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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Sail Cover Material
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-16-2013 01:24 AM
windwalker
Re: Sail Cover Material

Quote:
Originally Posted by aeventyr60 View Post
If your going to DIY a new sail cover, buy some high quality UV resistant thread. You'll probably get 20 years out of the sail cover that way. I did a double layer up near the mast portion of the cover and then a second layer at the end of the boom, seems these are the high wear areas.
I second the UV resistant thread. Also, as it's unlikely you can heat cut it as previously mentioned, you could potentially use a serger on the edge to prevent it from unraveling. You'd need some heavy duty needles though.

E
08-15-2013 11:12 PM
miatapaul
Re: Sail Cover Material

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaleyF View Post
Yeah I have an industrial sewing machine I've sewed leather and fake fur with so I think it should be able to handle some heavy canvas.
Now that would be different, fake fur!

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Tapatalk 4
08-15-2013 09:41 PM
sonosail
Re: Sail Cover Material

Even if you aren't so fond of that (solid) bright blue color you see so often, (and I'm not) there is a reason for using it.
All the colors/dyes used with the acrylic fabric provide different resistance to UV degradation. That color is the best. I've made quite a number of sail covers. the blue one I have is probably 20 years old. It has been re-stitched at least 4 times.
rb
08-15-2013 09:25 PM
TejasSailer
Re: Sail Cover Material

There are several sources for making sail covers.

Here is a link to Sailrite videos:

Sail Cover Kit for 13' Boom - Made With Sunbrella Fabric

All of the following books have instructions:

The Complete Canvasworker's Guide by Jim Grant (Sailrite book)
Canvaswork & Sail Repair by Don Casey
The Big Book of Boat Canvas by Karen S. Lipe
Practical Boat Canvas Work by Lisa Carr
Canvas for Cruisers, The Complete Guide by Julie Gifford
08-15-2013 08:50 PM
smurphny
Re: Sail Cover Material

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
I concur with most of what has been said with a couple additional side notes.
-I typically have my sail covers cut with perhaps 3-4 extra inches on the skirt so that there is better ventilation for those days when you have not choice but to ride hard and put it away wet.
-I typically have a patch of the mesh used for trampolines on multihulls stitched into the inside of the sail cover at the top of the 'boot' so the headboard does not chafe through the sail cover cloth.
-I typically have a flap stitched between the zipper and the mast so the mast and zipper do not abrade against each other, and a second flap that velcro's over the zipper so that the zipper does not UV degrade. (I used to need to replace the zippers every 3 years or so.)
-The sail cover minimally needs to be 4-6 inches short of the length of your boom so you have room to stretch it tight so it sheds rain.
- I like to have a seam that runs the length of the top of the sail cover where the majority of stress occurs.

Jeff
That's how the sail cover was made for my boat. Whoever made it was a pro. All good points, especially the mesh underside of the boot to absorb abrasion. I don't have an exterior flap over the zipper. Just ripped out the degraded zipper yesterday, waiting for one to come in the mail to replace it:-)
Another handy feature is a Velcro lined heavy canvas wrap at the top of the boot so you can quickly get it set and tied around the mast. It makes it easier to secure when the wind is blowing hard and you need three hands to stop the whole thing from blowing over the side.
08-15-2013 07:27 PM
aeventyr60
Re: Sail Cover Material

If your going to DIY a new sail cover, buy some high quality UV resistant thread. You'll probably get 20 years out of the sail cover that way. I did a double layer up near the mast portion of the cover and then a second layer at the end of the boom, seems these are the high wear areas.
08-15-2013 07:12 PM
MarkSF
Re: Sail Cover Material

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormon6 View Post
The Sunbrella color that you see most commonly is called Pacific Blue.
Is is indeed, but Royal Blue Tweed has that hint of extra class Guess which one my boat came with.
08-15-2013 07:07 PM
Sailormon6
Re: Sail Cover Material

The Sunbrella color that you see most commonly is called Pacific Blue.

I used to have a C25, and made sail covers for it. I suggest you use the existing cover as a pattern for the new one, if you decide to make your own. It isn't difficult. Take the old cover apart by ripping out the stitches. From your description, it should come apart easily. Trace the outline of each piece on the new fabric. I used a piece of chalk. If you want to extend the length or modify it, it isn't difficult to freehand it a little. Instead of zippers, I used velcro to close the front edge, along the mast. I never had the velcro closure blow loose, although it did weaken it's grip when the fabric began to wear out. I also made grab rail covers for my present boat, held on with velcro, and they have been through a hurricane without coming loose.

One characteristic of Sunbrella is that it unravels along any cut edge. The pros cut it with a hot knife, to melt and seal the edge. I prevented the edges from unraveling by sewing along the edge with a zig-zag stitch. The better choice, though, would be to buy a good hot knife to do it properly.

Making a new mainsail cover is a good winter job. You can take off the mainsail for the winter and bag it, and then take the cover home to make the new one in your spare time, without having to bother with covering the mainsail while it's on the boom.
08-15-2013 06:38 PM
MarkSF
Re: Sail Cover Material

Normally the sail cover would be in the same sunbrella colour as the suncover on the jib, if yours is roller furling, that is.

If not, you are in the lucky position of choosing whatever colour you like.

My favourite is royal blue tweed.
08-15-2013 02:39 PM
Jeff_H
Re: Sail Cover Material

I concur with most of what has been said with a couple additional side notes.
-I typically have my sail covers cut with perhaps 3-4 extra inches on the skirt so that there is better ventilation for those days when you have not choice but to ride hard and put it away wet.
-I typically have a patch of the mesh used for trampolines on multihulls stitched into the inside of the sail cover at the top of the 'boot' so the headboard does not chafe through the sail cover cloth.
-I typically have a flap stitched between the zipper and the mast so the mast and zipper do not abrade against each other, and a second flap that velcro's over the zipper so that the zipper does not UV degrade. (I used to need to replace the zippers every 3 years or so.)
-The sail cover minimally needs to be 4-6 inches short of the length of your boom so you have room to stretch it tight so it sheds rain.
- I like to have a seam that runs the length of the top of the sail cover where the majority of stress occurs.

Jeff
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