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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Permanent Dock Lines, Tie Up Procecures, & Electrolysis
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Thread: Permanent Dock Lines, Tie Up Procecures, & Electrolysis Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-17-2009 08:28 AM
PalmettoSailor My slip is perfectly sized for my 36' boat and we dock head in, so we have a waterview from the cockpit, and folks on the dock don't have a view of my saloon. We use 2 lines crossed at the bow, 2 lines crossed at the stern and a single set of springlines on the starboard side, since the finger pier is on the port side and springs there would be a tripping hazard. For heavy weather prep, I add additional sets of lines bow and stern and put springlines on the port side, strip sails and canvas and put out our spare fenders and fenderboards.

Our previous boat was a 32 in a slip sized for a 40+ foot boat. Docking there was a pain, since you had to retreive the stern lines and aft springline from the aft pilings as you entered the slip and pay them out as you moved forward to position the boat where you wanted to secure it. Once in the slip, it was secured in a similar fashion to our current boat with 10' of line between the stern and the piling. On the plus side, I could dock my dingy behind my boat and not have anything in the fairway. lol

I don't tie off to a winch, but I have read that if you do, you should tie off is such a way that the load is not applied to the winch pawls. I took it to mean it was ok to put a loop over the winch and secure the other end, but not to put a loop around a piling and wrap the line on the winch as you would when it was in use. I can't say if it really will prevent damage to the winch but it sounds reasonable.
04-17-2009 07:58 AM
sailingdog Because I've see line can pt the strain on them. This is generally more the case with coaming mounted winches than with cabintop mounted ones... but still. I'd rather spend the money on buying and installing an amidships cleat than repairing the cabintop. Also, the chances that the docklines lead fair to the winch are less than good.

BTW, stanchion mounted cleats are only good for fender lines or flag halyards, since the stanchion isn't going to resist much force before it tears out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by backcreeksailor View Post
Nobody really touched on this, but is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't use my primary winches in place of using amidships cleats for springlines? (I know someone that does this on a 34' J105 just down the creek from me that has no amidships cleats either and it seemed to work ok for his boat).

BTW... The PO did leave a couple Schaefer nylon rail-mounted cleats attached to stanchions. But I don't think I'd want an 8000 lb displacement boat pulling on one of my stanchions or my railing via one of those things. So I think I'll just keep those for fender hangers.
04-17-2009 02:48 AM
chef2sail We use 8. We have midship cleats on our jib tracks which can be adjusted for transiet slips for the spring lines.

When comming into the slip especially single handed the stern spring line on the midship cleat is usally my first tie as that prevents the boat from hitting the dockbox with its bow and going to far forward into the slip. We have sewn with opposing thread color on all of our lines where they usually should be cleated as we leave our dock lines when we leave. Do this after you are happy with all your adjustments for tide over a period of time.

Our 35 ft in a 54X18 slip gives us a lot of room to play with, but also makes it harder to grab all the lines. You will find that wind direction when coming in will determine which lines to grab first ( port or starboard). We also pull in bow first for many reasons. One is privacy, two is our finger comes back almost 40 feet back making it easy to load or get on or off the boat, and third is there is less area turning needed when backing out of the slip as opposed to backing into it.

Dave
04-17-2009 01:18 AM
CapnRon47
dock lines

Backcreek,
I have read that if you use the winches you should make sure that the lines enter the winches at the same angle they are normally used (within reason). They are designed and mounted to handle forces in that plane and direction.

I also have only fore and aft cleats, I have a 35' sailboat at a 40' dock with 3 inside and outside pillings. I use 8 lines. I run criscrossed bow and stern lines from the outer pillings. I started with 1/2" lines, but they looked funny (too thin), so I replaced all my lines with 5/8" (3/4 was too big to put two lines on each cleat). I use chaffing protection on the bow and stern lines, but not on spring as they mostly hang off the boat. I run my aft going spring lines to the forward pillings. These are the longest lines and have the most stretch, so the boat can move further into the dock area. For me that is not an issue as I have a swing keel and with it up I only draw less than 2'. I run my fwd spring lines from the mid pillings to the bow cleats. This gives me extra line there and when I leave I set the ends of these lines on the forward pillings. Then when I back in I can pick up these lines and walk the boat back into the slip. Also, the aft going spring lines lay on top of these spring lines (which are shorter) and keeps them out of the water when slack.

I am also new to this as this is my first boat and first year with it, so I don't have a lot of experience, but the boat has sat well for the last 6 months. The lines are set so that the boat can come to within about 8" of the dock or the pillings, but never touch them. I add an extra line from a midships eye on a slider track to a center pilling. I use this to pull and tie the boat closer to the dock for getting on and off.

04-16-2009 11:54 PM
MJBrown I used the sheet winches for spring lines on my first boat a 23'er. Never had any issues with it.
Mike
04-16-2009 11:44 PM
backcreeksailor Nobody really touched on this, but is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't use my primary winches in place of using amidships cleats for springlines? (I know someone that does this on a 34' J105 just down the creek from me that has no amidships cleats either and it seemed to work ok for his boat).

BTW... The PO did leave a couple Schaefer nylon rail-mounted cleats attached to stanchions. But I don't think I'd want an 8000 lb displacement boat pulling on one of my stanchions or my railing via one of those things. So I think I'll just keep those for fender hangers.
04-16-2009 07:13 PM
pdqaltair
Yes, I have used mooring lines for dock lines more than once!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joesaila View Post
I appreciate having the longer lines for traveling. We visited Rockport last year and nearly had to overnight at the main dock. The tide was out and we must have been around 10 feet below. We ultimately chose a nearby anchorage but I was hustling for a bit looking for long lines. So I've got them now.
It is inconvenient, but you probably have 2-3 150-300 foot lines there when you need them... unless you use all chain, then you have 1 less.

My first cat I used 4 lines, no springs and it was fine. My new cat I use 4 lines and 2 springs (outers, but not inners). Experiment. It all depends on weight, surge, and protection from wind and wave.
04-16-2009 07:03 PM
Joesaila
Good Advice!

I appreciate having the longer lines for traveling. We visited Rockport last year and nearly had to overnight at the main dock. The tide was out and we must have been around 10 feet below. We ultimately chose a nearby anchorage but I was hustling for a bit looking for long lines. So I've got them now.
04-16-2009 07:02 PM
sailingdog One thing that really helps is having an amidships cleat. Mine is a Schaefer rail-mounted cleat... and it is very useful.
04-16-2009 06:54 PM
CaptainForce We move around a lot fulltime cruising and we do best adapting to any situation with eight dock lines on my 41' boat. Four the length of the boat and four half the boat length. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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