extra winches? I only have one outside the cockpit on each side for the jibsheet. All I can envision is having to run the new sheet through the same lead and onto the same winch. I suspect I'm missing something.
10-06-2008 05:20 PM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikehoyt View Post
If you are down to a triple reefed main and still have a 150 on your furler half rolled or not then you have made some bad decisions.

When it is obvious there is bad weather closing in haul the genoa down and then put up a smaller headsail. It can be furling or not.
How much smaller? A storm jib? If not, at what point do you take the smaller sail down for the storm jib? And is it any easier the second time to change sails? Or do you enjoy sailing in 30 knots with a storm jib up? Sorry for all the questions but the reason I have a furler is to be able to regulate the size of the sail relative to the wind. Sail changes were never a part of that strategy for me. I guess we're all different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikehoyt View Post
Twin foils are useful when changing sails because you can hoist one inside the other and then haul down the second sail. Is a common technique in racing and the twin foil simply equips a boat that way in the event it ever decides to do a sail change in this manner.
Yep, if I was racing I'd agree with that completely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikehoyt View Post
Our boat has a roller furl dacron #1 as well as a full inventory of racing sails. It has two genoa halyards and twin foil.
You either have a whole lot of storage for sails or you're not into cruising. I wouldn't waste my storage space on a wardrobe of racing sails. Then again, different strokes . . .
10-06-2008 11:23 AM
NOLAsailing
Quote:
Originally Posted by xort View Post
When hoisting the smaller sail on the second foil with the genoa already up, how do you rig your sheets?
Ideally, you'll have a changing line and you can attach that to the sail that's being hoisted. Alternatively, you can use the lazy sheet of the hoisted sail and, when the first sail is down, remove the other sheet and attach that as the new sail's lazy sheet.
10-06-2008 11:00 AM
xort When hoisting the smaller sail on the second foil with the genoa already up, how do you rig your sheets?
10-06-2008 10:33 AM
mikehoyt If you are down to a triple reefed main and still have a 150 on your furler half rolled or not then you have made some bad decisions.

When it is obvious there is bad weather closing in haul he genoa down and then put up a smaller headsail. It can be furling or not.

Twin foils are useful when changing sails because you can hoist one inside the other and then haul down the second sail. Is a common technique in racing and the twin foil simply equips a boat that way in the event it ever decides to do a sail change in this manner.

Our boat has a roller furl dacron #1 as well as a full inventory of racing sails. It has two genoa halyards and twin foil.

Mike
10-06-2008 12:44 AM
Valiente I have a yankee cut jib on a Profurl, and a hanked-on staysail, and an assy. spinnaker I rig to a tack downhaul off the bowsprit.

I am going to get a lighter, larger genoa for the furler (because I need a light air alternative and the assy. isn't always the best choice), and the hanked-on staysail will be replaced with something bigger, but with reef points.

I like the furling foresail, but I am quite conscious of losing some pointing ability not only with it, but with the cutter rig in general. I like the cutter rig for its flexibility and options in a blow (I've run under staysail alone, and it was quite interesting to see something the size of a 33 footer's No. 3 driving 15 tons at seven knots...).

But everything has its price, and mine means more tacks to get to a point in the eye of the wind.
10-05-2008 06:47 PM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLAsailing View Post
Almost all foils have two grooves. This is more likely for sail changes than double headsails, I would guess.
Sail changes on a cruising boat don't need two grooves. Take one down, put the other up. Yes you can hoist before dropping but why would you? It's not as if you're against the clock. The most rushed choices you will make cruising is "Should we tack? Nah, let's tack tomorrow"

No, I reckon the second groove is more about twin headsails than sail changes. If you're seriously racing and need to do sail changes, you're probably using a racing foil and not a furler anyway.

There are some sailors who have two identical sails cut that are on the furler together, using both tracks. When sailing on the wind, one lies inside the other. When running downwind, gull them. When furling, furl them together. Sounds like a decent choice.
10-05-2008 06:47 PM
Stillraining Andre..I agree...I will be rigging just like you describe... no way would I have wanted my furling drums line to part yesterday or voluntarily unfurled it to yank it down..mine also has two luff grooves also but I just figured it was for as mentioned above twin Genoas running wing on wing or an extra one incase one groove got messed up somehow.
10-05-2008 06:33 PM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLAsailing View Post
Have a local sailmaker remove the hanks and sew on a luff tape. The luff tape fits in the groove on the furling unit's foil and is hoisted that way.
The problem that I have with this is that by the time you decide or know that you need to hoist storm sails, you probably already have three reefs in the main and 50% of the genoa furled away.

In order to hoist the storm jib on the furler, you first have to take the genoa down which means you have to completely unfurl it into a blasting wind, in a non-too-friendly sea, fold it or at best, open the forehatch with seawater swirling (read breaking) over the deck to stuff the sail down below . . . . you get the picture?

Not for me thanks - I'll go with the inner forestay. The main advantage of this is that you can have the storm sail on deck in a launching bag, hanked on, sheets connected, ready to deploy at any time. Dump the main, furl away the genoa, hoist the storm jib and in 60 seconds you're ready for anything.
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