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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-02-2016 02:35 PM
midwesterner
Quote:
Originally Posted by overbored View Post
...
They didn't let women on their boats. Fore yee might have mighty bad luck there at sea.
The Mayflower had women aboard in 1620.
09-02-2016 02:17 PM
TQA
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Lynn and Larry Pardey lived aboard for many years and circumnavigated while using a bucket.

In fact although I have read their books I can't remember if they ever fitted a conventional marine toilet.
09-02-2016 02:14 PM
alctel
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Dunno, but I fit three months supply of bricks into a laptop bag, if that gives you an idea of space. No bugs either!

Peat moss is pretty irreplaceable and is fast dwindling so if you can avoid using it, do.
09-02-2016 12:48 PM
RichH
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Quote:
Originally Posted by alctel View Post
Use coconut coir. Way more environmentally friendly and the bricks are compressed and take up very little room
....and how many kapok filled life preservers do you estimate would one need to store on deck to enable a more 'environmentally friendly' travel for about 6-7 months through the tropics?
09-02-2016 12:46 PM
capta
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Quote:
Originally Posted by alctel View Post
the solids compartment when the trapdoor is closed.
Do you check the trap door for trap door spiders occasionally? lol
09-02-2016 12:34 PM
Capt Len
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Really green sailors only need a rinsing bucket and a drying rack and while anchored can recycle the coir.
09-02-2016 12:20 PM
alctel
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
Obviously you are not a sailor who must use a head in anything but the marina, anchorage or flat water.
I'd like to see you try to keep the liquids separate from the solids at sea, beating or close reaching in 15 to 25 knots on a 10 day passage to the islands from the right coast.
There's a very, very good reason why only a few have composting toilets on their boats, and those are more often than not boats with one marine toilet for when they are actually underway and a composting one when they are not. I'd like nothing better than thumbing my nose at the CG when they come a-checking, but no way I'm going to have one of those things in my boat.
I've got one and have no problem with them mixing, even in heavy shitty conditions. The design of the toilet prevents urine sloshing up in the solids compartment when the trapdoor is closed.

I love it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Sure you could, you just have to figure out where to store all those bales of peat moss? .... deck cargo covered with Sunbrella 'cozies'?
The plastic wrapping of shredded 'brownish' agricultural product ... would make you quite 'popular' with the DEA in the Miami area. ;-)
Use coconut coir. Way more environmentally friendly and the bricks are compressed and take up very little room
09-02-2016 02:57 AM
RichH
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
............... composting toilets ............., but no way I'm going to have one of those things in my boat.
Sure you could, you just have to figure out where to store all those bales of peat moss? .... deck cargo covered with Sunbrella 'cozies'?
The plastic wrapping of shredded 'brownish' agricultural product ... would make you quite 'popular' with the DEA in the Miami area. ;-)
09-02-2016 01:19 AM
capta
Re: Historical question: toilet on small yacht?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffl@nisuscorp.com View Post
Historically anything goes (went) but nowadays, it is nearly as easy. Pee over the side, or use a urine separator. The #1 goes over the side and the #2 goes in the composting head (bucket) with sawdust, cat litter etc. to dry and for later disposal and composting. Simple, cheap, clean and green. Buy a system for $750 or build your own easily for $50.
Obviously you are not a sailor who must use a head in anything but the marina, anchorage or flat water.
I'd like to see you try to keep the liquids separate from the solids at sea, beating or close reaching in 15 to 25 knots on a 10 day passage to the islands from the right coast.
There's a very, very good reason why only a few have composting toilets on their boats, and those are more often than not boats with one marine toilet for when they are actually underway and a composting one when they are not. I'd like nothing better than thumbing my nose at the CG when they come a-checking, but no way I'm going to have one of those things in my boat.
09-02-2016 12:39 AM
jeffl@nisuscorp.com Historically anything goes (went) but nowadays, it is nearly as easy. Pee over the side, or use a urine separator. The #1 goes over the side and the #2 goes in the composting head (bucket) with sawdust, cat litter etc. to dry and for later disposal and composting. Simple, cheap, clean and green. Buy a system for $750 or build your own easily for $50.
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