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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Destinations > Chesapeake / Central US east coast > Chesapeake Bay > Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-14-2013 10:12 AM
aa3jy
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Found this abstract while searching for 3D mapping of under water caves..

Inter Research*»*MEPS*»*v486*»*p23-35

Chlorophyll caught my eye
09-05-2013 04:29 PM
aa3jy
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Just spent 2 days on the Little Choptank, what a difference in water conditions.. Less murky could see a couple of feet in viz. And believe this ..no sea nettles. So checked the boats haul...much cleaner!
08-25-2013 10:50 AM
boz86
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_machine View Post
Why are the commercial Fishermen and crabbers always seem to be trying to put themselves out of business? While it would hurt for severe restrictions to be in place for a couple of years, the rebound in stocks should make up for that
It's a classic "Tragedy of the Commons" situation. That and the tendency for most to look at the short view. And in all fairness, if their entire livelihood, capital, etc are tied up in the fishing and crabbing industry they're between a rock and a hard place. Can they earn enough off the water to cover living expenses and holding costs for those couple of years?

"The tragedy of the commons is a dilemma arising from the situation in which multiple individuals, acting independently and rationally consulting their own self-interest, will ultimately deplete a shared limited resource even when it is clear that it is not in anyone's long-term interest for this to happen. This dilemma was first described in an influential article titled "The Tragedy of the Commons," written by Garrett Hardin and first published in the journal Science in 1968.[1]"

further down:

"Central to Hardin's article is an example (first sketched in an 1833 pamphlet by William Forster Lloyd) of a hypothetical and simplified situation based on medieval land tenure in Europe, of herders sharing a common parcel of land, on which they are each entitled to let their cows graze. In Hardin's example, it is in each herder's interest to put the next (and succeeding) cows he acquires onto the land, even if the quality of the common is temporarily or permanently damaged for all as a result, through over grazing. The herder receives all of the benefits from an additional cow, while the damage to the common is shared by the entire group. If all herders make this individually rational economic decision, the common will be depleted or even destroyed to the detriment of all."

https://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/t...e_commons.html
08-24-2013 09:51 AM
mad_machine
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Blue crabs spawn near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, mainly in a vast area near Cape Charles, VA, a location where until recent years the sponged females were targeted by commercial crab draggers and sold to the picking market. The eggs were merely ripped off the crab and tossed in the trash at the picking houses, while the meat was Pasteurized and canned. Because the crabs were dragged from beneath the bottom in areas consisting of sandy mud, the meat was frequently contaminated with grit from the sand.

Crabs grow very rapidly after hatching. Much faster than anyone can imagine. The females only live about a year and a few months, while the males often live two years. The females migrate down the bay beginning in early September, and for years many of the Crisfield commercial fleets targeted them for local picking houses. The harvest was beyond a doubt one of the things that led to the species incredible decline, but legislation to protect blue crabs, like most natural resource legislation, became a political football, prompting a huge number of meaningless, action-delaying studies that lasted more than two decades. Consequently, the stocks nearly collapsed before minor harvest restrictions were put in place, and as usual, the restrictions mainly targeted what is referred to as "Chicken Neckers", recreation crabbers using collapsible crab traps and handlines baited with chicken necks. DNR made the ridiculous claim that recreational crabbers harvest as many, if not more crabs, than the commercial crabbers.
Why are the commercial Fishermen and crabbers always seem to be trying to put themselves out of business? While it would hurt for severe restrictions to be in place for a couple of years, the rebound in stocks should make up for that
08-23-2013 04:31 PM
T37Chef
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
We've had no problem with our painted areas and this is the third season for Ultima 60

Now the prop and shaft are a different story
Same here except for some growth at the waterline, although my prop is not that bad, but the shaft is coated...as of three weeks ago with little use since then
08-23-2013 03:56 PM
WouldaShoulda
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

I am never, NEVER getting into the water ever again!!
08-22-2013 05:13 PM
aa3jy
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Sorry guys and gals, but not blue crab larvae - wrong time of year, wrong place, wrong everything. The more likely scenario is they are grass shrimp larvae, which are quite prevalent in the middle and lower bay, and frequently inhabit the shallows and reside among the marina pilings.

