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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > This curious nautical language
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-23-2013 02:49 AM
downeast450
Re: This curious nautical language

"Head", still seems to work. As a term at least. Without a bowsprit and a "head rope" it isn't the same place anymore.

Down
09-22-2013 09:09 PM
Cap-Couillon
Re: This curious nautical language

No use in arguing with someone citing "USN" authority, Hell, I was in the navy for a year before I figured out a bulkhead wasn't an butter-bar (aka ensign, O-1)
09-22-2013 07:03 PM
Classic30
Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cap-Couillon View Post
Handy-Billy: A loose block and tackle used to provide extra lifting or pulling power. Derivation: from Handy Billy (an extra set of hands). See also, Dog's Body
Well, perhaps one of you guys should get the Wikipedia entry altered:

09-20-2013 08:16 AM
Cap-Couillon
Re: This curious nautical language

Handy-Billy: A loose block and tackle used to provide extra lifting or pulling power. Derivation: from Handy Billy (an extra set of hands). See also, Dog's Body
09-20-2013 05:10 AM
knuterikt
Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic30 View Post
Repeat after me: "Serve and parcel with the lay, turn and serve the other way." A laborious and messy job unless you happen to really like the smell of Stockholm Tar.
Whats wrong with Stockholm tar
Almost 30 years since I put parcel and serving on a wire..
Here is picture from a series a found on the net Traditional Rigging 101 - Serving wire rope - a set on Flickr

Parceling with the lay of the wire


Serving in the opposite direction of the lay / parceling
09-20-2013 03:05 AM
Classic30
Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
The gammon is the the bracket that bolts or lashes the bowsprit to the stem head and prevents it from lifting (pull of fore stays) Sailors sitting in the bows may have a chat and so are having a gam.
IIRC, the word "gammon" also describes the rope lashing that keeps the topmasts in place and "gammoning" the job of actually doing it... but either way, in the bows or up the mast, in a decent swell it sounds like hard work to me!

"Snugging the snotter.." - I like that.

Repeat after me: "Serve and parcel with the lay, turn and serve the other way." A laborious and messy job unless you happen to really like the smell of Stockholm Tar.
09-20-2013 02:00 AM
gamayun
Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic30 View Post
Lot's of lines run to the spinnaker pole. Technically, you're thinking of the brace aren't you??

Certainly whatever it is you're meaning by "blow the guy" isn't in any old-time nautical language list I've ever seen - it doesn't even sound nautical..
It's in Wikipedia so it must be a somewhat common nautical term, right?

"Retrieving the spinnaker is a multi-step process, and the take-down depends on wind position. First, the windward corner is detached from the spinnaker pole and the guy is released. This step is referred to as blowing the guy. This allows the spinnaker to collapse into the shadow of the mainsail, where the foot is gathered by a crew member. The halyard is then lowered..."

It was also in a 1985 article in Sailing World magazine: http://www.sailingworld.com/sites/al...-takedowns.pdf.
09-20-2013 01:34 AM
Capt Len
Re: This curious nautical language

The gammon is the the bracket that bolts or lashes the bowsprit to the stem head and prevents it from lifting (pull of fore stays) Sailors sitting in the bows may have a chat and so are having a gam. A four masted vessel has its jigger aft of the mizzen. A handy billy ,, a pair of small blocks, usually one has a hook but the other has a short line to lash to larger line or shroud with a rolling hitch. I use one to set up my lanyards and deadeyes.Swigging up is the last bit of bouse and tail (before haul yard winches) Sort of like snugging the snotter. Now if you knew what's a snotter!! Would it help to know it goes though the beehole.? Even a little nipper knows that.
09-20-2013 01:06 AM
Classic30
Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by gamayun View Post
The guy is the line that runs to the spinnaker pole. What were ya'll thinking it was?!?
Lot's of lines run to the spinnaker pole. Technically, you're thinking of the brace aren't you??

Certainly whatever it is you're meaning by "blow the guy" isn't in any old-time nautical language list I've ever seen - it doesn't even sound nautical..
09-19-2013 11:23 PM
gamayun
Re: This curious nautical language

The guy is the line that runs to the spinnaker pole. What were ya'll thinking it was?!?
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