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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > The economics of sailing around the world
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Thread: The economics of sailing around the world Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-16-2013 10:55 AM
TJC45
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Sailing around the world at age 18 didn't occur to some of us because, at the time, we were fighting a war with Vietnam. Sailing around the world wasn't on the menu of draft deferments. We went to school and when our number came up, we went to war. of course, some of us volunteered.

Whether it's sailing around the world or hiking the AT, there are trade offs in life to be made. I don't look at my kids and think, I wish I did something else with my life. I wouldn't trade a day with them for anything. I'm sure that speaks for everyone here. So, we are left with the old fashioned way of getting it done - earn our way there. For some of us that will work, some it won't, and for most, they could care less. Sailing around the world, or for that matter, further than the horizon, just not on the bucket list.
09-16-2013 10:19 AM
LakeMi
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

If I didn't have kids I think that it would be one hell of a good way to spend a few years. I was to wound up in trying to get a good job and buying a house that things like this never crossed my mind. Wish they had. I might of had some nice stories to tell. No one wants to here about buying new living room furniture and painting.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
09-16-2013 10:09 AM
Coquina
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Best way is to be young and think nothing of showing up in a foreign country with $400 to your name and not mind working under-the-table jobs to get more money. I am sadly too old for that kind of adventure now and the danger level would be way too high - my wife would f-n kill me
09-16-2013 09:21 AM
TJC45
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post


I dont really agree with the thought that a circumnavigating boat needs to be hugely different from other crruising boats... unless we are talking about weekend sailers that pop up and down the Chesapeake. The one error I think people who set out to do a tropical circumnavigation do is over think (or read too many forums) and buy a too old, and too solid, too traditional, too full keel, too poorly ventilated, too 'sea kindly' old heap of old style crap just because they think its a blue water boat.


One horror story in the making is these threads where they say you can live circumnavigating for 3 years on $10,000. I'm sorry but you can't. I can't. No one can.



I do believe in "Go Now"; I do believe it can be done on a tight budget. I do believe we can die tomorrow so we must make use of today. There is a whole world to see and seeing it will educate us more and better than anything else in the world.
I do NOT believe horror stories. I dont believe in floating containers. One doesn't need 1 inch think fiberglass. They didnt make them better in the old days. We make them better now.

But mostly I believe if people did not read the horror stories more people would be willing to go further than the Bahamas from the USA; go further from the Med from Europe; go further than the Whitsundays from Australia.

The world is our oyster and I hate people stealing clichés!



Mark
Ironically one of the more popular boats used for popping up and down the Chesapeake are Beneteaus.

But even those unsuitable( in your opinion) Chesapeake cruisin Benes can get pricey. Northward of 150k once you get above the mid 30 foot versions. Geez even their new 21 footer is closing in on 100k once it's all optioned up. And the Beneteaus are built at about the same quality and price point as the other popular Chessie cruisers, Catalina and Hunter.

So, if an unsuitable Chesapeake Bay cruiser is going to set someone back at least six figures to buy, how much more would a suitable boat cost? How does that work with a "tight budget?"


AS for go now? Go now sounds great! That works for trust fund babies and family scions. Maybe a few business guys who decide to give it up early. All good for these folks. Many of these types are my clients. They have no need to look at the price tag of anything they buy or anything they do. And, if they decide to take a 5 year or longer time out to sail around the world their life of financial independence will be waiting for them when they return. I wish them nothing but the best. That's not how it goes for the average person of average financial means. Things would be not so good after blowing the life's savings on a round the world cruise.

Of course there is pan handling your way around the world for those who just want to go without money and without a plan
09-16-2013 03:44 AM
Minnewaska
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I plan to keep the day job a bit longer and see the world, at least some of it, with a functioning ice maker.
09-15-2013 11:39 PM
aeventyr60
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKscooter View Post
Damn shame people are gonna miss out on the world because their icemaker broke down......oh well........
Who needs apps or ice makers when you can have this:

"The weekends here have been filled with the sounds of Marquesan drums, the sight of Polynesians dancing, and the taste of Hinano beer."
09-15-2013 09:23 PM
AKscooter
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Damn shame people are gonna miss out on the world because their icemaker broke down......oh well........
09-15-2013 07:14 PM
aeventyr60
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

A "cheap" boat sailing to the Marquesas form "latitude 38"

Ichiban — Columbia 34 Mk II
Justin Jenkins and Anna Wiley
Big Cruise on a Small Budget
(San Diego)

I've never felt such a great sense of accomplishment as after making the 32-day, 3,000-mile passage from San Diego to Controller Bay, Nuku Hiva, with my girlfriend Anna Wiley. It was both the scariest thing I've ever done and the most rewarding. It feels as though we've ascended to the top of the highest nautical mountain.

