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Go Back   SailNet Community > Welcome to Sailnet > SailNet FAQ > Need new chainplates - Where to buy the stainless? 316 vs 2205?
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Thread: Need new chainplates - Where to buy the stainless? 316 vs 2205? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-20-2012 03:26 PM
bluebonnet
Re: Need new chainplates - Where to buy the stainless? 316 vs 2205?

A great place for the best price of 316L SS chainplates with the fastest service is in Texas at Chainplates Express - Home.
They are a machine shop and do their own electro-polishing of the plates
before shipping.
08-08-2010 01:18 PM
mitiempo CapTim
I would take a machine swage over Nicropress but not over a good mechanical fitting like the Hayn HiMod or StaLock. These fittings are superior to any machine swage and very easy to use, particularly the Hayn HiMod.
As far as the Nicropress not only is the correct crimp tool expensive but there is no neat way to do it - you end up with the wire l going around a thimble and then attach that to a turnbuckle. And I doubt the thimbles were chosen with the correct eye sizing for the pins either. It seems to me that someone who is concerned about the thickness of chainplates that lasted decades would want to do a neater job of the wire ends that will last longer.

Congrats on finishing - post a few pictures.
08-08-2010 12:50 PM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by DelmarRey View Post
There is water jet cutting which is what is recommended for SS especial. Laser cuts great too but does create heat. West Coast Waterjet - Precision Water Jet Cutting Metal, Steel, Stone, Glass, Wood - Greater Seattle, WA


YouTube - ‪WATER CUTS STAINLESS STEEL‬‎

BTW-2205 is commonly known as Aqualoy used for prop shafts.
Del: I believe it was West Coast whom we used to cut out my mast step parts and mast ring collar parts out of 3/8 ss...pretty good job.
08-08-2010 12:25 PM
CapTim
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
...

CapTim
I was never a fan of MacGregor but if they rig with nicropress I'm now less of a fan. To maintain strength you need 2 nicropress sleeves on the wire - it is hard to get the same tension on both. When all is said and done a good machined swage is hardly more expensive and a lot neater.
Macs use a spaced double-sleeve nicopress. It's been working like a champ on trailer boats since.. what.. forever? But the rigors of a trailer-sailor are pretty different than something that doesn't come off the water, obviously.

I, too, would take a machine swage over a nicopress or mechanical fitting. But I think it's another case of choosing between several good options, rather than picking the best of a bad bunch. Sort of the opposite of politics, if you will.

Don't forget that most airplanes and hang-gliders are nicopress.. that stuff works like a champ. And it can be rigged quickly in an emergency while on the boat.. something machine sweges can't claim.

But holy fishnuts, batman.. I've really digressed.

Grats on getting the chainplates squared away, Neo!
08-08-2010 12:03 PM
mitiempo DelmarRey
Looks complicated. A plasma torch does a fine job with a lot less equipment. Depending on the model a good thickness can be cut like butter. I don't think anyone uses a laser for cutting in a small shop.

CapTim
I was never a fan of MacGregor but if they rig with nicropress I'm now less of a fan. To maintain strength you need 2 nicropress sleeves on the wire - it is hard to get the same tension on both. When all is said and done a good machined swage is hardly more expensive and a lot neater.
08-08-2010 11:10 AM
neoxaero Thanks for all the responses guys - I actually managed to find a set of chain plates that fit the boat perfectly... I got the mast up and got the sails up since it was a dead calm day here

Now I just need to get some new sheets for the jib, install the traveler track and go sailing.
08-08-2010 02:27 AM
DelmarRey
Quote:
Originally Posted by RXBOT View Post
There is no heat if a shear is used to cut ss plate which is the common practice. A normal cutting torch cannot cut stainless but a plasma arc can. There would be no harm in upgrading to 3/16 plate. Any metal fab shop should have some scrap pieces around big enough to suit your needs.
There is water jet cutting which is what is recommended for SS especial. Laser cuts great too but does create heat. West Coast Waterjet - Precision Water Jet Cutting Metal, Steel, Stone, Glass, Wood - Greater Seattle, WA


YouTube - ‪WATER CUTS STAINLESS STEEL‬‎

BTW-2205 is commonly known as Aqualoy used for prop shafts.
08-07-2010 11:50 PM
CapTim Macgregor has been using the nicopress for a while... he sells a few boats every year. I'm not suggesting nicopress for every application, but it has it's place. Which isn't to say that Brian Toss isn't the rigging god. His book is well worn and still sits with easy reach.

Neoxaero.. were you able to retrieve an entire chainplate, even if it's in two pieces? Most shops will prefer to work from a part, rather than knock something out with just measurements. Of course, either way, you shouldn't have much trouble.. it's a pretty straightforward piece.

Gratz on doing so much work yourself!
08-07-2010 09:49 PM
mitiempo neoxaero
RXBOT is correct - if done properly the new chainplates can be cut from plate material. The edges have to be finished smooth for longevity though, and ideally electropolished.

Did you go to the link posted by Stillraining? Brion Toss is one of the best riggers in the country and his opinion is worth something. He recommends against nicropress except for halyards of 7 x 19 construction, wire not suited for standing rigging. They do not work well on 1 x 19 stainless rigging wire.
08-07-2010 08:52 PM
RXBOT There is no heat if a shear is used to cut ss plate which is the common practice. A normal cutting torch cannot cut stainless but a plasma arc can. There would be no harm in upgrading to 3/16 plate. Any metal fab shop should have some scrap pieces around big enough to suit your needs.
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