SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy
 Not a Member? 


Thread: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
08-06-2014 03:28 PM
Don0190
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

Personally I have gotten to the point of believing that if a sailor has to ask if a boat is "bluewater" then whatever the boat is the answer is NO. Asking the question pretty much means the sailor isn't really for "bluewater" and therefore neither is the the boat if they are going to be its' skipper.
08-06-2014 02:36 PM
smackdaddy
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

+1 group.

Generally, it's the sailor that makes the boat (whatever it is) blue-water worthy. Not the other way around.
08-06-2014 02:30 PM
AlaskaMC
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

Great writeup Group9. I have been reading about cruising now from many authors while looking for a boat and the responses are so dependent on the source. Ask sailnet, SA, AS, L38 etc for an answer to this question and you get radically different answers but I tend to listen mostly to those that are doing it. And those comments seem to reflect yours most closely.

Read the Steve and Linda Dashaw stuff and it really opens your eyes from folks that have really done it. And they interview folks with lots of boats and get their feelings after the fact. Good reading. (And yes sell and design boats so keep that in mind when reading recommendations. Bet they would say one of theirs is best.)
08-06-2014 07:47 AM
Group9
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

In my mind, there is "offshore" and there is "offshore".

I've sailed across the Gulf of Mexico a few times, and crossed over to the Bahamas a few times. That's kind of offshore, but it's not the same as across the Atlantic Ocean offshore. I realize that.

My boat is without a doubt, classified as a coastal cruiser. It has a wing keel, spade rudder, roller furling, is 42 feet long, and only weighs 22,000 pounds. It has a wide beam and a cabin you can hold a party in. It handles bad weather well and I've never had it in any weather that it was uncomfortable in. The highest wind it's ever sailed through with me on board is about 45 knots and it handled that fine. But, I wouldn't want to be sailing it through a hurricane.

I'm doing with it, exactly what I bought it to do with it. The first boat I bought was a true offshore, sail around the world, take anything boat. I never took it more than 20 miles offshore and at some point I realized I had paid for a lot of boat features that I was never going to use (even though I had bought it dreaming that maybe I would sail around the world in it)

I liken paying more for an offshore boat that will never go offshore, to people who buy heavy duty off road, four wheel drive vehicles, who never leave the pavement. It sure doesn't hurt anything, and if putting their money in features they are never going to use, rather than putting it in features they will use, is what makes them happy, how is it my business to disapprove of their choices?

But, I see a lot of people getting hung up on getting an offshore boat, that a lot of them are never going to take offshore. Nothing wrong with that, though.
08-06-2014 05:58 AM
harmonic
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

A blue water boat should have a strong hull small windows big cockpit drains and over sized rigging,preferably cutter rigged.Mine has a steel hull so I have no issues with keelbolts leaks or chainplates tearing out.
08-06-2014 12:37 AM
agusus
Re: What makes a boat "Blue Water" worthy

Jeff_H, sorry to drag up an old thread, but this answered several questions I had - and as seems to be usual, created several new questions as well.

Could you give some examples of "modern offshore cruisers" you mention in your article? I'm getting into the market and had all the bluewater vs production boat questions, and I think a modern offshore cruiser - if it exists at non-exorbitant prices - might be exactly what I'm looking for.

I see a lot of people have a ton of respect and appreciation for traditional offshore cruisers - the traditional lines, teak decks, etc - but I have zero interest in maintaining teak decks - the less wood the better in fact. I'm not entirely opposed to a traditional pre-1990 offshore cruiser, but if people are valuing the traditional aesthetics that doesn't do much for me since I prefer functional - so I'm better off going after the market where I'm actually paying for what I value, rather than things I don't value (teak, traditional lines, racing equipment, excessive electronics).

With technological progress it seems it'd be possible to make a safe, medium displacement offshore cruiser almost entirely of fiberglass, with a well laid out interior, okay sailing performance, in the pocket to mid-sized cruiser range (30-38 ft).

But looking in the Northwest market (Seattle, Oregon, Alaska), most under 24-year-old boats (post 1990) seem to be performance cruisers and racers, and most pre-1990 bluewater capable boats are the traditional type (Tartans, Hans Christian 38T's).
08-08-2010 02:08 AM
puddinlegs oops... sheaves it is.
08-06-2010 03:13 PM
sailingdog If you're sanding shivs, you're likely in prison or jail... sheaves are found on boats, shivs—a makeshift weapon similar to a knife—are found in prison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by puddinlegs View Post
>14,000 lbs? Depends on the boat A well prepped Olson 40 at just over 10,000 lbs, sure! A Farr 40 of racing fame and similar weight, nope. All that said, I'm a huge sucker for S&S swans even with their limited tankage and hole into the pit companionways.

Regardless of the boat, the running rigging and standing rigging deserve extra attention and preparation. If you think it needs replacing, just do it. One thing that many overlook is carefully sanding shivs... this one simple prep task will do more than almost anything to save halyards. And again, choosing a boat has much to do with the type of sailing you like to do. One man's delight is another's folly. What else? Tankage, sure, especially if the boat is too heavy to sail well in under 15kts of breeze. Water? It's nice, but again, one man's puddle is another's lake. Again, check out the books I mentioned before. They'll do more to help you answer this question than any of our truncated posts will.
08-06-2010 02:58 PM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyPappy View Post
There's a lot of really good info here, and I appreciate everyone's response! I think puddinlegs was right on with his comment about absolutes.

There's definitely "outliers" who will (and have) gone offshore/deep water cruising in almost every type and size of boat. There are always going to be exceptions, but surely there has to be a "general rule"...isn't there?

What is your criteria for a boat to be blue water worthy? For example, do you require a certain amount of fresh water per person per day? Does the rigging need to be of a certain gauge of line? Would you be willing to go over the deep in a boat with a displacement of less than 14,000 lbs?

What is your opinion of the minimum specifications a boat should be in order to be blue water worthy?
>14,000 lbs? Depends on the boat A well prepped Olson 40 at just over 10,000 lbs, sure! A Farr 40 of racing fame and similar weight, nope. All that said, I'm a huge sucker for S&S swans even with their limited tankage and hole into the pit companionways.

Regardless of the boat, the running rigging and standing rigging deserve extra attention and preparation. If you think it needs replacing, just do it. One thing that many overlook is carefully sanding shivs... this one simple prep task will do more than almost anything to save halyards. And again, choosing a boat has much to do with the type of sailing you like to do. One man's delight is another's folly. What else? Tankage, sure, especially if the boat is too heavy to sail well in under 15kts of breeze. Water? It's nice, but again, one man's puddle is another's lake. Again, check out the books I mentioned before. They'll do more to help you answer this question than any of our truncated posts will.
08-06-2010 11:49 AM
HappyPappy There's a lot of really good info here, and I appreciate everyone's response! I think puddinlegs was right on with his comment about absolutes.

There's definitely "outliers" who will (and have) gone offshore/deep water cruising in almost every type and size of boat. There are always going to be exceptions, but surely there has to be a "general rule"...isn't there?

What is your criteria for a boat to be blue water worthy? For example, do you require a certain amount of fresh water per person per day? Does the rigging need to be of a certain gauge of line? Would you be willing to go over the deep in a boat with a displacement of less than 14,000 lbs?

What is your opinion of the minimum specifications a boat should be in order to be blue water worthy?
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:37 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.