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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Do I need to buy offshore foulies for this south-bound delivery?
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Thread: Do I need to buy offshore foulies for this south-bound delivery? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-09-2009 01:39 PM
Valiente Thanks, guys. I'm going to weigh my options and watch the weather.
10-09-2009 12:59 PM
jephotog
Good deal on foulies

This post got me to thinking about the state of my 20 year old Foul weather jacket and convinced me to consider new ones next season. In my search I found a good deals on Gill closeouts from last season but most everything was sold out. But persistence paid off and found a jacket at 1/2 off. Just passing this along to anyone in search or maybe heading South in November.

Gill Atlantic
10-05-2009 10:15 PM
nereussailor Two years ago, I left Belhaven, NC, with Davit and his brother, the first week of November. We headed south to St Augustine, FL and ended up getting into St Augustine two days before Thanksgiving. The days were cold (60's), and the nights were even colder (30's). The first day that it was decent enough to wear shorts and a tee shirt was the day we got into St Augustine.
I have a set of foul weather gear that's kind of like yours. I had a tee shirt, sweatshirt, polar fleece jacket, and a mid range rain jacket from West Marine stocking cap, and gloves. My rain pants were from REI, and under them, I wore poly propylene long underwear and sweat pants I was comfortable the whole trip, but could have bad a little more coverage for my hands and feet.
Once you get past Cape Canaveral, The weather should be warm enough to get into something a little lighter.
It could be warmer this year though. Have a great trip.

Dave
10-05-2009 07:39 PM
OldColumbia Dear Val,

As a former Hoser, (eh!) I would recommend the lighter, more flexible rain gear since you'll be layered, wearing a PFD with harness and GPS/Radio/strobe as well as your full fingered gloves. Depending on the angle of heel, the bib (though extra padding) may give you a grand wedgie when you bend in the shoulder straps but provide some protection from green water in your boots.
Staying behind the dodger with your hood tied will keep you the warmest.
10-05-2009 03:48 PM
sahara For serious offshore, you want to stay warm and dry. For hands, forget the Gill and WM "cold weather sailing gloves". If it gets really wet, you'll be wringing water out of them 10 miinutes into a watch. For one trip, it's also not worth buying heavy duty goretex boots. Go to your local REI and get Seal Skin gloves and socks. They are waterPROOF, and work. I use them at night in Maine much more than my $300 DuBarry's. Size the socks so you can put another pair of socks beneath, and they'll be OK with a pair of Keens. Rubber boots are cheap and OK, but your feet will sweat. The Seal Skins really work.

Climbing/skiing/Biking shell layers are NOT the same as offshore FWG. I know. I thought I was going to freeze to death in Maine in July in my Arc'teryx ice climbing shell gear. If there is any way to swing it, at least get an offshore jacket with a high fleece-lined collar, wrist seals and hood. I love my Musto, but it is pricy as the dickens. My son has had very good luck with a much less expensive Gill. I think layering under a goretex bib or pants that are meant for skiing would be sufficient.

If you are going offshore, be sure the host has an extra inflatable PFD/harness and tether, or get your own.
10-05-2009 03:04 PM
tommays And remember we froze are BUTTS off in august off the south shore of Long island

10-05-2009 02:03 PM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
.

But then again if you are cycling in December in Canada in a Kilt, you may be of heartier stock than me. Might I suggest a heavy wool kilt for the passage and a sport kilt for the time on the island.
LMRO.. .Classic truly classic..
10-05-2009 01:52 PM
jephotog I raced across the Gulf of Mexico in the middle of the summer. I was glad for every piece of equipment I had with me.

Sea boots
West Marine's best bibs
Heavy Offshore Jacket (borrowed from the boat owner as mine was just worn out)
Tons of layers to go underneath it all

For the two days that it blew and the 0230 reefing wake up calls I appreciated every piece of equipment I had on. I would not go off shore without a full layer of protection.

Not that even the best equipment will keep you dry, but will lessen the quantity of water from each wave over the bow that will make it all the way down to your skin. This allows the water already inside to at least warm up a bit. There could be days of brutal weather and foulies would allow you to spend more time in the cockpit and be more alert as a result of comfort.

But then again if you are cycling in December in Canada in a Kilt, you may be of heartier stock than me. Might I suggest a heavy wool kilt for the passage and a sport kilt for the time on the island.
10-05-2009 01:36 PM
zz4gta Bring foulies. I only have one pair, but its henry lloyd's ocean racer jacket and bibs. Retail they cost a mortgage payment. But I have NEVER turned down a sail due to weather. And if I was going offshore in Nov., you'd better believe I'd have em on board.

I'm with negrini, pick a different time of year, or risk 40 knots of breeze.
10-05-2009 01:17 PM
Stillraining Buy em Val.....you will there after always have them needed or not.

Good luck to you...and have a safe trip..looking forward to the updates.
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