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Thread: Production Boats and the Limits Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
5 Hours Ago 11:00 PM
eko_eko
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I thought T37 meant Tayana 37 in this context. It's one of Bob's.
7 Hours Ago 09:21 PM
Lazerbrains
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I am familiar with the Blackwatch, and the T37. And you are right, I am younger than the Blackwatch, and they are quite rare on the west coast. I did once see a gorgeous one that sails out of San Diego - beautiful boat that looked like a full-time job to keep up with the brightwork. Is that what you had Outbound?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
You must be younger than Outbound or myself.

The first T37 was full keel - designed by Hood and first built in 1965. Available with fiberglass cabin as T37 or Black Watch with mahogany cabin.

Black Watch below.



Link to details: BLACK WATCH 37 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
7 Hours Ago 09:11 PM
aeventyr60
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Unfortunately, catching lines around my prop is a regular experience in Asia. Nobody is immune from it here. I carry a couple of serrated swiss army steak knives just for this. Sometimes I can catch the change in pitch and normal shaft sound before it get's too tight and shut the motor down. Some time a quick blast of reverse will cast the line free. Other times the engine will shut down. Very small gap between the shaft anode and shaft housing, small line gets wound up in that space, has to be cut out.

As well as line, I've had plastic bags, rice sacks and a whole host of other debris caught in the prop.. Indonesia was the worst.
7 Hours Ago 09:10 PM
Capt Len
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Up this coast it can be prawn trap floats pulled under by 5 or 6 knts of current If you don't realize your sidways over ground you stand a good chance of meeting a rope. Hanging by your stern in the dark till slack or until the tug and log boom comes thru can be testing
7 Hours Ago 09:09 PM
mitiempo
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
T37 as in Tartan? That's not a full keel with a prop in an aperture - fin keel with skeg and exposed prop.
You must be younger than Outbound or myself.

The first T37 was full keel - designed by Hood and first built in 1965. Available with fiberglass cabin as T37 or Black Watch with mahogany cabin.

Black Watch below.



Link to details: BLACK WATCH 37 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
8 Hours Ago 08:39 PM
Lazerbrains
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

T37 as in Tartan? That's not a full keel with a prop in an aperture - fin keel with skeg and exposed prop.

At any rate, to Jeff's experience, I would think it would be easier to get the line out of the rudder/keel gap then removing one entwined around a prop . A float can't jam the line up in there with anywhere near the force of the winding action of a prop, and can't be wound around multiple times. Furthermore, a line winding around a shaft will bind up the shaft and can potentially cause more damage than just temporarily disabling the boat. And if it misses the prop, it can still catch on your rudder.

Obviously the best thing is to avoid the crab pots when possible. I'm amazed I've never hit one - when lobster season rolls around here, the commercial guys literally set them up immediately outside the harbor gate - it is a minefield if you get stuck in it. Worse, it seems half of the floats these days are painted black instead of an easy to spot color such as white or red.
8 Hours Ago 08:38 PM
Capt Len
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

SS finger bridging the keel/rudder gap is a bonus if transiting the trap grounds. Grew up with propeller guard cages on gillnetters and seiners.
8 Hours Ago 08:21 PM
outbound
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Ditto except full keels were CD28, and T37. Both times under power.
12 Hours Ago 04:31 PM
Jeff_H
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazerbrains View Post
Outbound, I think the difference is that with the prop in an aperture on a full keel (or with Bob's "chastity" design) you won't catch the line in the first place, as the keel will ride over the line.

I was on my buddies boat this summer when he caught a line with his fin keel/spade/feathering prop. It took us over an hour of diving to get it off - lucky for us it was summer and warmer.

Once you catch a line it wraps tight and is difficult to remove, regardless of prop/keel/shaft, etc.
All my life I have heard that full keels are better for avoiding catching lines. From a common sense standpoint that would seem like it should be true. But at the risk of jinxing myself, the only boat that I ever caught a trap warp on was my old Stadel Cutter 'Indian', with about as small an aperture and full a keel as I can imagine.
[IMG]Indian out of the water photo Indianoutofwatersmall.jpg[/IMG]

The only boat that I ever caught a line and jammed a rudder had a long CCA style keel with attached rudder. (slid along the bottom of the keel and right into the joint at the heel of the rudder)

Jeff
12 Hours Ago 04:13 PM
Lazerbrains
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobperry View Post
Lazer:
I lived with a sail drive, vintage 1978, for 15 years and loved it. I never had an issue. I will use sail drives whenever I have that option.
It's not that I don't like them, I'm not sure I like the additional maintainance which requires regular haulout. That and they seem to corrode quite fast at my marina.
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