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  Topic Review (Newest First)
16 Hours Ago 10:18 AM
mbianka
Re: dead reefs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brezzin View Post
I've dove all of those. French reef is my favorite because of the swim troughs. Key West is even worse as far as dead reefs go. There is hope though. They are finding that reefs can revive at a faster rate than previously thought and there are plenty of scientists committed to this area of research.

Dr. Mary Hagedorn a Smithsonian fellow currently at the University of Hawaii is one of these committed people.


‪Meet Our Scientist: Mary Hagedorn - Coral Science‬‏ - YouTube

Help Mary Save Coral | Home
Just spent 12 days cruising the Maldives and the reefs seem quite healthy. Yes there were a few barren spots but, that looked like storm damage from the debris scattered on the other side. I'm currently chillin' at the Cocoa Island resort and they have set up a Coral Nursery in their lagoon that seems to be doing quite well. A school juvenile Pyramid Angelfish are using them for shelter from the lurking Trumpet fish already.
1 Day Ago 11:49 PM
ReefMagnet
Re: dead reefs

It is. Over commercialisation and sedimentary runoff are far bigger threats to reefs then global warming at the moment.

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk
1 Day Ago 07:39 PM
jppp
Re: dead reefs

Well that's good news then.
1 Day Ago 07:21 PM
ReefMagnet
Re: dead reefs

Quote:
Originally Posted by jppp View Post
"There's no denying that the Great Barrier Reef is in serious trouble. According to a report by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, 93% of the reef is affected by bleaching, putting the reef in danger of extinction. Bleaching occurs when coral are put under extreme stress by changes in conditions like temperature, light, or nutrients. In these conditions, they expel symbiotic algae from their tissues, causing them to turn white. "

" But the effects are serious and possibly permanent. "The reef is no longer as resilient as it once was, and it's struggling to cope with three bleaching events in just 18 years," he said.
93% of the reef is in serious trouble? There's misconstrued facts and outright lies. That quote above falls into the latter.
1 Day Ago 07:05 PM
jppp
Re: dead reefs

"There's no denying that the Great Barrier Reef is in serious trouble. According to a report by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, 93% of the reef is affected by bleaching, putting the reef in danger of extinction. Bleaching occurs when coral are put under extreme stress by changes in conditions like temperature, light, or nutrients. In these conditions, they expel symbiotic algae from their tissues, causing them to turn white. "

" But the effects are serious and possibly permanent. "The reef is no longer as resilient as it once was, and it's struggling to cope with three bleaching events in just 18 years," he said.
1 Day Ago 06:11 PM
travlin-easy
Re: dead reefs

Len, dynaflagellite algae doesn't grow on live coral. I won't worry too much about the reefs at this stage of my life - gotta keep on sailin for as long as I can draw a breath into my lungs. When I no longer can, just as health issues hit me three weeks ago, it won't make a lot of difference. I'LL BE DEAD!

Gary
1 Day Ago 02:01 PM
Capt Len
Re: dead reefs

Parrot fish don't prove squat. Last I looked they chew chunks of LIVE coral . In the long term corals will likely survive somewhere .Maybe even parrot fish to eat it.
1 Day Ago 01:53 PM
travlin-easy
Re: dead reefs

I will be more than happy to do so when you provide some direct evidence in the form of specific scientific documents that conclusive prove this hypothesis.

Dead coral has been around for millions of years, and it's dead coral that makes up that sugar white sand in the tropical regions of the globe. Essentially, that sand is parrotfish poop. The parrotfish consume the dynaflagillate algae that forms on dead coral and in the process of consuming the algae, they scrape off bits and pieces of dead coral, grind it up with those parrot bill looking teeth, inject the mush, then squirt out the ground, dead coral through their anal vent. This is well documented and can be seen here:


Enjoy the world you have inherited - it's the best you will ever get,

Gary
1 Day Ago 12:50 PM
capta
Re: dead reefs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
The earth is changing - many species will die off, and others will adapt and evolve. It's happened many many times to our planet. Nothing to get worried about.
Tell that to all the folks who will be in the path of stronger and more deadly storms in Europe and Australasia, stronger and more deadly hurricanes in the Caribbean and coastal America because of the unnaturally rapid global warming that is scientifically proven to be caused by humans. Tell that to the coastal communities and islanders whose habitat is disappearing at an unprecedented rate by the rising oceans.
Nope, nothing at all to get worried about, unless you live on planet earth.
1 Day Ago 12:15 PM
travlin-easy
Re: dead reefs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
The earth is changing - many species will die off, and others will adapt and evolve. It's happened many many times to our planet. Nothing to get worried about.
So true. That's why we still have cockroaches and rats.

Gary
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