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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Before buying your monohull, did you consider ...
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Thread: Before buying your monohull, did you consider ... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-30-2010 11:08 PM
grmitche I had the monohull - and decided to go multi for several reasons. I realized that we didn't really use the interior space that much and that deck space was much more important. With 2 small kids, the level sailing also appeals as a safety factor. We mostly daysail or race, and with my background in skiff sailing, the Express 37 as performance oriented as it is, didn't get the juices flowing. Way too much work and money(sails) to hit 10 knots. The new boat, a 10 year old contour 34, was just north of $50k(kinda a fixer upper) and sails along at 10 knots all day if you sail a bit free and doesn't look too bad. Kids like it too.

And yes - we're sitting in 18" of water there...
08-30-2010 08:34 AM
sailingdog Flipping a cruising size multihull isn't very common at all. This is why they make the news when it happens. Having the keel fall off a monohull or having one sink isn't all that common, and that's why they make the news when it happens.

The two multihulls I've helped right were both racing trimarans, a Contour 30 and a Corsair 28R. Both flipped in the course of racing, and being pushed to the limits of performance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RXBOT View Post
I didn't realize flipping multis back and forth was so common. Reafirms that I will stay with monos, haven't had to flip one yet.
08-30-2010 06:01 AM
RXBOT
flipping multis

I didn't realize flipping multis back and forth was so common. Reafirms that I will stay with monos, haven't had to flip one yet.
08-30-2010 01:45 AM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by dupek View Post
Well put replay, but would be just simple to answer "will not work" or "will work". When someone ask me how to solve problem with car, best to mine knowledge( 8 years as car mechanic), I will try to give to that person a solution. I would not tell them to read the book. That goes for photo/video editing. When asked, I replay with solution(5 years "playing with Vegas Video and doing photo editing for fun). 10 years as semi driver accident free. Some drivers are asking me for advice. I do not tell them to read a book.
I will have to reach for Tylenol from all those "read the book" advices.
Sailing and driving a car... it's rocks and apples. "will" or "will not" work often has many many variables and degrees when it comes to sailing. IMHO, it's much more complex than driving a car. Imagine someone coming to your shop having only seen a car from 100 yards away, had never driven, nor having looked up a diagram that labelled things like 'door', 'engine', 'clutch', etc... but wants to know what type of tires he should put on the Ferrari he briefly read something about, or was it a Pinto? Point being, people who come to your shop have a car. They drive. They may or may not know the specifics of how their engine works. If they don't, they pay you to fix it with minimal questions. If they want to fix it themselves, wouldn't you appreciate someone who's done some homework before they approached you with a list of questions? It'd be a much better use of both parties time.
08-29-2010 11:28 PM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Actually, it depends on the size of the boat and how it is floating. On smaller ones, say up to about 36' LOA, you often don't need to do that...

The method I've used is to attach lines—using the boat's anchor bridle is a good way and gives you two solid points to attach to—to the end that is floating higher and bring it over the boat's bottom to the other side, where you use a power boat to tow the line. As you apply pressure, the high side will lift a bit higher, and the water inside the boat will shift towards the low side, causing it to sink further... and the boat will slowly flip end over end. With a larger boat, you may need to use a drogue or anchor to secure the low end and help bring it under.
Neet trick!...I can visulize it clearly now.
08-29-2010 10:55 PM
smackdaddy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimsy View Post
DOn't worry. I'll bet Dog will be along shortly and he is very knowledgeable about multi hulls as well as the air velocity of swallows- both laden and unladen.
African or European.

08-29-2010 10:52 PM
smackdaddy I hear the Seabrake is perfect for flipping a multi. Just make sure to plot your position first. Heh-heh. I miss old Albert! Dude was a hoot!
08-29-2010 10:42 PM
sailingdog Actually, it depends on the size of the boat and how it is floating. On smaller ones, say up to about 36' LOA, you often don't need to do that...

The method I've used is to attach lines—using the boat's anchor bridle is a good way and gives you two solid points to attach to—to the end that is floating higher and bring it over the boat's bottom to the other side, where you use a power boat to tow the line. As you apply pressure, the high side will lift a bit higher, and the water inside the boat will shift towards the low side, causing it to sink further... and the boat will slowly flip end over end. With a larger boat, you may need to use a drogue or anchor to secure the low end and help bring it under.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillraining View Post
Oi

My limited engineering skill doesn't see this happening...Are you employing some sort of gantry ( Gin pole) to effect a vertical pull?...What is to keep the upturned hulls from just moving in line with the pulling force...where as against the beams you have resistance to work in your favor.
08-29-2010 09:13 PM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I'd point out that many cruising multihulls can be righted from an inverted position by a relatively small powerboat by pulling it end over end. Generally, this works fairly well and doesn't cause as much damage as trying to flip a multihull sideways.... which they're specifically engineered to resist and usually ends up with severe damage to the mast and rigging.
Oi

My limited engineering skill doesn't see this happening...Are you employing some sort of gantry ( Gin pole) to effect a vertical pull?...What is to keep the upturned hulls from just moving in line with the pulling force...where as against the beams you have resistance to work in your favor.
08-29-2010 08:48 PM
Omatako
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpickering View Post
My wife will likely prefer the lack of heeling, speed and comfort of the smaller cat as compared to an equivalent or larger monohull.
I'm sure what you meant to say was "My wife preferred the speed, comfort and lack of heeling of a smaller cat . . . ."
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