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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.
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Thread: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-14-2014 10:30 PM
snippys_dad
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Chch for sail , if I buy can any one give me a tow back to nz ?
09-13-2014 10:03 PM
smurphny
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Night_Sailor View Post
Probably the most important attribute of a good sailor is to be humble and admit your mistakes. The cocky sailors, get into trouble and don't learn from their mistakes. The humble sailor recognizes he can learn from anyone and constantly gets better. It sure beats golf where we tend to get worse not better.
There is a big difference between self confidence and excessive hubris. Folks with real self confidence have no problem whatsoever in admitting and discussing mistakes. They have nothing to prove to anyone and are always willing to use mistakes to learn. Discussing mistakes with others is a way they learn. They are not acting any part. Those with excessive hubris are not willing to share their mistakes nor modify their preconceived notions because they are afraid others may jostle their little house of cards.
09-13-2014 08:02 PM
JonEisberg
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
I hope to hell the Cha-Cha skipper learned. Because thanks to Drake...he lived.
Littauer sounds like a slow learner, to me...

Cha Cha Going on the Block | www.newportthisweek.com | Newport This Week

I call it a happy ending, if that clown is off the ocean for awhile...

:-)
09-13-2014 12:16 AM
snippys_dad
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Hey thanks for that , I learned alot about complacency to be honest he told my similar story ,when it goes wrong it does spectacular ly , the naysayers can say what they like he was a very honest account and out there doing it . 5 stars .
09-12-2014 09:55 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Smack, I agree - you should always help someone in distress - ALWAYS!

I watched this some time ago, and some of the things Drake did just didn't make much sense to me, especially deploying the parachute off the stern while heaving to. Seemed like a good way to take a big wave over the stern. And, it surely would not help him achieve the proper 50 degree bow angle needed to stem the vessel's progress.

I also could not believe he did not have stop knots in his halyards or sheets - I always thought that was just common sense, but maybe I'm wrong.

Also wondered why Cha Cha could not have rigged an emergency steering system. Maybe her captain was just dumb as dirt - at least it seemed that way.

Cheers,

Gary
Trav..that's just it. When you live...you learn.

I hope to hell the Cha-Cha skipper learned. Because thanks to Drake...he lived.
09-12-2014 09:42 PM
travlineasy
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Smack, I agree - you should always help someone in distress - ALWAYS!

I watched this some time ago, and some of the things Drake did just didn't make much sense to me, especially deploying the parachute off the stern while heaving to. Seemed like a good way to take a big wave over the stern. And, it surely would not help him achieve the proper 50 degree bow angle needed to stem the vessel's progress.

I also could not believe he did not have stop knots in his halyards or sheets - I always thought that was just common sense, but maybe I'm wrong.

Also wondered why Cha Cha could not have rigged an emergency steering system. Maybe her captain was just dumb as dirt - at least it seemed that way.

Cheers,

Gary
09-12-2014 09:00 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Night_Sailor View Post
I can assure you I would not be so quick to render assistance. The completeness of the problems on Cha Cha clearly indicated the skipper should have been disregarded as an intelligent sailor, and my concerns would have been for his crew.
BS.

You need to help a fellow sailor regardless of your assumptions. EVERYONE deserves help when they are in distress*. Period. If you're really that self-assured get off the ocean. Save the lecture for when you are home.

(*Drake knew that. Which is why I respect him.)
09-12-2014 08:51 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
Originally Posted by jameswilson29

"Both skippers would have likely been able to reduce sail area at the critical time more effectively and quickly by dropping a hanked-on jib to the deck and securing it, instead of having to contend with an uncooperative roller furling system."

For my 2 cents worth, if one is having that much trouble furling a jib, I'm not too sure I want to be on the foredeck wrestling a hanked sail down and either tie it to the lifelines or unhank it and get it below. Much better to learn to work the furler in heavy weather, IMO.
Bingo.
09-12-2014 08:43 PM
Argyle38
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Night_Sailor View Post
Probably the most important attribute of a good sailor is to be humble and admit your mistakes. The cocky sailors, get into trouble and don't learn from their mistakes. The humble sailor recognizes he can learn from anyone and constantly gets better. It sure beats golf where we tend to get worse not better.
Good advice.

If you're feeling cocky, go to sea. If your not humbled by the time you get back, you weren't out long enough.
09-12-2014 07:17 PM
JTSmith
Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
As far as I've seen - yes. He does a lot of big sailing in a lot of nice places on a lot of nice boats. It's not like he's a complete newb.

Check out his YouTube channel.

(PS - I like the part where he admits his real fear in some pretty scary conditions, and I like that you can see him really mulling over what it will mean to answer that Pan-Pan. It's really great stuff. From a joyous dinner on night one to 6 more days of exhausted hell. His boat sure did right by him.)
The tension was absolutely palpable when the Pan-Pan came through. Highlight of the series. I've seen a few of his other shorts and was sort of on the fence about him. This made me like him.
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