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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard > Downside of living aboard
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Thread: Downside of living aboard Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
6 Days Ago 03:46 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

For me, a 20-pound bottle lasts me about 6 months of cooking. And, those bottles have a valve on top, which I can readily access when I need to turn the stove/oven on or off. That's why I didn't spend another $150 for an LP gas detector that had the solenoid valve in the system. I've had small bottles leak from the rubber valves after removing the regulator, so I just don't trust them, though I use them on my kettle grill. After connecting the valve on the small bottles, I usually just leave it connected and leave the bottle attached to the grill unless the weather is going to be real nasty. If that's the case, I remove the bottle, leave the regulator connected and bungee the bottle to the stern rail, which if it were to leak, the leakage would blow overboard. I must admit, though, I've only had one of those bottles leak in 50 years of using them.

All the best,

Gary
6 Days Ago 03:32 PM
hellosailor
Re: Downside of living aboard

Apparently the big non-no for boaters are the 1 or 2 pound propane bottles. There's no valve on them, just rubber "ball" that is supposed to block off the gas when nothing is screwed into the bottle. Unfortunately, I've seen those rubber balls just not make a good seal, so the propane can and will normally leak out. Even the "good" ones can go bad in storage that way. Although, some clever soul does sell gasketed brass caps that can be screwed over those, to ensure there us a positive seal.
6 Days Ago 03:02 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

yes, it's marketed as an LP gas detector, which is the primary reason I purchased it. However, when I began reading the associated literature that came with it I discovered it works for many other explosive gasses. Just a bonus I guess.

Now, there are others that have cut-off valves that automatically shut down the propane with a solenoid when explosive gasses are detected, but they are quite expensive in comparison. I always turn off the propane after cooking, just to be on the safe side. In the past 4 years, though, I've never had a propane leak. I've had batteries overcharge, spilled gasoline, but not a single propane problem.

All the best,

Gary
6 Days Ago 12:49 PM
Minnewaska
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Not only does it detect carbon monoxide, it also detects battery acid fumes, even the most minute amount. Keep in mind that carbon monoxide is highly explosive, too. here's the one I purchased Amazon.com: MTI Industries 30-442-P-WT Propane Gas Alarm - White: Automotive

The list of explosive gasses it detects is very extensive.
I couldn't readily identify the other gasses. It's marketed as an LP detector. Is this the right one, Gary? I'm interested.
6 Days Ago 12:30 PM
hellosailor
Re: Downside of living aboard

Wow, I'd never known that. I'd never heard is was explosive. Apparently in 12-75% concentrations, way above the lethal limit so maybe that's why it rarely gets mentioned. After all, if you're dead, does getting blown up really matter?

Nice to have one meter that knows more than one trick. Although there's nothing quite as infuriating as a propane sniffer that is obviously on drugs, falsing hour after hour with no good way to tell if it is or isn't pranking you. (sigh.)

Another good reason for a "Pardey-esque" boat, with even less stuff on it.(G)
6 Days Ago 12:16 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

Not only does it detect carbon monoxide, it also detects battery acid fumes, even the most minute amount. Keep in mind that carbon monoxide is highly explosive, too. here's the one I purchased
Amazon.com: MTI Industries 30-442-P-WT Propane Gas Alarm - White: Automotive Amazon.com: MTI Industries 30-442-P-WT Propane Gas Alarm - White: Automotive



The list of explosive gasses it detects is very extensive. I once spilled some gasoline while refueling, which triggered the alarm almost instantly. I couldn't smell the vapor, but the device did. On another occasion I was cleaning a paint brush in the cabin with lacquer thinner, which also triggered the alarm. Pretty amazing device, especially for the price.

Gary
6 Days Ago 12:07 PM
hellosailor
Re: Downside of living aboard

"an explosive gas detector"

I had no inkling those could also detect carbon monoxide. Which last I heard will totally prevent explosions and combustion.
6 Days Ago 10:30 AM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

Agree, that's why I purchased and installed an explosive gas detector on the boat. Best place to set up a portable genset is on a raised, stern platform, someplace where the exhaust is facing outboard of the boat.

If I had the funds, I would install an internal genset, but they are really expensive around here.

Gary
1 Week Ago 09:03 PM
hellosailor
Re: Downside of living aboard

"you can use it anyplace you desire, just as long as" you stay upwind of the monoxide and exhaust. And maybe, buy a monoxide detector just in case.
1 Week Ago 06:00 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

Sorry Tom, I thought you were describing your boat and experiences. And, yes, the AC/Heat makes a huge difference in the mold problem. And, with a generator, you can use it anyplace you desire, just as long as you have sufficient fuel for the generator. The generators I've looked at to run the heat pump have all been 2000-watts or more and consume about one gallon of gasoline every 8 hours.

All the best,

Gary
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