SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Teak crack
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Teak crack Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
04-20-2013 01:47 PM
paul323
Re: Teak crack

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchard View Post
I cannot agree with you here. Simply injecting acetone does nothing. Acetone is a solvent, it acts by dissolving and/or holding in suspension the contaminants you want to remove....
Yeah, agreed; it is not perfect, but I have had some success using the acetone syringe to dissolve/flush out, uses up a bit of acetone, though. It is difficult to get things really clean if you can't wipe deep into the crack (sorry, couldn't resist).

I was just offering other options...(clearly the butterfly does not work well for this, but the chart table crack perhaps). Not very keen on the dremel/fill with wood-dust/epoxy personally - good for cosmetic repairs (used it many times), but the weakness introduced by the crack will still be there, and I don't know if it would hold when redrilled. Also as somebody mentioned regluing a previously glued crack is almost always a mess. So you are probably right - replacement is best, or the dutchman if space/skill allows.
04-20-2013 01:21 PM
SloopJonB
Re: Teak crack

I can't help thinking that it would be a hell of a lot simpler and easier to simply replace it with something a little beefier.

Even if you did manage to glue the crack together, you're no better off than you were originally - a too thin piece that will simply crack again - next time alongside the glue line if your gluing was strong.
04-20-2013 09:47 AM
RobGallagher
Re: Teak crack

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchard View Post
Paul323, how do you propose to thoroughly clean out a crack?
Sailnet quote of the week!

(sorry, it's early, that post made the coffee come out my nose and sometimes I just can't help myself)
04-20-2013 09:43 AM
sww914
Re: Teak crack

After the Gorilla Glue in there, I don't imagine that any other glue will stick well. It will turn into a glue burrito from hell. Well, maybe a glue quesadilla is a more apt description.
I think that you've already decided to replace the whole piece and that, IMO, indicates mental health.
04-20-2013 08:50 AM
Minnewaska
Re: Teak crack

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchard View Post
.......Minnewaska could consider a spline repair if the crack is long and kind of straight. That would involve setting up a jig so that you could use a router to cut a fresh clean square channel where the crack is, then make a spline out of a bit of teak to fit into the channel. Once the channel is solvent cleaned, West System is your best pal in the adhesive department. Glue in the spline, sand it flush, finish with varnish.
This probably is the right thing to do, but a bit challenging.

To describe the crack a bit better, the piece is close to a 1" x 2" strip that is approx 3 feet long. It lies on its flat 2" wide side to made a piece of trim on the cabin top. It serves no purpose other than decorative. The crack is along the lengthwise grain in the wood. It extend approx 2/3rds the length of the piece, out the end grain at one end, but not entirely to the other end. Therefore, the piece would not come in two, if removed. It is screwed down with the holes plugged with teak dowel.

I could drill the dowels out and remove it easily enough. However, there is some structural integrity to the piece that would be destroyed, if I completed the break. I suspect that just separating it enough to get some epoxy inside could break it anyway.

I don't currently intend to varnish it, as I've adopted the grey look on all teak outside of the cockpit. Although, unless it is fully sealed, no varnish product would ever stay adhered to it.
04-20-2013 08:44 AM
windnrock
Re: Teak crack

Ditto on wedging open the crack and using a syringe to glue deep. If you use polyester glue, the wood needs to have moisture, as in H2O. If you clean with Acetone or any other solvent you will dry it out and the glue will not bond well. Even just breathing hard on the area(like cleaning your glasses) will help. Clamp firmly but don't squeeze all the glue out. The glue should foam out of the crack if it is working correctly and the pressure of the cure will force it into all voids. Be sure to put paper under the work to catch dripping glue and tape off around the crack. As it stops dripping and foaming you can wipe the area with a damp cloth to clean up uncured polyester glue. The board does look a bit thin but if you use a very long screw and pre drill you should be good for a while. It may fail along a different portion of grain if stressed too much.
04-19-2013 11:17 PM
Ritchard
Re: Teak crack

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul323 View Post

I would gently pry the crack open, and then inject acetone (typically your local epoxy/fiberglass shop sells syringes).
I cannot agree with you here. Simply injecting acetone does nothing. Acetone is a solvent, it acts by dissolving and/or holding in suspension the contaminants you want to remove. But you must immediately wipe it away, or 30 seconds later the acetone has flashed, and the contaminants are re-deposited exactly where they were before. You can't wipe away acetone that you have injected into a crack.

