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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Buying a First 40.7
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Thread: Buying a First 40.7 Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-12-2007 02:16 PM
Giulietta
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H
I have spent a lot of time on 40.7's and I really love these boats. They are fast and easy to handle. They have a simple but very workable interior layout. They offer comfortable berths and great ventilation.

They are a little dated as race boats but the boat that I am on has won at least its class all kinds or major events, (Key West, Chesapeake NOODs, Carribean Ocean Racing triangle, Block Island etc.) and is still competitive.

I would think that they are a nearly ideal cruising boat for the Med, easily handling the transitions between heavy and light air very well. The boat that I sail on is six years old and has held up well after over 10,000 miles short-handed offshore and a bunch of hard racing.

What makes the boat work as a short-handed cruiser is its ability to sail with a #3 and mainsail in a very wide range of conditions. That said, I would want to make sure that you set up the cunningham to handle the first reef so that you can reef on the fly from the cockpit on the fly. Another nice feature of these boats is that they sail reasonably well under mainsail alone which is nice for shortacking short-handed.

The traveler in the cockpit just is not an issue, and is really ideal for short handed cruising, placing the mainsheet right at the helmsman.
The 2:1 mainsheet is nice for racing but perhaps less than perfect for a cruising boat.

If you are not sure about chosing between a Bene 40.7 and a Hallberg Rassy 34.2, I think you need to take more time, and sail on a bunch of boats, so that you can define your specific sailing tastes and goals. These are such extremely different boats. One thing that has impressed me with the 40.7's is how well they have held their prices, with nearly no depreciation and relatively quick sales so if you made a mistake you should be able to easily resell. I don't know if that is as true with the Hallberg R which is a bit of a niche market boat over here.
~

Oh well...that says it all...my wrong
We defenately live on different sides of the World
03-12-2007 01:29 PM
Jeff_H I have spent a lot of time on 40.7's and I really love these boats. They are fast and easy to handle. They have a simple but very workable interior layout. They offer comfortable berths and great ventilation.

They are a little dated as race boats but the boat that I am on has won at least its class all kinds or major events, (Key West, Chesapeake NOODs, Carribean Ocean Racing triangle, Block Island etc.) and is still competitive.

I would think that they are a nearly ideal cruising boat for the Med, easily handling the transitions between heavy and light air very well. The boat that I sail on is six years old and has held up well after over 10,000 miles short-handed offshore and a bunch of hard racing.

What makes the boat work as a short-handed cruiser is its ability to sail with a #3 and mainsail in a very wide range of conditions. That said, I would want to make sure that you set up the cunningham to handle the first reef so that you can reef on the fly from the cockpit on the fly. Another nice feature of these boats is that they sail reasonably well under mainsail alone which is nice for shortacking short-handed.

The traveler in the cockpit just is not an issue, and is really ideal for short handed cruising, placing the mainsheet right at the helmsman.
The 2:1 mainsheet is nice for racing but perhaps less than perfect for a cruising boat.

If you are not sure about chosing between a Bene 40.7 and a Hallberg Rassy 34.2, I think you need to take more time, and sail on a bunch of boats, so that you can define your specific sailing tastes and goals. These are such extremely different boats. One thing that has impressed me with the 40.7's is how well they have held their prices, with nearly no depreciation and relatively quick sales so if you made a mistake you should be able to easily resell. I don't know if that is as true with the Hallberg R which is a bit of a niche market boat over here.
03-11-2007 09:01 PM
sailingdog I'd say get the HR34.2. It is most definitely not a racing boat... it is an out and out passagemaking bluewater boat. It is more than capable of doing all the sailing you describe and handling even the longer bluewater passages with ease.

Giu's advice is usually pretty sound, unless the French are involved.
03-11-2007 08:04 PM
Giulietta BUY THAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! its 34"

Don't look back, don't think twice. And once you come to Spain...which sucks...go around and come to Cascais...Bring the HR...we then take you on a ride in the 40.7 so you see I am right!!!

