SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Oil Change experience - Lessons Learned
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Oil Change experience - Lessons Learned Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
04-16-2010 09:55 AM
WanderingStar I changed my oil the other day. There is a large drip pan under my engine. I just drained the oil into the pan, then pumped it out with a brass oil pump. They draw well without that little skinny tube. I store the now messy pump in an auto oil pan in the back of the engine compartment.
04-15-2010 04:49 PM
jerryrlitton Sailhog has an excellent idea. If I may add you can invest in some good (not Russian POS) NVG's so at night you can recon again (what you looked at in the day) places to dump your oil. Maybe the boat that has a noisy dog or loud kids.....
04-15-2010 02:10 PM
svHyLyte An alternative to the hand pumped vacuum collector is a 5-gallon plastic paint pail with two plastic fittings in the lid, one sized for a hose to match the dip-stick tube or if one has a built-in sump pump as does our Perkins 4-108, the nozzel on the pump and the second sized for the hose from a small shop vac. Ideally, the fitting connected to the engine should have a spout on the inside of the lid of the pail that extends a foot or so into the pail but I'm not certain that's entirely necessary. With this arrangement, one can warm the engine for a moment or two, insert the drain hose in the dip-stick tube or connect it up to the sump-pump nozzel and in two minutes or less suction out the used oil which is nicely confined to the 5-gallon pail. In our case, once the pick-up doesn't seem to be pulling any more oil, I usually open the drain plug on the front bottom of the pan and insert the intak nozzel there, moving it around by hand, which seems to pull another 1/2 quart or so, and any sludge, from the very bottom of the pan.

The paint pail cost me $5.00+/- from a local painting supply shop:



The fittings were off-the-shelf PVC fittings from Home Depot.

FWIW...
04-15-2010 11:40 AM
sailingfool FWIW, sounds like the OP was using a Fram filter, probably not a good idea in a marine diesel unless the manual specifies such a filter, which I would doubt. You should only use filters listed in the manual, which of course are often those sold by the manufacturer at exorbitant prices. The automotive filter may fit, but they are not equivalent components. (I wonder what the warrantee says on this issue...)
04-15-2010 11:22 AM
Dumah I own a Mermaid Mariner (6 cyl, 135 HP) and it came complete with a "sump pump". I have modified to add an electric pump witch allows me to not only change the oil with 12 volts, but also gives me a "prelube" before starting. This is accomplished by connecting an old furnace burner pump to a 12 volt blower motor and adding a "t" and two ball valves to the discharge side. One side of the "t" goes into the oil gallery, while the other line is for oil change purpose only.
02-22-2010 06:32 PM
redhead78
re oil change

I also found if to take a large ziplock bag around the filter, you will catch most of the oil, a white 2x2 absorbent in the bilge is also a must. To remove Oil you can get a pump system from Beta Marine, I will try to put up a picture.....Red
02-22-2010 10:55 AM
TQA When changing the oil filter I tape a large heavy duty garbage bag to the side of the engine around the filter.

Then when working inside the bag spills are contained.

I also use latex gloves and change them when dirty. $4 per 100 on offer from Harbour Freight!

Ex mechanic
02-21-2010 02:44 PM
Livia
Quote:
Originally Posted by brak View Post
To that end, the plastic hand pump sold at West Marine and few other choice retailers can only be qualified as total crap. In fact, until I bought a decent brass pump I was of the same opinion as you.
Ditto - our brass hand pump doesn't leak a drop and our plastic one was a mess.
02-21-2010 02:22 PM
sailhog The only thing I have to add to the above is to be sure no one is present at your marina when you are disposing of the oil. The oil tends to float on top of the water, forming a huge slick. The hull of your boat can become fouled, so it's always best to go to the end the dock and dump it out next to someone elses boat. This way your hull will protected and it will look like they are the ones dumping oil instead of you. I should also add that oil is flamable, even when it's floating on water in a marina. If it catches on fire, the boats in the marina could burn. While this normally isn't that big a deal, the fire could spread to your boat if, say, the slick happens to drift in your direction. So be careful, always make sure no one is around, and take the utmost care when dumping oil overboard at your marina.
02-21-2010 01:54 PM
hellosailor Sabreman-
In theory, pulling the drain plug (on your car) is a better way to change oil, as any sludge or grunge in the oil will be on the very bottom of the pan and will come out when you pull the drain plug. A vacuum hose will never get that "syrup" off the pan bottom the same way.
On my car, the road pan doesn't cover the oil pan, that would also interfer with cooling it. Perhaps a neat 2" hole in your road pan would help?
But you're never going to regret the Moeller on the boat!
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:56 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.