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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Loose Foot Main sail vs Foot Bolt Rope in boom Track
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Thread: Loose Foot Main sail vs Foot Bolt Rope in boom Track Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-10-2011 08:37 PM
genieskip Another huge advantage, for me anyway, to going loose footed is that when I pulled the bolt rope out of the boom I had a place to for a bolt rope for the stack pack that I made for the sail. Sailrite's plan for the stack pack is to bolt or rivet two channels on the boom, one on either side, to hold the bottom edge of the stack pack. By using the slot previously occupied by the foot of the sail I had a very solid anchor point for the bottom of the stack pack. And the sail sets and reefs better as a bonus. Win - win all around.
02-04-2011 05:00 PM
centaursailor
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
If you read the post I was replying to, the poster said:



He was going to remove the bolt rope from most of the foot and use the bolt rope remnants instead of adding slugs, which is why I replied the way I did.
Jez, look what happens when you go to sleep. He being me was looking at options.
Always best to theorize before getting the tools out. Bolt rope still secure.
All good stuff tho.
Happy reefing, eventually.
02-04-2011 01:43 PM
AdamLein Ah, makes sense.
02-04-2011 01:37 PM
sailingdog This is normally more of an issue if your reefing lines run internally in the boom..since those are basically on centerline.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Well, there's a cheek block on the other side of the boom that redirects the reefline toward the gooseneck, and eventually back to the cockpit. So wouldn't that balance it out? I haven't noticed torquing the boom while reefing, but maybe I haven't been paying close enough attention. Certainly if you were to pull straight down on the reefing line from the cringle on the side further from the terminal end, I could see the torque issue coming up.
02-04-2011 01:01 PM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
One advantage of the line around the boom is that the line doesn't tend to torque the boom and twist it out of vertical like a hardware attachment point can.
Well, there's a cheek block on the other side of the boom that redirects the reefline toward the gooseneck, and eventually back to the cockpit. So wouldn't that balance it out? I haven't noticed torquing the boom while reefing, but maybe I haven't been paying close enough attention. Certainly if you were to pull straight down on the reefing line from the cringle on the side further from the terminal end, I could see the torque issue coming up.
02-04-2011 12:01 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Aha... that's pretty clear. Now I see why I was confused: on my boom (attached foot), there's hardware bolted onto the boom that the terminal end of the leech reefing lines are tied to with bowlines. On the one hand, it eliminates the need for the extra grommets you're talking about; on the other hand, it's a source of frequent snags and a modicum of chafe.
One advantage of the line around the boom is that the line doesn't tend to torque the boom and twist it out of vertical like a hardware attachment point can.
02-04-2011 11:40 AM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The terminal end of the reefing clew and tack lines are usually attached to the boom by tying a bowline around the standing part of the line after looping it around the boom.
Aha... that's pretty clear. Now I see why I was confused: on my boom (attached foot), there's hardware bolted onto the boom that the terminal end of the leech reefing lines are tied to with bowlines. On the one hand, it eliminates the need for the extra grommets you're talking about; on the other hand, it's a source of frequent snags and a modicum of chafe.
02-04-2011 11:22 AM
Liquorice Taking the bolt rope out of the boom and attaching at tack and clew isn't going to make you a loose footed main.
The foot of the sail is still shaped in 3 dimensions to make the shelf, and that's still there, so the shape will be wrong.
When you convert a sail to loose foot you have to reshape, recut the lower panels to remove the fullness at mid boom where the sail turns sharply back toward the boom. This involves removing the rope; recutting or replacing 1 or more panels and altering the broad seaming to flatten the sail verically. Then strengthening the foot with a new folded hem. If you don't do this you'll have a funny looking cupped shape at the bottom of the sail. It may involve messing with the lower part of luff and leech too!
That's why sailmakers always charge more than you think they should - there's more going into the work than you can see once it' s completed.
There - I feel better now!
02-04-2011 11:17 AM
cruisingdream My old sail was a shelf foot I got a new loose foot sail last year and wouldn't go back , the loose foot is so much easier to adjust the outhaul & get the sail shape you want.
02-04-2011 10:40 AM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
It almost seems that I could just take my bolt rope main out of the groove in the boom and use the existing hook at the gooseneck and the slug I have now at the clew to make it a loose foot.

Are there any problems with this approach? Should I have the grommet at the clew reinforced in some way? Is it really necessary to have the bolt rope removed?
No, you shouldn't remove the bolt rope. You'd want to use a longer slug that is more heavily attached than your current one, since the current one was installed expecting most of the loading to be on the boltrope.
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