SailNet Community - Reply to Topic
Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.

Thread: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation. Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


  Topic Review (Newest First)
1 Week Ago 10:22 PM
newt
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

Now that digital radars have come down in price, and even old analog radars are even less, I am going to go out on a limb and say perhaps you shouldn't be out in a fog nearshore without radar and AIS. A lot of the old sailors just stayed offshore or waited to sail until the fog was reasonable. After scraping a unmarked military temporary buoy last year (plastic mind you) my wife has really asked me to not sail at night without the radar on, and I don't think she is unreasonable. And that was a clear and dark night. There are a lot of foul objects out there, near to the shore (some of them) that you can hit.
It's not really a defeat of my manhood to use what is available to us...
1 Week Ago 11:26 PM
hpeer
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj View Post
This isn't a bad thing - particularly in waters like the ICW, where the buoy direction often changes in inlet areas - right where things can be most confusing. I often find myself scrambling to double check I understand when/where these changes are happening. Not a bad thing to set up a simple reminder in these areas that eases the mind in a glance.

Entrances into bays, marinas and side waterways are other areas where buoys can change direction from the main waterway.

Mark
Yeah, I can see that. Yet I don't think that is what this was about. Something in the way she presented it said it was more fundamental.

Doesn't matter, if it works for you use it. Success at any cost, they were sailing and happy. She loved her husband and lost him to cancer. I felt very sorry for both of them.
1 Week Ago 01:42 PM
hellosailor
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

I think I just made an "AUGH!" that Snoopy would have been proud of, when he told me that. But there are so many words that simply have no equivalent in "other" languages, that you're bound to hit them sometime anyway. When you're with people who are multilingual, it isn't unusual to throw in words or terms in "the other" language when they fit the bill better than a "native" word would.

Of course then you have us Colonials, where having a vocabulary in even the one native tongue can be rare.(G)
1 Week Ago 01:34 PM
outbound
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

What screwed the bride up was going back and forth between A and B. Told her ignore the colors just attend to the shapes. When in doubt ignore the aids just attend what the depth reads and charted depths. All good after that.
1 Week Ago 11:10 AM
colemj
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
I was going over the boat with her the day before and she brings out a red and a green bean bag and puts them on the helm station. I ask what they were for? Here husband couldn't keep the bouys straight, so she would set the bags up for him so he could navigate.
This isn't a bad thing - particularly in waters like the ICW, where the buoy direction often changes in inlet areas - right where things can be most confusing. I often find myself scrambling to double check I understand when/where these changes are happening. Not a bad thing to set up a simple reminder in these areas that eases the mind in a glance.

Entrances into bays, marinas and side waterways are other areas where buoys can change direction from the main waterway.

Mark
1 Week Ago 11:02 AM
pdqaltair
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

"I was never trained on charts."

"There is no formal class...."

I wouldn't have the brass to post that.
1 Week Ago 09:29 AM
hpeer
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

That's funny. My Wife is German and we have the same issue. Some words that she learned here she doesn't know in German.
1 Week Ago 06:43 PM
hellosailor
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

"I have a friend who can't tell right from left."
I have a friend who can't either. When I first gave her road directions in a car, she kept making wrong turns. So I just quietly made sure to say "THAT WAY" and point with my arm. Problem solved.
Another friend was from Argentina and spoke Spanish, along with excellent English. But we had port?starboard? confusion on the boat, so I figured, I'll just learn how to say those in Spanish. Next week I proudly said "bababoard" instead of starboard, and he looks up at me and says "What?". I said, isn't that Spanish for starboard? He said "I wouldn't know, I learned to sail here in America, in English.

What can you do...assume nothing. Sailing should teach us that much, at least.
1 Week Ago 05:37 PM
hpeer
Re: The danger of GPS as the sole means of navigation.

Ive a few stories to tell.

Took a fellow sailing, long trip, said he wanted to learn. On board the first thing I did was give him Calders nav book. He flips through it and pitches it aside, never to open again. He damn near out us on the rocks twice because he couldn't read a chart. Not the slightest interest. Very stressful.

I have a friend who can't tell right from left. My Wife, if stressed, will have a similar problem. I delivered a small cat, day job, for a lady whose Husband died. I was going over the boat with her the day before and she brings out a red and a green bean bag and puts them on the helm station. I ask what they were for? Here husband couldn't keep the bouys straight, so she would set the bags up for him so he could navigate.

Then there is this....in pea soup fog.

1 Week Ago 12:17 PM
BarryL
reporting position

Hey,

I understand why the question is asked, and the location should be known and reported. However, I find it much more useful to provide the location by referring to a known point, like "I am approximately 1 mile north of Stratford Shoal light" instead of "42 degrees 17.34 minutes north, 78 degrees 55.43 minutes west." I KNOW where stratford shoal light is, and I know if I am close enough to provide assistance if required. If I don't know where the spot is, I know I am NOT close enough. It's much more difficult to know where I am by lat / lon. I need to write it down and then check. Really, you should both.

Barry


Quote:
Originally Posted by newt View Post
I listen on the VHF and one of coastie's first questions in a disaster in their lat and long, and many skippers don't have a clue.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome