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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > How to Learn Boat Building in San Diego, suggestions, advice, etc. wanted
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Thread: How to Learn Boat Building in San Diego, suggestions, advice, etc. wanted Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-04-2011 03:09 PM
kgruskin
Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
Did you even click on the Link I gave you?? Maritime Museum of San Diego Join and volunteer! With all the boats and ships they have there you SHOULD BE ABLE TO connect with a builder!
Yes I did check out the link you sent. I'll give them a call and stop by next week after the holiday weekend and craziness is over.

WD,

I appreciate the offer but if the expectation would be I progressed through the normal ranks then I don't think it would work out with my schedule. I wouldn't say I'm completely unskilled but I also wouldn't say I'm skilled either. In the past I've built custom cabinetry, rebuilt my first car when I was 16, have a degree in computer science and engineering so my math is pretty good, and I've done some manufacturing while in engineering.


Again thanks for all the advice so far and I hope everyone enjoys their 4th of July.
07-04-2011 10:32 AM
WDS123 There is a pleasure and pride the shop has in creating a beautiful boat which makes it worthwhile.
07-04-2011 10:20 AM
deniseO30 Sounds glamorous WD!
07-04-2011 10:14 AM
WDS123 Factory work isn't for the faint of heart. We are now on summer hours 6am to 2:30pm with the occasional mandatory overtime. Less than 1/2 of new hires unfamiliar with factory work make it past 2 weeks.

new unskilled hires are put on grinding detail ( 8 hours a day ), once they master grinding they get moved up to molding and laminating, after that two different paths either detailing or assembly. A smart talented person with a good foundation might take 3 years to become a full assembly team member.

Assembly starts out as a parts runner, then moves up to a assi't installer, then to a jr. Installer, then to a team member.

Becoming a full fledged team member in the carpentry shop has fewer steps, but takes longer time. A ships carpenter is a skill that takes a very very long time to master, even in at a fiberglass boat builder.

Becoming lead in the rigging shop requires that 3 people ahead of you retire.2 are in their early 30s.
07-04-2011 08:57 AM
deniseO30 Did you even click on the Link I gave you?? Maritime Museum of San Diego Join and volunteer! With all the boats and ships they have there you SHOULD BE ABLE TO connect with a builder! Most of Glen L designs are nice but only few are offered for traditional construction. I suggest you study Gardner, Herreshof, and others to get a real handle on the way boats are built. It's very important to know about traditional building.

At 34 you may have your 30ft dream done when your around 50. Unless you work on it full time. The budget will be around $100,000 maybe another 60,000 to outfit the boat. but those are just conservative numbers.

PS; WD has made you a great offer I'd be on my way already!
07-04-2011 02:09 AM
kgruskin WDShock,

Yeah, I would be willing to work for free. The only problem with that Corona is I work Monday through Friday in San Diego so I'd only be available early mornings or evenings during the week (Corona is too far to pick up a few hours at the beginning or end of each weekday) so that really only leaves the weekends. However I'm sure I could not go in on on a Mondays or Fridays every week if I made up the hours on any other day during the week. In exchange for the free labor I would want to learn how to build though.

I'm not in a position where the money part of this is really important. The education is what is valuable to me in this endeavor. That and possibly some warehouse space to build (not a requirement at all). If you are serious about the offer let me know and we can talk off-line about it or just PM me on here. My work schedule in San Diego is fairly flexible so maybe something could be worked out.
07-04-2011 01:57 AM
WDS123 Work for free ?

Come up to Corona, we'll teach you
07-04-2011 01:39 AM
kgruskin Thanks for the info. Does anyone have any experience using any of the Glen-l.com boat designs. Some of the little powerboats look fun to build in terms of fun projects to gain experience as you move up in size.

15' Cracker Box - rear-cockpit speed boat-www.boatdesigns.com
07-04-2011 01:08 AM
fryewe Visit John Welsford's website and Duckworks. Good info at both on building small to medium size (19 ft) boats. Welsford boat builders have a Yahoo forum with a ton of info about building most of his models.
07-03-2011 11:51 PM
kgruskin I'm not looking for a career in boat building just to gain the knowledge. At 34 years old I don't think it is too late. Obviously it would have been better to learn while I lived around Annapolis over a summers in high school or college but I didn't have a desire then. The issue is finding any active boat building programs here in San Diego. I've looked but just haven't been able to find anything.

Any suggestions on good books to start with?
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