But I responded to your post, just used the previous one In case you had forgotten!!

I allways wanted a HR...when I get older and grumpy. Tha's one of the choices...

look at these on my neck of the woods!!!

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...ck&searchtype=


http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...ck&searchtype=

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=1586864


AND WITH THAT YOU CAN GO AROUND THE WORLD, TO THE MOON AND BEYOND!!!!!

Smart man!!
03-11-2007 08:02 PM
sailingguy123 Giulietta,

This is a different topic, but do you have any thoughts on the Hallberg-Rassy 342 or Hallberg-Rassy boats in general? This is another boat that I am considering although it is very different from the 40.7.

Sailingguy
03-11-2007 05:44 PM
Giulietta
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingguy123
I was initially considering purchasing the new Beneteau 40, but I contacted a dealer and discovered that it would not be available until August, which would prevent me from using it this summer. I have now focused my attention on the First 40.7 and was wondering if the first series boats were more difficult to sail than the number series.

Also, someone told me that in-mast furling would be a bad idea for sailing in the Mediterranean. Can someone please explain to me why this is so? I understand that the first series do not come with furling mains, but am curious as to what the answer is because I have friends who use furling mains in the Mediterranean without any serious problems.

I plan on using the boat for coastal cruising around Turkey and possibly a trip to Spain and would like to be able to sail a straight line from Turkey rather than having to go along the coast to save time. Would the boat be capable of doing this type of limited bluewater cruising? One concern is the limited water and fuel storage of the First series. Beneteau does not offer extra water or fuel tanks as a factory option, but has anyone heard of these modifications being made either through a special request to the factory or having third party install them?

My reason for choosing the First rather than a number series is the higher quality of the components and better sailing ability. The crew will most likely be 2-3 people.

One concern I have is the mounting of the traveler right behind the wheel, which obstructs entry into and out of the cockpit. Does anyone have experience with the First boats and know whether this is something you get used to after a while? Currently there are two First 40.7s for sail in Turkey, both 2001 models and both for around $180,000.

I would also welcome any comments about the First series in general, especially from people who have owned them or sailed on them. I have yet to hear about any problems or negative comments about the boats other than their limited water and fuel storage and somewhat cramped interiors compared to the number series.

Thanks for your help.
Sailingguy123
Sailinguy…I believe we already had this conversation a while ago…

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buying...anis-40-a.html

This is what I said then:

"Sailingguy, I know the 40.7 pretty well...we used to race against them..and sometimes in them...there's a lot of them here....

the 40,7 can be single handed, and it depends on your experience, but there are no in mast or boom furlers for that boat..the first .7 series are race boats, hence the main on the floor and the removable seats...if you have no experience don't go there..It can "bite" you...Its a racer/cruiser, fast but not confortable...The genoa whinches are far from the wheel and requires a good auto pilot to help you tack...the boat need constant adjustment on the main traveller, as opposed to other cruising boats, so seating on the wheel side must be done. Inside is smaller than normal and space for storage is minimal...the boat is built sturdier, but lighter, and less "nice" finishings there, too. Tank and engines obviously are also smaller... sometimes too small...Several friends have problems with water incursions, and badly finished fiberglass deck fixings.."

This is my answer to your today's post:

Yes, it will be requiring more from you, its a racer cruiser, not a cruiser.Its designed for performance, altough getting old now, and faster better boats are now produced. If you race and sailed a lot before you should have no problem...if you are a cruiser...I'd wait till August. Normally second hand ones have been racing and are stressed and might have hiden damages that one might not see easily....again..depends on how you sail...I don't have any problems sailing it..

The first again, being designed for racing with minimal crusing conditions DOES NOT come with a furler main (and I doubt Benetau would do one for you).

