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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > Easing the Mainsheet
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Thread: Easing the Mainsheet Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-28-2013 04:19 AM
SchockT
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
Jeeze guys sail twist!!!.
How about explaining how to do a letterbox take down rounding the mark with an asym?
The original post was asking
Quote:
what combination of these lines do you use when easing the main out?
It is more useful to explain the function and correct use of those lines than to just say "That's a traveler, but you don't need that, just ignore it"!

Twist is not some advanced racing technique, it is fundamental sail trim!

Three mainsail positions? Seriously? Do you only sail with 3 apparent wind angles? It's great to try and simplify things, but let's not dumb it down TOO much!
08-26-2013 04:47 PM
davidpm
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Jeeze guys sail twist!!!.
How about explaining how to do a letterbox take down rounding the mark with an asym?


He just started sailing. At least he called himself a rookie in another post.
He didn't even have his jib up.

Let me make this simple for you firstc.

You only need three mainsail positions:

1. Pull it in until the boom is over the back corner of the boat
(That's for when the wind is ahead of you)

2. Let it all the way out until the top of the sail is starting to lay against the spreaders
(That's for when the wind is behind you)

3. Let it out about half way or less
(That's for when the wind is a right angles to the boat)

The boat will sail much better with the jib up. It is very noticeable in light air.
The jib directs air over the main to make it work better.
Try to get your tell tails flowing smoothly except for a break once in a while for the top one.
Try to make your turns smooth.
Work on your commands and communication.
Do what you have to do to make the controls you do need (main-sheet, halyard etc) work smoothly.
You should be able to single handed do a starboard or port 360 and a figure eight and be rather smooth about it.

I would think being able to sail the boat and have a good feel and control is more important than the advanced control features. It least that is my opinion.

Keep the traveler centered you don't need it until you have the basics mastered. Lot's of boats don't even have them.

That's all you need to know for now.
Practice sailing in circles and figure eights.

All the advice the guys are telling you is good advise but you have to develop a feel before you will benefit from adjusting the traveler, boom Vang, Cunningham, halyard tension, leech tension, shroud tension etc.

If you are way past the above and I misread your experience please ignore this post and ask the racers about all the fine tuning controls.
08-26-2013 02:25 PM
Alex W
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Cool chart, that makes me want to figure out the Dellenbaugh angle for my Pearson to see how it compares.

My guess is that it will be on the more tender end of the scale. Ballast, beam, and displacement are somewhere in between the 29 Mk1 and 29 Mk2, but has a longer LWL (similar LOA).
08-26-2013 02:01 PM
PaulinVictoria
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

I'm registered on there, haven't posted much but I do use the cncphotoalbum list. Your MkIII is one of the more tender boats C&C produced, fast in light air though. This is quite an interesting chart if you've never seen it before, http://cncphotoalbum.com/technical/stability.htm shows the relative stability of their various models. C&C never referred to the various marks in the way we know them, they were the MkI, MkI tall (Mk II to us), MkII (which covered the Mk III and Mk IV) and then the New 27 (Mk V).
08-26-2013 09:56 AM
FirstCandC
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Paul, after this weekend, I can definitely vouch for the MkIII being tender! Do you post on the C&C Association site?

ShockT, I figured it out. There are two blocks (one above the other) on each end of the traveler, with a cam cleat above each pair. There is also a cam cleat back near the wheel. I think the Previous-Previous Owner (who raced the boat) had it set up so you could use the forward cam cleat if you had crew in the cockpit to pull it upwards. When singlehanding, I think he either stood in front of the wheel, or just ommitted this cleat and ran straight from the lower block back to the rear cam cleat. Smart. Wish I could pick his brain..
08-24-2013 03:27 PM
PaulinVictoria
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Shame you aren't a bit closer, you could come take a look at my C&C27 to see how she's rigged - I've had to re-do quite a bit of it since I got her, I think the PO/broker just dumped lines somewhere to make it look boaty
FYI, with regards to the reefing lines, I've found mine sails fine in 15-20kts with a full main and about a 110% genoa, with the 150 up it's a little too hairy for single-handing, but your MkIII is going to be a little more tender than mine so you might want to get that first reef point rigged if you think you might be out in a breeze like that. You'll also find she sails much better with both sails out, otherwise you will have noticed that you have to keep a lot of pressure on the helm to stop her rounding into wind.
08-23-2013 07:34 PM
SchockT
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstCandC View Post
There are also cam cleats that don't have turning blocks in the cockpit, leading the lines up and aft. This causes a lot of chafing on the lines, as you can imagine! I love this boat, though. Going to just work on a little bit at a time.
Cleats for which lines, where? Don't assume the PO didn't know what he was doing, there might be a good reason for their location.

With regards to trimming the main, I have found that leech telltales are the most useful. Put a telltail on the trailing edge of each of the top 3 batten pockets. If the telltales are streaming back then you have good flow. If they are hiding on the leeward side,, you are over trimmed. If the top telltale is hiding you have too much leech tension(not enough twist). Ideally when sailing upwind all 3 telltales should be streaming with the top one flicking to leeward occasionally.

A pack of telltales is the cheapest, most useful tuning tool you will ever find!
08-23-2013 02:27 PM
FirstCandC
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

There are also cam cleats that don't have turning blocks in the cockpit, leading the lines up and aft. This causes a lot of chafing on the lines, as you can imagine! I love this boat, though. Going to just work on a little bit at a time.
08-23-2013 01:21 PM
Sailormon6
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

That cleat on the boom appears to be poorly placed. It appears to be situated about where a turning block should be located for the second reef. I would relocate it on the boom near the mast. That cleat looks like it's for your outhaul. I would suggest you enlist someone with some experience to help you re-position that cleat, and to re-rig your reef lines and hardware. C&Cs are good boats, but it looks like a previous owner has tinkered with the rigging hardware. It shouldn't cost much to make it right, but you could probably use some help to position the hardware correctly.
08-23-2013 12:52 PM
FirstCandC
Re: Easing the Mainsheet

Thanks. I thought I was overtrimmed, too. Going to have to start using the traveler more. The jib was rolled up because I had my hands full with the dog (seriously full!), and I am also trying to get more efficient with the main before I start running two sails. Hopefully going to run both the main and jib this Sunday.
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