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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Question about Islander 36 Ribbing
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Thread: Question about Islander 36 Ribbing Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-19-2011 05:49 PM
kahuna92630
bilge repairs

Repairs to the bilge/keel fastners area are not difficult. clean the area well, and build bridges from fiberglass. bridges must be heavy enough to stand the strain, and support the cabin sole.
Ken Smith, Ex President Of Islander Yachts, and founder of the Islander 36.
They may also be constructed from plywood, coated in resin, and bonded to the hull.
04-26-2010 09:40 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by pos3idon View Post
As I was looking this vessel over the keel bolts/bilge issues were the only thing that struck me as anything more than cosmetic. There was some minor blistering on the hull above the water line (five or ten bumps the size of a pea).

A rebuilt engine was installed in 2008 with less than 50 hours on it. New sails in the last 5 years. The insurance survey from 2008 lists the topside, deck, hull, as "good for age" and the bilge is listed as "clean and dry". Under the recommendations the surveyor listed: "The fiberglass tabbing has broken free in several areas where the interior plywood structures are attached to the hull. It is recommended to clean both surfaces and re-attach the fiberglass. This condition has not caused a structural weakness at this time." I'm not sure if this is the bilge condition the surveyor is referring to or not....
A lot can change in two years... and this bilge is pretty clearly not clean and dry. Also, the "fiberglass tabbing" is probably talking about the bulkheads and furnishings inside the cabin no longer being properly attached to the hull and deck.

Quote:
The vessel started with an asking price of 29,000 and then dropped from there. I have a very limited budget for getting a boat ($20,000) and I guess what I'm really trying to decide is if this boat is worth making an offer on (I was thinking of offering 6K since they need the boat sold before spring launch at the end of next month) and then dropping 10-14 thousand dollars into it. The owner also informed me that the deck hardware needs re bedding. Any thoughts on the matter?
I'd point out that you can probably get this same boat in fairly decent shape for the same $20,000, and that spending just a bit more money on the front end can save you a lot of money on the back end.

Also, if the deck hardware needs re-bedding, there's a very high chance that the deck may have issues as well as the bulkheads and such. The bulkheads are plywood and if the deck has been leaking for any period of time, they may be rotted.

Quote:
EDIT: also I forgot to mention that there was this much water in the bilge while the boat was in the yard on stands, although it was after a hard rain, is this normal (I'm thinking it's not)?
If it leaks this much on the hard, I don't really want to think how much it will leak in the water.
04-26-2010 07:59 PM
pos3idon As I was looking this vessel over the keel bolts/bilge issues were the only thing that struck me as anything more than cosmetic. There was some minor blistering on the hull above the water line (five or ten bumps the size of a pea).

A rebuilt engine was installed in 2008 with less than 50 hours on it. New sails in the last 5 years. The insurance survey from 2008 lists the topside, deck, hull, as "good for age" and the bilge is listed as "clean and dry". Under the recommendations the surveyor listed: "The fiberglass tabbing has broken free in several areas where the interior plywood structures are attached to the hull. It is recommended to clean both surfaces and re-attach the fiberglass. This condition has not caused a structural weakness at this time." I'm not sure if this is the bilge condition the surveyor is referring to or not....

The vessel started with an asking price of 29,000 and then dropped from there. I have a very limited budget for getting a boat ($20,000) and I guess what I'm really trying to decide is if this boat is worth making an offer on (I was thinking of offering 6K since they need the boat sold before spring launch at the end of next month) and then dropping 10-14 thousand dollars into it. The owner also informed me that the deck hardware needs re bedding. Any thoughts on the matter?

EDIT: also I forgot to mention that there was this much water in the bilge while the boat was in the yard on stands, although it was after a hard rain, is this normal (I'm thinking it's not)?
04-26-2010 07:25 PM
kwaltersmi If one picture is all we can judge by, then I'd probably take a pass on this one. In addition to floor issues, those keel bolts look mighty rusted. Islander 36's in decent shape typically go for something in the $30k+ range, so the price of this one might be another good indication of it's condition.
04-26-2010 01:47 PM
messer999 Ditto what SD & Paul said. Plus, on examination of the floor on the right, it too appears to have been "repaired" as I see several screws in about the same position as the floor on the left.

If you are going to fix a problem, fix it, don't fudge it like this PO did.
04-26-2010 01:07 PM
bellefonte Welcome to Sailnet Paul, PE. Cool website.
04-26-2010 12:35 PM
PaulKotzebue Cracked floors in way of the keel attachement are a sign of trouble. The repair shown in the photograph is inadequate. A proper repair is to sister the floor with another one of at least the same dimensions and bond the sistered floor to the surrounding hull shell. However, whatever caused the floor to crack in the first place may cause the sistered floor to crack also. The limber on centerline is in the worst possible location, which is why the crack is near the center of the floor. The floor should have a quarter round limber at each edge of the keel sump and be full depth at centerline.
04-26-2010 12:02 PM
bellefonte I love this forum. If I could, I would marry it.
04-26-2010 10:23 AM
sailingdog Those aren't stringers, they're floors. Floors run athwartships and stringers run longitudinally...

I'd recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you determine whether this boat is even worth going ahead further with.

I'd ask if the other floor shown in that photo is damaged. It appears to have a crack showing in the top of it, inline with the crack that was "repaired" on the one that is bolted. I'd point out that bolting a floor together in this manner is not a repair in any real sense of the word. At the least it should have been sistered to another board or ground out and repaired by re-glassing the area.

Are the floors wood cored, which was often the case in older boats? If so, is the core material still good? I seriously doubt it.

Personally, given the color of the bilge water, which is heavily stained with either tannins or rust, and the condition of the two bolts seen in the left side of the photo and the cracked floors, I would pass on this boat.

I'd point out that getting a boat of the same make and model in decent shape is often FAR LESS EXPENSIVE than buying the boat in bad shape and refurbishing it.
04-26-2010 07:48 AM
JomsViking That bilge looks nasty too - You need to know what happened, and ask why it has not been repaired properly. Hotdogs advice regarding the joint is good, and you also want to investigate the hull, stringers etc aft of the keel. Sometimes a hard grounding also affects the interior eg. pantry, so take a look at anything around there too.
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