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  Topic Review (Newest First)
3 Weeks Ago 02:32 PM
MarkSF
Re: Epoxy Barrier coat

If the hull was dried out, and new moisture penetration is now being prevented, or at least greatly reduced, by the epoxy layer, I think you have a reasonable cause to expect that there will be no more, or at least very few, more blisters.

I think the question now is what's happening inside the hull. Do you have a bilge that sits full of water all the time? It would be a good idea to keep it dry.

I think the case here is that Interlux 1000 and 2000 together are like belt and braces. Right now you only have a belt. Well. that's better than having your trousers fall down.

It's an old boat. Are you really going to strip off the bottom paint, and paint on Interlux 2000, to fix blisters you don't have yet?
3 Weeks Ago 10:04 AM
boatpoker
Re: Epoxy Barrier coat

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
what is interprotect but an epoxy layer? It sounds like whatever epoxy was put on your hull simply doesn''t have a fancy marketing name. Despite fancy names and advertising, epoxy (like gasoline) is epoxy. If you''ve got a layer of it, it doesn''t matter who made it. If there aren''t any blisters now in a 1981 boat, it sounds like you''re trying to fix a problem you don''t have. Get some new sails instead, you''ll have more fun.
+1
3 Weeks Ago 12:48 AM
fallard
Re: Epoxy Barrier coat

According to the manufacturer, Interlux 2000 is specifically formulated to minimize water infiltration, whereas "regular" epoxy, like Interlux 1000 is suitable as a sealing layer for the bare fiberglass exposed when gel coat is removed. In other words, after stripping gel coat (and making any repairs to delaminated areas exposed) you would apply a couple of coats of clear, "regular" epoxy to seal the laminate, followed by multiple epoxy barrier coats (Interlux 2000). The 2000 product would be added in as many coats necessary to build up to the thickness of the old gelcoat, assuming you need to fair it into the gelcoat above the waterline. When I stripped the hull of a previous sailboat 25 years ago, it took about 2 coats of 1000 and 7 coats of 2000 to get the proper build up.
3 Weeks Ago 10:11 PM
rioux.lm@bell.net
Re: Epoxy Barrier coat

HI
I sure like that answer , way to go ,
11-07-2000 03:13 AM
Jeff_H
Epoxy Barrier coat

Putting an epoxy barrier coat over a properly applied epoxy laminate is like wrapping a plastic bag in a waxed paper bag. Depending on whose products were used and how they were applied, there are few plastic materials that are more water impermeable than epoxy resin. Un-thickened epoxies (like WEST System, MAS and System 3) work best with final overcoats of their own epoxy resin.

Putting another product over this layer is un-necessary and frankly potentially less successful.

In my opinion the only reason that the epoxy paint (which has pigments and solvents and therefore is more permeable than the resin) is added is to provide a "marker" coat so you don''t actually sand down into the epoxy resin coats. Also, Epoxy does not stand up to UV very well and so the epoxy paint coat acts as a sunshield to protect the epoxy resin should there be a time when the boat is out of the water and the raw resin is exposed.

I do question the replacement of only the gelcoat as a proper repair method. Rarely is the problem only in the gelcoat. Usually the problem is actually in the laminate below the Gelcoat. Merely replacing the gelcoat with a an unreinforced resin (or barrier coat) layer rarely solves the problem. Most qualified repair people that I have talked to seem to suggest at least a single layer of epoxy reinforced with glass cloth as a proper cure. The gelcoat layer is too thin to provide a thick enough and strong enough repair to be a permanent solution. A paint on barrier won''t change that.

Respectfully

Jeff
11-06-2000 03:59 AM
stevemorrell
Epoxy Barrier coat

Maybe I did not leave enough information there. The boat did have blisters several years ago and the boat was dried out and the original gel coat removed, then an epoxy "resin" coat was put on to replace the gel coat. This is like Interprotect 1000/1001 or Epiglass HT 9000 resin as recommended by Interlux. Then, as reccomended by Interlux, an epoxy paint is applied. This boat never had the epoxy paint applied, but did have the epoxy resin.
11-05-2000 06:31 PM
paulk
Epoxy Barrier coat

What is Interprotect but an epoxy layer? It sounds like whatever epoxy was put on your hull simply doesn''t have a fancy marketing name. Despite fancy names and advertising, epoxy (like gasoline) is epoxy. If you''ve got a layer of it, it doesn''t matter who made it. If there aren''t any blisters now in a 1981 boat, it sounds like you''re trying to fix a problem you don''t have. Get some new sails instead, you''ll have more fun.
11-05-2000 06:28 AM
stevemorrell
Epoxy Barrier coat

I am looking into purchasing a 1981 Ericson 38 which apparently (and confirmed on inspection) has no blisters because of a previous gel coat job where it was removed and replaced with an epoxy layer but never given an epoxy barrier coat like Interprotect 2000E/20001E. It has bottom paint directly on the epoxy. I believe this needs to be applied as soon as possible, but the antifouling was just put on new. Does anyone out there have an opinion on this? Should the new antifouling be immediately removed and the barrier coat applied or should one wait a year till the bottom paint needs to be redone and do it then? How urgent do people believe this is? The epoxy job was done about three years ago.

Steve Morrell

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