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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Ferry Gliding
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Thread: Ferry Gliding Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-04-2010 10:42 AM
JohnRPollard Not while docking, but we've used a similar technique to hold position while waiting for bridge openings.
01-02-2010 10:02 PM
St Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boasun View Post
Well I've never heard of it being called "ferry gliding."
But then I have always crabbed a vessel sideways using the current to my advantage.
Me too, I've heard of 'para vaning' which may be an aero term. I last used it to tie up along a ship to refuel (near Cape York). The ship paravaned to turn around in a channel its own length. It was a great bit of seamanship and I photographed it.

I still maintain its easy without eddies or breeze - unfortunately, always have a bit of both and 17+tonnes.
Happy NY guys
01-02-2010 10:01 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H View Post
I will admit, but a bit of embarrassment, that I think this was called "fairy gliding" until I read this post...
Yes will the bar in that case is not a sand bar.
01-02-2010 09:42 PM
Boasun Well I've never heard of it being called "ferry gliding."
But then I have always crabbed a vessel sideways using the current to my advantage.
01-02-2010 05:07 PM
sarafinadh worked great with the almost flat bottomed chris craft of my youth, but not so easy with a keel boat... I don't know why and haven't the energy to figure out the geometry in my head... but somehow a keel seems to make it more difficult...
01-01-2010 10:39 PM
deniseO30 I've a fair amount of doing the "ferry" when on canoes trips. I can honestly say I've used the current in the river here (tidal Delaware riv) to easily move my O30 across the river. under sail or power it works well. I don't know about in tight quarters however although I've used it a few times to pull into finger slips by turn the boat 90* port or starboard and with a slight turn to the current the boat would ease very slowly in and against the finger slip.
01-01-2010 07:15 PM
CaptainForce
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H View Post

I will admit, but a bit of embarrassment, that I think this was called "fairy gliding" until I read this post...
Fairy gliding sounds more exotic,- I'd keep it! The gliding part is new to me. I always heard the tactic as ferrying.
01-01-2010 03:12 PM
captbillc you can also use the wind to go sideways while holding position with the engine.
01-01-2010 02:43 PM
imagine2frolic Because I have a limited view of the strbrd bow, and practically zero of the port. I find it easiest to back into nearly every situation. I can keep a straigh track foir as long as I wish when backing up. The funny thing is that when I first bought the boat, the size had me a wee bit intimidated. Immediatley I realized how easy she was to handle in all situations.........i2f
01-01-2010 02:01 PM
Jim H I've done it, but only with the current nose on. In the courses I had, we were also shown to use a transit to help pull sideways onto a pontoon (dock). For example, line up a post on the dock with a tree on the shore behind, and keep them in alignment as you slide the boat sideways across the current. That will help you use the throttle to keep the boat perfectly parallel to where you want to go.

I will admit, but a bit of embarrassment, that I think this was called "fairy gliding" until I read this post...
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