I don't know why the in-mast furler is bad in the Med...if it is bad in the Med its bad anywhere else....I personally don't like it but only because it restrains performance...diminishes sail trim and reduces main area (a no-no for me) it might be great for cruising but not for performance..the sail is just a triangle shaped bed sheet..... put one in a 40.7 is like buying a Corvette and install smaller wheels, a roof rack, a trailer behind and a diesel engine....that, does not make sense to me...besides...if you do it..you'll have to love it FOREVER.. no one would ever buy it from you....at least in their right mind...

Cruising in the med is not exactly blue water cruising, its far away coastal. Save time for what? I don't recommend you do that...specially on a 40.7..stay near land. The Med bites sometimes, has a lot of blind traffic, specially in the “straight line” routes and they don’t stop…

Yes the boat would do that and would cross the Atlantic, too. Probably faster than any othe boat that size...unconfortable but doable.

Plastimo makes bladder water tankh shaped to fit in the V berth and under the salon seat, boosting your water tanks by up to 1000 liters!!!

See it here
. That is a good optional as they deflate when empty. I have 2 and they plug directly into my water tank hose, so I did no modification.

Benetau has not time and interest in changin a Benetau for you...believe me.

And if they do $$$$$$$$ you better buy a Rolls Royce and drive....


That is not true..the components ARE NOT better, the sailing gear, pulleys mast etc, are the same, rated for higher loads...but not better..stronger, yes.

The finish is much poorer inside than a cruiser because it has to be lighter...the finish..welll lets leave it there...looks like they did not havde sand paper and varnish at Benetau that day...

The boat sails faster...and better if you are racing...for cruising...you want confort...you will need to reef and use motor...


I have that, never had any problems...it depends on your experience...but whoever hits it...will only do it once...guaranteed... that is why I raised mine.

Yes you get used to it...I like it..its sexy...

It does not obstruct the entry to the cabin...if you let something like that bother you...then DO NOT get that boat...its not for you.

Again $180.000 for 2001 used race boats....I wouldn't...in a year you will not even get $140.000. Its a less wanted boat, unless its for race...its an old design so not so performing anymore, so no one wants them soon..besides...racing abuses a boat..if it was not built with that in mind, production race boats have been stressd and things will start failing...thgus the sailing coastal

That is a boat I would buy....I like it...fast and sexy but not for cruising. But a good boat...

I also remember advising you to get a better/newer/cheaper boat elsewhere in Spain, Italy Portugal (1000 more choices) and take it to Turkey...you did not say anything...so....well....
03-11-2007 04:37 PM
sailingguy123
Buying a First 40.7

I was initially considering purchasing the new Beneteau 40, but I contacted a dealer and discovered that it would not be available until August, which would prevent me from using it this summer. I have now focused my attention on the First 40.7 and was wondering if the first series boats were more difficult to sail than the number series.

Also, someone told me that in-mast furling would be a bad idea for sailing in the Mediterranean. Can someone please explain to me why this is so? I understand that the first series do not come with furling mains, but am curious as to what the answer is because I have friends who use furling mains in the Mediterranean without any serious problems.

I plan on using the boat for coastal cruising around Turkey and possibly a trip to Spain and would like to be able to sail a straight line from Turkey rather than having to go along the coast to save time. Would the boat be capable of doing this type of limited bluewater cruising? One concern is the limited water and fuel storage of the First series. Beneteau does not offer extra water or fuel tanks as a factory option, but has anyone heard of these modifications being made either through a special request to the factory or having third party install them?

My reason for choosing the First rather than a number series is the higher quality of the components and better sailing ability. The crew will most likely be 2-3 people.

One concern I have is the mounting of the traveler right behind the wheel, which obstructs entry into and out of the cockpit. Does anyone have experience with the First boats and know whether this is something you get used to after a while? Currently there are two First 40.7s for sail in Turkey, both 2001 models and both for around $180,000.

I would also welcome any comments about the First series in general, especially from people who have owned them or sailed on them. I have yet to hear about any problems or negative comments about the boats other than their limited water and fuel storage and somewhat cramped interiors compared to the number series.

Thanks for your help.
Sailingguy123

 
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