Anna and I are not like most cruisers. We're both just 30 years old and don't have much money. But we didn't see much of a future for ourselves in the United States right now, so we decided to buy the best boat we could with our limited funds and take off.

The boat turned out to be a surprisingly spacious Columbia 34 Mk II, which we got for just $2,000. The small outboard wasn't going to cut it as an auxiliary in the South Pacific, so I bought and installed a rebuilt Atomic 4. I know a gas engine isn't ideal for cruising, but it was what we could afford. Ichiban also needed sails, so I bought a used main and a used jib for $100 each. Naturally the boat needed lots of other work, which took up most of my time for the last year.

Our original plan was to start by cruising Mexico, but we weren't ready to leave in time for the season. So when we didn't leave San Diego until May 11, our destination became the Marquesas in the South Pacific rather than Mexico. After all the repairs and provisioning, our cruising kitty was down to just $400. But it was time to walk the walk, so we left.

Other than getting hit by 30 knots of wind near Guadalupe Island, and getting thrashed in the doldrums, our crossing was surprisingly uneventful. We had a solid 15 knots on the quarter until we hit the doldrums at about 10°N. It was pretty squally in the ITCZ, with wind from five to 30 knots, and strong currents. We never knew which way the wind or current would come from, and it was like being in a washing machine. It took us six days to get down to 4°N, which is where we finally escaped the ITCZ.

The doldrums was the most nerve-wracking part of the trip. One night the wind died and the current pushed us 20 miles back. That wasn't fun. But then the southeast trades filled in and carried us to Nuku Hiva's Controller Bay at a steady five knots.

Ichiban handled very well during the long crossing and, thank God, nothing broke. We didn't have a spinnaker pole, so we recently made one out of bamboo.

As soon as we arrived, we began to meet lots of cruisers. They've been wonderful about sharing their knowledge of sailing and cruising. What a great bunch of people! Igor and Louise, our new cruising friends from Australia, just had their first baby pop out last night. We're about to go to the local hospital to see what she looks like.

Starting out with such a small cruising kitty, we were lucky to find some jobs — repairing sails and cleaning boats — almost right away. As a result, we were able to nearly double the size of our kitty. We've also been playing a lot of music, and have received quite a bit of free fruit from our gracious listeners.

The weekends here have been filled with the sounds of Marquesan drums, the sight of Polynesians dancing, and the taste of Hinano beer.

We're all checked in with the Gendarmerie, which has taken a load off our minds. But as we'd like to spend more time exploring French Polynesia, we're hoping to get a one-year extension to our visas.

Anna and I are so glad that we went cruising. What a life it is! We're hoping to encourage other young folks with not so much money to join us in this adventurous lifestyle.

— justin 07/31/2013
09-13-2013 10:14 PM
HaleyF
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Haley is the freelance work stuff you do online? That is possible but it is hard and often illegal to work in most countries. There are times when you can work while you wait for the next cruising season, eg in NZ or Oz while the cyclone season happens.
Yeah I work in app/web design. Always a steady stream of available freelance and contract work. I'm actually a Canadian citizen so setting up in NZ/Australia as well as most EU countries for a couple months is doable for me.
09-13-2013 08:57 PM
killarney_sailor
Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaleyF View Post
This thread is great. My man and I started the budgeting process for a multi-year trip about 6 months ago. Right now our goal for the end of next year is 70k in the bank. At that point we'll start looking at boats and probably spend the following year both saving and outfitting while still working. My current "expectation" (and I use that word extremely loosely haha) of the cost of the boat is around 50k for something in the 35-40 ft range, older, but still tough. The plan in the meantime is to foster some of our side projects into passive sources of income while we're gone, and if all else fails, make some stops and do some freelance work en route.

I am 28 and he is 31 and we're lucky enough to have well paying jobs and a rent controlled apartment in New York City.
Haley is the freelance work stuff you do online? That is possible but it is hard and often illegal to work in most countries. There are times when you can work while you wait for the next cruising season, eg in NZ or Oz while the cyclone season happens.
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