The crack originally described in this thread may not have been contaminated with crud, but the teak oils will still be there. Minnewaska's crack, if it faces the sky, will doubtless be full of atmospheric crud as well as teak oil. Better to cleanly dremel out a crack and be able to get a putty knife wrapped in a thin rag in there splashed with acetone (or my new favourite, interlux solvent wash - flashes much more slowly) to properly clean the crack and actually remove the contaminants.

In the case of the problem originally described in this thread, unless you have pretty great woodworking skills and steady hands, opening up the crack with a dremel upside down from below would end up looking like a dog's @ss. So unless it is a huge drama to remove the piece, replacing it just makes more sense. I think in the long run, it would ikely take less time and frustration than any in-place repair would. Minnewaska's crack is facing up (I think?), so it might be more possible to do a passable job of opening up the crack to clean it out properly. A crack opened up and cleaned can be carefully filled with thickened epoxy. My recipe for thickener in places it will be seen is 2 parts teak flour (sanding dust) to one part West 404. Teak flour alone is too dark, almost dark chocolate when set up, 404 is too white. Together they make a very strong filler that when set up is pretty close to the finished teak colour.

The dutchman and butterfly patch methods you linked to are really great methods, but require rather advanced skills and good tools to come out not looking like the same dog's backside described above. Furthermore, doing those joints in place upside down in the case of the original post, would be a remarkable feat of both acrobatics and carpentry. I am going to do a dutchman repair in the cockpit coaming of my dock neighbours' boat, but it's a fairly large dutchman repair, about 2-1/2x8 inches so much easier. As well we will have all the time in the world to work the joint with a router and sharp chisels while debating the merits of real beer vs Bud Light with lime.

Minnewaska could consider a spline repair if the crack is long and kind of straight. That would involve setting up a jig so that you could use a router to cut a fresh clean square channel where the crack is, then make a spline out of a bit of teak to fit into the channel. Once the channel is solvent cleaned, West System is your best pal in the adhesive department. Glue in the spline, sand it flush, finish with varnish.
04-19-2013 05:17 PM
Minnewaska
Re: Teak crack

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul323 View Post
Thanks for the idea, although, I would have to do the sister piece to match. Looks like a lot of work.
04-19-2013 04:35 PM
paul323
Re: Teak crack

Image of butterfly inlay (may help minnewaska):
Butterfly Inlay - Woodworking Techniques - American Woodworker

Example Dutchman:
http://www.blacksashvt.com/portfolio...ration/4242618
04-19-2013 04:28 PM
paul323
Re: Teak crack

Sadly photos help, but don't always give the full picture! The best fix really depends on a close examination of the wood and design.

I would gently pry the crack open, and then inject acetone (typically your local epoxy/fiberglass shop sells syringes). Then inject glue, clamp, and remember to drill a pilot hole before refitting.

Other options would be to reinforce the area by gluing a new piece of teak or another wood over the damaged area, as a split like this is likely to recur. In larger pieces a "butterfly" piece can be attractive; in this case, a linear piece (sometimes called a Dutchman) could be glued over the weak area. This piece should be beveled on either side, the grain aligned, and epoxied into place. This could then be drilled and provide a fresh anchor point.

Alternatively, after gluing, you could drill a slightly larger hole, fill it with thickened epoxy, and then drip and anchor into this plug. Less likely to split.

You may also want to consider putting one or two layers of fiberglass over the area. When sanded flat, it is transparent (you can varnish it) and it will provide further reinforcement. And of course, acetone wash before any epoxy/glue. It is a bit tricky though to use a small enough amount to not bee visible, but big enough to reinforce!

I'll look around for some images to show you some of these splices.

Good luck!
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:15 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.