Blue crabs spawn near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, mainly in a vast area near Cape Charles, VA, a location where until recent years the sponged females were targeted by commercial crab draggers and sold to the picking market. The eggs were merely ripped off the crab and tossed in the trash at the picking houses, while the meat was Pasteurized and canned. Because the crabs were dragged from beneath the bottom in areas consisting of sandy mud, the meat was frequently contaminated with grit from the sand.

Crabs grow very rapidly after hatching. Much faster than anyone can imagine. The females only live about a year and a few months, while the males often live two years. The females migrate down the bay beginning in early September, and for years many of the Crisfield commercial fleets targeted them for local picking houses. The harvest was beyond a doubt one of the things that led to the species incredible decline, but legislation to protect blue crabs, like most natural resource legislation, became a political football, prompting a huge number of meaningless, action-delaying studies that lasted more than two decades. Consequently, the stocks nearly collapsed before minor harvest restrictions were put in place, and as usual, the restrictions mainly targeted what is referred to as "Chicken Neckers", recreation crabbers using collapsible crab traps and handlines baited with chicken necks. DNR made the ridiculous claim that recreational crabbers harvest as many, if not more crabs, than the commercial crabbers.

Back to the critters. There are lots of neat things swimming, squirming and crawling around on the Chesapeake's hard and semi-hard substrate, some of which you can readily see with the naked eye, but there's lots of more that you can only visualize with the aid of a large magnifying glass or microscope. The vast majority of these critters are various forms of zoo-planktons, which will really get your undivided attention.



Cheers,

Gary
..guess you'll have to dive on your own boat's bottom sometime and make a informed observation... 'cause the images you attached are not what I saw first hand as well as picked off my body..
08-22-2013 04:27 PM
travlineasy
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Sorry guys and gals, but not blue crab larvae - wrong time of year, wrong place, wrong everything. The more likely scenario is they are grass shrimp larvae, which are quite prevalent in the middle and lower bay, and frequently inhabit the shallows and reside among the marina pilings.

Blue crabs spawn near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, mainly in a vast area near Cape Charles, VA, a location where until recent years the sponged females were targeted by commercial crab draggers and sold to the picking market. The eggs were merely ripped off the crab and tossed in the trash at the picking houses, while the meat was Pasteurized and canned. Because the crabs were dragged from beneath the bottom in areas consisting of sandy mud, the meat was frequently contaminated with grit from the sand.

Crabs grow very rapidly after hatching. Much faster than anyone can imagine. The females only live about a year and a few months, while the males often live two years. The females migrate down the bay beginning in early September, and for years many of the Crisfield commercial fleets targeted them for local picking houses. The harvest was beyond a doubt one of the things that led to the species incredible decline, but legislation to protect blue crabs, like most natural resource legislation, became a political football, prompting a huge number of meaningless, action-delaying studies that lasted more than two decades. Consequently, the stocks nearly collapsed before minor harvest restrictions were put in place, and as usual, the restrictions mainly targeted what is referred to as "Chicken Neckers", recreation crabbers using collapsible crab traps and handlines baited with chicken necks. DNR made the ridiculous claim that recreational crabbers harvest as many, if not more crabs, than the commercial crabbers.

Back to the critters. There are lots of neat things swimming, squirming and crawling around on the Chesapeake's hard and semi-hard substrate, some of which you can readily see with the naked eye, but there's lots of more that you can only visualize with the aid of a large magnifying glass or microscope. The vast majority of these critters are various forms of zoo-planktons, which will really get your undivided attention.



Cheers,

Gary
08-22-2013 09:19 AM
BubbleheadMd
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

My Micron Extra is still keeping them off of the hull. Just some slime.
As Dave says, my running gear was heavily fouled, and I lost over 1 knot of boat speed.

I used Petit Zinc spray on the running gear two YEARS ago, so I wasn't at all surprised to have to dive and scrape all the running gear.
08-21-2013 11:59 PM
chef2sail
Re: Very Murky Upper Chesapeake Bay and Tributaries

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquina View Post
As far as I can tell, bottom paint was a total waste of money for everyone. The barnacles seem to LIKE it this year.
We've had no problem with our painted areas and this is the third season for Ultima 60

Now the prop and shaft are a different story
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