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  Topic Review (Newest First)
4 Weeks Ago 12:01 AM
Dana Marine Service
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbanderson50 View Post
Yeah I may need to make a trip to the northwest to look at all three. I'll have to combine it with a visit to my sister who lives in Seattle. Thanks for the input. I agree that the boat in surrey seems a little pricy for the little you get. Even if it has little use. It need a lot of work to get her ready for offshore.
Dear Jason I am the Marine Surveyor and owner of Dana Marine Service Marine surveyors and I must tell you that Ari De Kleer has his own Fraser41 for sale and they sell around $86,000 and well worth every penny.I think it might be the vessel Ari won the vancouver to maui race several years back. This is an engineered racing hull sailing racing and racing hulls come at a premium. Racing Folk will tell you that is a very fair price for a racing hull when they can pay 4,000,175 for 1 carbon fibre sail and throw it away after one race These racing folks will jump at a Fraser 41 endurance class. Especially one that Ari finished all the mahogany bright work himself. It is a classic hand roved fibreglass hull and looks like it just came out of the yard.
05-12-2015 04:09 PM
southbound
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by erps View Post
Chain plate work is actually on our to do list next year so we won't have to throw the boat away.
No, you never HAVE to throw the boat away. No matter what issues a boat might have, there will always be a dollar figure that will save it.
05-12-2015 04:06 PM
southbound
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
Nothing better that chain[plates bolted to the outside of a plastic hull . Easy change to make
All depends on the boat. Many have cored hulls above the water line and I can't think of a worse idea than through-bolting through a cored hull. But other than that (and the fact that, to me, external chainplates are really ugly), there isn't anything wrong with putting them on the outside, so long as it is done well.
05-11-2015 10:10 PM
erps
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
I'm just curious. Has anyone actually had an issues with the chain plates? And by anyone I mean owners of Fraser boats.
We don't know whether we have issues yet, but the chain plates always concerned me because we couldn't inspect them. Once we start digging into one or two next year, we'll have an idea whether they all have to be done or not. I don't think Aire put the chain plates in all his boats, so different owners may have had different ideas on how the job should be done.
05-11-2015 07:23 PM
Faster
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Have you seen this thread? Not a Fraser.. but perhaps (not sure) similar technique.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-m...placement.html
05-11-2015 06:48 PM
jbanderson50 I'm just curious. Has anyone actually had an issues with the chain plates? And by anyone I mean owners of Fraser boats. It clear what mr swains onion is on them being glassed in and I have no problem with anyone having an opinion. But have the Fraser boat had a history of chain plate issues or is this just a perceived problem?
I work in aviation and there are lots of parts that have glassed in fasteners. Weather it be threaded inserts or studs. The key is weather they were constructed correctly in the first place.
does anyone have a drawing of how the chain plates were installed?
I came across the Fraser 41 because it was listed by several consultants as a good boat for offshore cruising. I wouldn't think they would recommend the Fraser if there were major issues with the design of the vessel.
05-11-2015 05:13 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

If there are no bolts on the glassed in chain plates and you want to go for external chain plates taping into the old ones will give you the most leak proof holes you can get, treating the old ones as backup plates. Water is less likely to leak thru treads than thru smooth thru bolts.
05-10-2015 05:15 PM
erps
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
While Fraser wasn't alone in this practice (many IPs and some Passports utilize(d) embedded chainplates), I can't think of any excuse for it. Seems like it creates a disposable boat.
Chain plate work is actually on our to do list next year so we won't have to throw the boat away.
05-09-2015 05:54 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Nothing better that chain[plates bolted to the outside of a plastic hull . Easy change to make
05-07-2015 04:02 PM
southbound
Re: Fraser Built Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
As 40 ft plastic boats go, Fraser 41s and 42s were some of the best offshore cruising boats built. Compared to Beneteaus Hunters and Catalinas, they are twice the boat at half the price. Moderate deadrise gives them a very comfortable motion at sea. Good hull balance with a moderate sized transom gives them good directional stability. Some of their rudders look a bit fragile but I have never heard of anyone losing one. A long ,wide keel attachment to the hull with inside ballast means no chance of losing a keel and no worries about keel bolts. The hull deck joint with the deck molding turned upward and sandwiching against the extended hull, is one of the best made, similar to the Rawson 30. Minimizes chances of leaks along the rail. One could bolt stanchion bases to them especially with a solid top rail, eliminating thru deck bolts, and the leaks they cause. Those I have seen have 30 inch high stanchions, far better than most stock boats.( Like a bendycatahunt)
I was seriously looking at Frasers at one point until it appeared that most had glassed in chainplates. If true, this strikes me a bit like welding an engine into an automobile. When even the inspection of chainplates requires sawing through joinery and grinding away the hull from the inside, chainplates are likely to be neglected to the extent that catastrophic rig failure becomes a real threat. And replacing the chainplates could require through-bolting from the outside of the hull. While Fraser wasn't alone in this practice (many IPs and some Passports utilize(d) embedded chainplates), I can't think of any excuse for it. Seems like it creates a disposable boat.
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