SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > roller furling problems
 Not a Member? 


Thread: roller furling problems Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
02-23-2007 09:46 AM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
IPW....I'm surprised anyone is still making a behind mast unit as they've been thoroughly dissed over the years. I would get a boom furler if you don't want to go for standard in-mast furling.
Can't answer your other questions but intuitively the system does not seem safe for sea to me as you must be luffing to roll em up...or in light winds.
On top of that, you're adding significant weight aloft and a good deal of windage.
02-23-2007 12:16 AM
camaraderie IPW....I'm surprised anyone is still making a behind mast unit as they've been thoroughly dissed over the years. I would get a boom furler if you don't want to go for standard in-mast furling.
Can't answer your other questions but intuitively the system does not seem safe for sea to me as you must be luffing to roll em up...or in light winds.
02-22-2007 08:21 PM
Looking
External Mains'l Furling

I am re-posting this here to see if it can get any action.

Does anybody have any experience with external mainsail furling systems?

Facnor:
http://www.facnor.com/uk/main.asp?ur...p&f=2,12,,23,a

or Nemo:
http://www.nemoindustrie.com/mainsai...ng-systems.htm

I am curious if:
a) they could stand up to Off shore duty
b) can accommodate full vertical battens
c) can be mounted on a wooded spar

Cheers,
Andrew
02-22-2007 08:10 PM
bmintz
harken or hood

Quote:
Originally Posted by pipedream47
I have an Endevour 40, 1983, with a Harken Roller Furling, same year. It's almost impossible to furl in the genoa in any winds above 15 knots. I would like to install a new furling system and would like some feedback on which is the most effective, easy to furl in, system.

Do you have a harken or a Hood? I have the same boat and year, it is with a Hood. I am trying to find a part for the unit. Have you replaced it? Do you still have the parts?
07-10-2006 07:41 AM
Rickm505 Most furlers have lower bearings and some have uppers, which require periodic maintenence. Grease em up and they're problem free for another year or so.

Rick in Florida
07-07-2006 03:26 PM
captainbrad When I used to work as a sailmaker, I bought a Pro-furl for my Ericson 27 through the loft. I had experience with lots of differenct furlers from racing on other boats, including a Harken on my dad's Tartan 37. The Pro-furl is the BEST DAMN FURLER EVER MADE as far as I'm concerned! It is extremely well enginered of titanium and aircraft alluminum, it can be installed in a number of versatile configurations, and I've never had any problems with it! It does have some quirks, and they may have changed some of those since I bought mine 6 years ago, but I have no complaints. This is the brand that (last I knew) most of the around-alone type sailors were prefering. The foil comes in sections, which I was skeptical about, but the design is so good that it is actually advantageous! They use a graphite insert "bearing" at each joint in the foil to keep the stay centered in the foil, making it much easier to roll up since you avoid the flopping around you get from the Harken style one piece foils. Mind you, I'm not up on what's on the market right now, just when I was looking back then. Anyway, I have always had a paradigm that any improvement I make to the boat has to meet the standard of being able to hold up to a trip around the world, just incase I decide to do that with this boat. The pro-furl definately fits that bill! You won't be dissappointed!

-Brad
07-07-2006 12:30 PM
svojala Keep a tight forestaty and a relatively loose jib halliard. Also, be careful that the jib is not a touch too long, allowing the top of the furling unit to bind at the mast head.
07-02-2006 09:01 PM
sailingdog Furlex and Harken are both quite good... I have a Schaefer for the asym on my boat and a Furlex for the genny.
07-02-2006 08:01 PM
Newport41 Schaefer, still the best. Easy to furl by hand even with a 150 in twenty-five knots on a reach. But probably the most expensive too.
07-02-2006 02:33 PM
Warren M. While most posters indicate that they furl their headsails with the boat headed into the wind, after experimenting with my newish Furlex 200, I've found that being slightly off wind on a broadish reach works best for me. With a bit of the mainsail blanketing the headsail, I begin to slack off on the leeward sheet, but keep it somewhat under control. I then begin to haul in the furling line, let out a bit more sheet, and furl some more. While it may seem like you need 3 hands to do this, a bit of practice makes it easier. Find the sweet spot for your boat to be in, make sure all your furler parts are lubricated, and ensure that you don't have excessive tension on your headsail luff and you not have too much difficulty rolling up your headsail.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:17 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.