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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > small boat for beginner
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-17-2007 12:55 PM
scurvy I would second the Catalina 22' (great little beginner boat!) There are a ton out there. Check out the Cal 20, Bristol 24', Cape Dory 22', 25 and even the little typhoon (19'). Decide what your budget is, check the local newspapers, www.boats.com, www.yachtworld.com, and others with the requirements and price range you are looking for and go for it. Lots of great "older" boats out there that are holding up well and would give you the oportunity to cut your teeth in sailing for little down. I would spend as little as possible as was mentioned above...there are docks to slam into, rocks to find, sand to go aground on...not discouraging you, but we have all been there! Just remember that the purchase of the boat is only the beginning, there are repairs, maintenance, upgrades, brightwork, dockage, hauling and storage fees...so I would try to keep the initial costs low...then you can spend the rest of your time and money on the water and not in some yard with a paintbrush in one hand and sandpaper in the other! Welcome aboard and good luck with your search.
02-05-2007 04:36 PM
greggus Some of the posters have mentioned Courageous and The saling Center. Another is: http://www.bostonharborsailing.com/
Any one of these would be a wise choice if your not sure what you want to do. The saling club near Rowes Wharf would allow you to sail a variety of boats. This would help you understand the key characteristics that you seek. I was a member there for a number of years in the early 90's and now have my own boat in the Shipyard at Charlestown. The club is a no hassle relatively low cost access to boats that would allow you great access to the surrounding waters. While I was there I pretty much sailed whenever I wanted, sometimes 6 days a week.
02-05-2007 04:14 PM
Denr one word:

MacGregor
02-05-2007 03:59 PM
resdog Look at Catalina 22. They are fun little boats and there are a ton of them around at decent prices and you can overnight if you are on close terms with your sailing partner.
02-04-2007 03:44 PM
tonic There's not one perfect boat. Make a list of what is important to you. Price number one, that will limit it down or up. Also do you want a kicker (outboard engine) or a small desiel, or none at all. How much maintanance do what to do, or are willing to pay for. The main thing is what body of water you are to sail, on if its tidal you probably want to have some sort of propulsion or some where to mount it. Lake you can make due with out. Maybe you want to have an option to trailer it take that into acount. The main thing is enjoy it and do it safe. For me it was a Force 5 than a Hunter 25.5 with a Yanmar 1 GM 10 desiel in it and now it's a Beneteau 32. Point is what's right for me may not be right for you so make a list and good luck. PEACE and happy sailing.
01-30-2007 01:25 AM
Sailormann Get something light - something that CAN tip over, so that you can learn how NOT TO tip over. SIRENS are great for this. DS 16's, WEST WIGHT POTTERS, anything that is not too heavy.
01-29-2007 06:30 PM
soul searcher Com-pacs are fun little keel boats theres one on Ebay for sale we had a 16 and had a ball on it. would have liked to had this one though!!
http://http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=015&category=63729&viewitem=&item=250076112876&rd=1
01-29-2007 09:54 AM
equitiman Also, if you learned to sail at the club on the Charles by Storrow Drive then Courageous (or any of the other clubs based on the harbor) are the perfect step up from sailing on the river.

Good luck!
Bob
01-29-2007 09:50 AM
equitiman If you are going to be sailing in Boston Harbor then you should look into Courageous Sailing Center. They are a non-profit sailing organization in Charlestown that has a fairly large fleet of boats, including 20 or so Rhodes 19 and a few larger boats. I first learned to sail with them and paid something like $350 for 12 hours of lessons and then unlimited use of their boats for me and my friends for the entire summer (and there are always boats available as long as you reserve the day before). It was the best deal ever...plus the Rhodes 19 are perfect boats for daysailing in the harbor and if you start early in the morning you can make it out to the harbor islands and anchor, swim, and do whatever on the beaches and make it back to the dock before sunset. Plus, to get your overnight kicks they organize a few overnight trips out the islands each summer. If I still lived in Boston I wouldn't buy a boat I would just sail through Courageous...althought I definitely understand the satisfaction of owning your own boat so I don't want to discourage you...just let you know of other options.
01-29-2007 09:16 AM
CDRA Look around your local marinas for the most common boats in the 22 to 27 ft range. Then look for one that is maybe 20 years old for sale, that does not need much work beyond cleaning and and bottom paint, with a full complement of sails.
Sail for a year or two, run aground a few times, ram your slip, and make as many mistakes you feel comfortable with, then move up to the boat you really want.
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